locktite on castle nut? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Schrag4
10-27-2012, 15:41
Ok, so I'm building my first AR, and I just got the LPK and a standard 6 pos stock. I've installed the LPK and also the stock, but I don't have the right tool to tighten the castle nut, so I'm not quite done (it's hand tight at the moment).

So, when I finally get the tool to tighten the castle nut, should I use locktite? Or is it unnecessary?

Thanks!

Cole125
10-27-2012, 15:46
I use a little blue loc-tite on the castle nut on all my builds. Make sure to use blue removable, not red. From what I gather if its tightened to spec you don't NEED to use thread locker though.

Another option is staking the castle nut, plenty of youtube videos on it.

mvician
10-27-2012, 16:55
Stake the nut, don't use a thread locker. If you do use it, use just a little, don't hose it on.
And yes, even torqued to spec, the nut will loosen eventually.

surf
10-27-2012, 17:22
As mentioned no loctite needed. Torque to proper spec and stake.

Carbine 38-42 ftlbs
Rifle 35-39 ftlbs

Schrag4
10-27-2012, 18:45
Thanks for the replies! :wavey:

WoodenPlank
10-27-2012, 18:47
Stake the nut, don't use a thread locker. If you do use it, use just a little, don't hose it on.
And yes, even torqued to spec, the nut will loosen eventually.

Ive never had one walk loose, even under somewhat heavy use, so long as it was torqued to spec. The only reason my current one is staked is to cut down on any sudden urges to change from the standard lock plate.

bmoore
10-27-2012, 19:10
OP you have been given some good info. I will add that I did a drop of blue Loctite on one of my castle nuts. It held great and when I needed to get it off I just held some heat on it for a little bit, when it came off the it kind of gummed up the threads. I would stake or torque to the specs that Surf posted.

Big Bird
10-28-2012, 07:02
Torque to spec and stake. Staking takes 5 minutes--is easy and not permanent. With a proper castle nut wrench it doesn't take much force at all to unscrew a staked castle nut. I've done it several times and its no big deal.

Schrag4
10-28-2012, 09:29
I think I'll just stake it after I torque it to spec. I really didn't know what that meant until I spent about 5 minutes on youtube, doesn't seem like a big deal (yes I'm that much of a noob).

Thanks again for all the replies!

PlasticGuy
10-28-2012, 11:03
I have seen unsecured castle nuts work loose. I always do something to secure them. I used to stake them, but now I just use a drop of blue loctite. It works as well, and is easier to break free if I need to remove it later.

smokin762
10-28-2012, 11:10
Ive never had one walk loose, even under somewhat heavy use, so long as it was torqued to spec. The only reason my current one is staked is to cut down on any sudden urges to change from the standard lock plate.

I put this rear reciever plate on all my 16" AR's. I even have them for my 20" rifles with the A2 stock. I like it. :supergrin:

http://www.gggaz.com/looped-receiver-end-plate-sling-adapter-for-fixed-stocks.html

smokin762
10-28-2012, 11:12
I have seen unsecured castle nuts work loose. I always do something to secure them. I used to stake them, but now I just use a drop of blue loctite. It works as well, and is easier to break free if I need to remove it later.

I do the samething. I never had one come loose yet.

WayaX
10-28-2012, 23:04
No loctite. Torque, then stake. This is the proper way to do it, and when done correctly, works.

RatDrall
10-31-2012, 12:07
I loctited (removable) mine, then staked it.

I decided to go with a different endplate a few weeks later. It took a lot of force to break the staked and loctited castle nut free, but it came loose with a cheapie castle nut tool, with no damage to the threads or anything.

I see no reason not to loctie the castle nut with removable loctite before staking it.

Mayhem like Me
10-31-2012, 12:33
I loctited (removable) mine, then staked it.

I decided to go with a different endplate a few weeks later. It took a lot of force to break the staked and loctited castle nut free, but it came loose with a cheapie castle nut tool, with no damage to the threads or anything.

I see no reason not to loctie the castle nut with removable loctite before staking it.

No reason to do it either ...if you are staking.

smokin762
10-31-2012, 13:46
No reason to do it either ...if you are staking.

Are you saying there is no reason to remove the castle nut?

Mayhem like Me
10-31-2012, 14:02
Are you saying there is no reason to remove the castle nut?

LOCKTITE....Not Needed when staking....

smokin762
10-31-2012, 14:23
LOCKTITE....Not Needed when staking....

I understand what Staking does. However, some people like to change things. It's a lot cheaper than buying a new AR. I don't collect them.

I think what some people miss is why staking might need to be done. If you don't own a F/A weapon. I view it as pointless.

Mayhem like Me
10-31-2012, 14:43
UGGHHHH .....Properly staked wont ruin a thing and can be restaked..
My post pointed out no need to locktite AND STAKE.... as locktite is not needed When staking...

Seen plenty of guns that when worked hard in classes lose tension on the castle nut when not staked, no FA fire , just good old fashioned reloading drills and stoppage drills along with hundereds of transition drills.

Staking is done for a reason, if you don't want to take the 3 seconds to correctly place a punch and hit it thats OK. Just understand that locktite is not (just as good) .

smokin762
10-31-2012, 14:55
UGGHHHH .....Properly staked wont ruin a thing and can be restaked..
My post pointed out no need to locktite AND STAKE.... as locktite is not needed When staking...

Seen plenty of guns that when worked hard in classes lose tension on the castle nut when not staked, no FA fire , just good old fashioned reloading drills and stoppage drills along with hundereds of transition drills.

Staking is done for a reason, if you don't want to take the 3 seconds to correctly place a punch and hit it thats OK. Just understand that locktite is not (just as good) .

Okay I get, you feel this absolutely needs to be done and there is no other option. Iíll just agree to disagree with ya on this. :winkie:

Mayhem like Me
10-31-2012, 15:19
Okay I get, you feel this absolutely needs to be done and there is no other option. I’ll just agree to disagree with ya on this. :winkie:
Good grief there is the correct way to do it in any number of half past ways.. Pick up a rifle you bet your life on from reputable manufacturer. it will be staked


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smokin762
10-31-2012, 15:25
Good grief there is the correct way to do it in any number of half past ways.. Pick up a rifle you bet your life on from reputable manufacturer. it will be staked


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:rofl: Relax and breath it's going to be okay.

I know, I have broken those stakes before to change things. I just don't agree with it. I have also ran my rfles hard at shooting events. And nothing went wrong.

Mayhem like Me
10-31-2012, 18:22
:rofl: Relax and breath it's going to be okay.

I know, I have broken those stakes before to change things. I just don't agree with it. I have also ran my rfles hard at shooting events. And nothing went wrong.

You have to understand there Is my way, and the wrong way...... :)


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Schrag4
10-31-2012, 19:52
Wow, didn't mean to start anything!

I already staked, no loctite. :tongueout:

smokin762
11-01-2012, 15:05
You have to understand there Is my way, and the wrong way...... :)


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:rofl::rofl:Nope. I never noticed that. :tongueout:

:wavey: