30-06 Whitetail Cartridge [Archive] - Glock Talk

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superspud
10-30-2012, 09:48
going to be doing some whitetail hunting and need to get a good 30-06 load.

i know nothing about what grain or type of bullet for this, im more of a small game type of hunter.


i was told by my hunting buddies to look in the 150-165 grain market with a soft tip bullet, which narrows it down to about 150 different types of bullet / manufacturers...

please advise, links are welcomed...

pennlineman
10-30-2012, 10:11
I've killed a lot of deer with a .30-06. For factory ammo the plain old Remington 150 grain core lokt bullets have never failed me. They've been working for years. 165 grain Sierra game kings worked well with my reloads.

SCmasterblaster
10-30-2012, 10:19
If you reload, you can utilize the lighter .308 bullets like a 125-30gr bullets for small game. But for deer, I'd recommend the 150-180-gr SPs.

davsco
10-30-2012, 10:24
my favorites for 308 and 30-06 for deer are the winchester ballistic silvertips 150g. can find at walmart and certainly true gun stores. with thin-skinned game like deer, they provide explosive wound channels.

definitely look online for pics showing where the vitals are on deer so you know the best place to aim. and of course, shoot your rifle using the loads you will be hunting with at various distances you expect to shoot at so that you know where the bullets are hitting and what holdovers you may need.

also set up some pie-plate-sized targets at various distances (50, 100, 150 yds) and shoot them offhand. if you can't hit them offhand, then you know you will need steady rests when shooting at deer at those distances.

good luck!

SCmasterblaster
10-30-2012, 10:29
my favorites for 308 and 30-06 for deer are the winchester ballistic silvertips 150g. can find at walmart and certainly true gun stores. with thin-skinned game like deer, they provide explosive wound channels.

definitely look online for pics showing where the vitals are on deer so you know the best place to aim. and of course, shoot your rifle using the loads you will be hunting with at various distances you expect to shoot at so that you know where the bullets are hitting and what holdovers you may need.

also set up some pie-plate-sized targets at various distances (50, 100, 150 yds) and shoot them offhand. if you can't hit them offhand, then you know you will need steady rests when shooting at deer at those distances.

good luck!

I have often wondered what deer hunters do to take deer without too much meat damage. Is most of the meat far away from the heart-lung wound channel?

yellolab
10-30-2012, 10:32
Yup. Stay away from the shoulder.
And use a strong bullet such as Barnes- not that they are needed for whitetail, but they just blow apart like a softer lead core would.

dkf
10-30-2012, 10:53
I always hunt deer in thick wooded areas where shots are usually fairly short. So I usually used Remington 180 Soft Points. Not the PSP (pointed soft points) but the SP (soft points). The soft points open up a little faster and have more frontal area on the bullet. Also a load that will work for black bear. The 180s are on the heavy side for deer but they work well for my situation.

SCmasterblaster
10-30-2012, 11:09
I always hunt deer in thick wooded areas where shots are usually fairly short. So I usually used Remington 180 Soft Points. Not the PSP (pointed soft points) but the SP (soft points). The soft points open up a little faster and have more frontal area on the bullet. Also a load that will work for black bear. The 180s are on the heavy side for deer but they work well for my situation.

You didn't mention your caliber - is it .308 or .30-'06? Or something else? But wait, the thread title says .30-'06. Duh

dkf
10-30-2012, 11:53
That 180 SP load is available in both .308 and 30-06. Just goes a little slower in the .308. I would drop down in weight for deer if the blunt SP bullet profile was more available. Even loose bullets are limited. Just make sure to shoot them before you go out to double check accuracy and scope zero.

t-shooter
10-30-2012, 18:28
I have killed several whitetail with my 270 loaded with 130 grain Federal Premium Sierra Gamekings. The deer have consistently dropped in their tracks. Not one deer has taken more than one step. The bullets are usually recovered with the lead and copper jacket separated and resting just under the skin on the off side.

I believe that the 150 grain 3006 ammo of the same make and model will deliver identical results.

My $.02 worth.

siberian505
10-30-2012, 18:34
I use 240 graIin Woodleighs at 2325 fps. Oh but we have both kinds of bears at times in the yard....................

Zombie Steve
10-30-2012, 18:51
Deer just aren't that hard to kill. I'm not big on the silvertips, nosler ballistic tips, or that style of bullet construction. You will get stories of deer dropping like they were hit by a lightning bolt from Zeus, but you're going to have a lot of bloodshot meat. Realistically, if you're using a regular soft point, you might have to track them a whopping 50-100 yards, but you'll be able to eat it. :cool:

If you're picking one all-rounder for the .30-06, it's hard to beat a 165 grain boat tail design. I've never had a deer stop a 150 grain bullet, but the 165's just seem to fly better and buck the wind better on those longer shots.

I haven't bought factory ammo in several years, but I can tell you that you don't need a bonded bullet, or even a boat tail (200+ yard shots are really rare) for white tail. Again, they just aren't that hard to kill. Last muley I got was with some wheel weights I cast into a .44 mag lswc.

Go shoot a few 150's or 165's and see what your rifle likes.

Federal Power shok, Winchester Super-X, Remington Core-lokt... the old school soft points will serve you well.

Waidmanns Heil!

shawnbryan
10-30-2012, 19:04
150 grain silvertips have worked extremely well for me here in Vermont.

fgutie35
10-30-2012, 19:18
accuracy is paramount if you want to save the most meat possible. You did not mention what brand rifle. each brand and each type of barrel like a specific factory load better than the rest. In my case, I have a savage with a stainless steel heavy fluted barrel that is 26" and the Remington Core-Locks 150gr. are its favorite factory load. Of course I reload better more accurate loads than those, but if I feel lazy, I can just pick up a box of the core locks and know I won't miss the shot. By the way, I like to hunt my white tail facing me. I aim right under the jaw and always place my bullet right in the middle of the neck breaking the neck bone and spinal cord, so the meat is not as thought as if the deer survives for couple of seconds after impact.

countrygun
10-30-2012, 20:03
For a couple of decades my "factory" deer round in the 30-06 has been the Remington 165 gn "corelockt". Not quite as easy to find as the 150s or 180s but it has been worth it.

Happypuppy
10-30-2012, 22:03
A quality 150 grain is all you need. I have shot a lot of deer with the Remington, Nosler and Winchester loads. All work well.


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Jake Starr
10-31-2012, 05:40
For WT deer any 06 will do.

SCmasterblaster
10-31-2012, 09:33
150 grain silvertips have worked extremely well for me here in Vermont.

Howdy, neighbor. I am going after deer this year with a 12ga Slug Gun. :cool:

collim1
10-31-2012, 13:33
.30-06 is more than enough for deer. I doubt you could find a load that a deer would limp away from.

Remington Core-lokt and Winchester Power Points have been killing deer for a long time, and depending on your individual gun it may shoot one of them very accurately. My rifle shoots them about 2.5" at 100yds.

If you want a "better" load try the Federal Fusion. They are a bonded soft point and will generally shoot more accurately than the Remingtons or Winchesters, once again though depends on your individual rifle.

I would stick with the 150g varieties for .30-06. More than enough for deer, and will recoil less than the heavier loads. I also prefer soft points to ballistic tips for deer.

I would try the proven cheaper loads I listed above first, and if they shoot an acceptable group in your gun go with one of them as they are several dollars a box cheaper than the premium loads. My hunting buddy's Savage 110 shoots Core-lokts at an inch all day long, no reason to buy a more expensive load for deer IMO.

Hornady also makes some great loads for deer, but are more expensive and I haven't tried many of them.

I bought several boxes of ammo when I bought my .270win Rem700 CDL. I found the Fusions shot a .75" 3 shot group and 5 shot groups just a hair over an inch. I am not the best shot with a scoped rifle so thats assuming I did not part. That was considerably better than any other load I tried. I went back and bought them out of that load in the same lot number.

At my hunting property 99% of the shots I am gonna get are under 100yds, so the extra accuracy I get from the Fusions is probably not needed, but I get them on sale for $23/20box so why not?

Arvinator
10-31-2012, 17:43
For 15 years, I have been using the Federal 30-06A load, the plain jane Federal 150 grain soft point. Not sure how many Deer I've taken, but is has worked great.
It has been very accurate in my Remington 700ADL I bought new in 1997.

Frank V
10-31-2012, 20:32
The .30-06 is a fantastic cartridge. The Remington Core Lock has been suggested & it's a fine load. I've had great results with Federal ammo, I'd probably choose a 150-165gr bullet
Frank

Clutch Cargo
11-01-2012, 03:47
Im 30-06, I'd use anything but FMJ military surplus ammo.

vafish
11-01-2012, 11:32
going to be doing some whitetail hunting and need to get a good 30-06 load.

i know nothing about what grain or type of bullet for this, im more of a small game type of hunter.


i was told by my hunting buddies to look in the 150-165 grain market with a soft tip bullet, which narrows it down to about 150 different types of bullet / manufacturers...

please advise, links are welcomed...

Your buddies are right.

Any 150-165 gr soft point will work just fine.

No need for the expensive stuff.

posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire (http://www.outdoorhub.com/mobile/)

SCmasterblaster
11-01-2012, 13:41
Seeing how I have a 50-yard range with my 12ga slug gun, I am going to use a tree stand, or just stand next to a tree.

MAC702
11-01-2012, 13:45
For WT deer any 06 will do.

This.

There is no bullet that comes out of a .30-06 that won't cleanly kill a deer.

The absolute cheapest stuff you can find at Wal-Mart will work perfectly, but no FMJ.

Spend a lot more time practicing holding the rifle steady and getting into jackass shooting positions and learning how to use a sling.

shawnbryan
11-01-2012, 13:57
This.

There is no bullet that comes out of a .30-06 that won't cleanly kill a deer.

The absolute cheapest stuff you can find at Wal-Mart will work perfectly, but no FMJ.

Spend a lot more time practicing holding the rifle steady and getting into jackass shooting positions and learning how to use a sling.

Perfectly said - skill is far more important than the load out of 30-06. Deer are easy to kill - provided you make a clean shot.

SCmasterblaster
11-01-2012, 13:57
This.

There is no bullet that comes out of a .30-06 that won't cleanly kill a deer.

The absolute cheapest stuff you can find at Wal-Mart will work perfectly, but no FMJ.

Spend a lot more time practicing holding the rifle steady and getting into jackass shooting positions and learning how to use a sling.

That is right. The .30-"06 cartridge is plenty powerful for whitetail deer, and elk, for that matter. No military FMJs though.

dougader
11-02-2012, 00:04
Mark another one down for your "old school" soft point. As stated above, deer are not hard to put down so you don't need to spend $50 on a box of shells.

Also mentioned above (several times) are the Remington Core-Lokt cartridges. They just plain work, so if your rifle shoots them well I say just go for it. The 150 grain load is plenty for deer. Around here the Core Lokt ammo is always on sale around hunting season, too.

I used to hunt with a guy who had 2 huge heads mounted in his office. One was a moose and the other - just as large - was an elk. He had the bullet that he had shot the elk with in a little plastic bottle. It was the only core lokt bullet he ever recovered, and it had entered the elk's left rear hip on a quartering away shot and traveled diagonally up through the right lung and was found just under the hide on the right front shoulder. Both the left rear hip and right front leg were broken. The elk was dead by the time they walked up there... about an 80 yard shot.

I took the bullet home one afternoon to weigh it for Grover and was suprised to see that the 180 grain core lokt still weighed 160 grains. That's about 88% weight retention on a round that broke bones and penetrated a goodly amount. Textbook performance.

SCmasterblaster
11-02-2012, 07:58
Mark another one down for your "old school" soft point. As stated above, deer are not hard to put down so you don't need to spend $50 on a box of shells.

Also mentioned above (several times) are the Remington Core-Lokt cartridges. They just plain work, so if your rifle shoots them well I say just go for it. The 150 grain load is plenty for deer. Around here the Core Lokt ammo is always on sale around hunting season, too.

I used to hunt with a guy who had 2 huge heads mounted in his office. One was a moose and the other - just as large - was an elk. He had the bullet that he had shot the elk with in a little plastic bottle. It was the only core lokt bullet he ever recovered, and it had entered the elk's left rear hip on a quartering away shot and traveled diagonally up through the right lung and was found just under the hide on the right front shoulder. Both the left rear hip and right front leg were broken. The elk was dead by the time they walked up there... about an 80 yard shot.

I took the bullet home one afternoon to weigh it for Grover and was suprised to see that the 180 grain core lokt still weighed 160 grains. That's about 88% weight retention on a round that broke bones and penetrated a goodly amount. Textbook performance.

There must have been a lot of spoiled meat in that elk.

whitebread
11-02-2012, 13:00
As said, anything will work, but the best load out there these days is the 180grain Barnes TTSX. Extremely good accuracy, excellent ballistic coefficient, and second to none terminal ballistics. Loading 0.050" off the lands gives me better accuracy than MatchKing HPBT.

SCmasterblaster
11-02-2012, 13:31
As said, anything will work, but the best load out there these days is the 180grain Barnes TTSX. Extremely good accuracy, excellent ballistic coefficient, and second to none terminal ballistics. Loading 0.050" off the lands gives me better accuracy than MatchKing HPBT.

I don't load rifle ammo yet, but just how do you adjust the OAL so that the bullet lands is .05 inches from the rifling?

Zombie Steve
11-02-2012, 14:34
I don't load rifle ammo yet, but just how do you adjust the OAL so that the bullet lands is .05 inches from the rifling?

In a nut shell, you're loading one long, jamming it into the lands (it will seat the bullet deeper), measuring overall length and then backing off the desired amount.

On most Rem 700's I've seen, you can forget it. Too much freebore. The lands are too far away. A round loaded that long won't fit in the magazine. Other barrels, it's easier. You also have to deal with inconsistencies in ogive in any given batch of bullets.

Best advice is to just look up overall length that was tested by the bullet manufacturer and do that. Distance from the lands can make a difference, but it's way down the rabbit hole compared to finding a good powder / bullet combination.

Glockdude1
11-02-2012, 14:36
http://palmettostatearmory.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/1/5/150gr_silvertip_1.jpg

:thumbsup:

whitebread
11-02-2012, 15:31
I don't load rifle ammo yet, but just how do you adjust the OAL so that the bullet lands is .05 inches from the rifling?

http://www.hornady.com/store/Lock-N-Load-OAL-Gauge-Straight-1Each/

It is also a good tool to use when keeping an keep an eye on throat erosion.

GWG19
11-02-2012, 18:35
First off you need to figure a budget.
Then ya gotta select a rifle. Right now Browning, Ruger, Savage ( probably the best value and accuracy), Winchester and Remington. Then you have Tikka, Sako and other European brands. The new Remington's seen tobe having some problems with quality and accuracy.
My favorite rifles are the Ruger #1's but you have to hand load and tune them.
I have had several Savage Rifles and they have been great shooters. A buddy of mine bought a Savage model 14 30-06. He routinely shoots 300 yards and drops deer with one shot. He has a bean field that is 400 yards wide. He catches deer cutting a corner. He uses 150 grain Remington core lock and has had no problems.
So first off pick a rifle.
Then a good scope. Stay away from Tasco, Simmons and other cheap scopes. Spend the money get a decent scope. I use Nikon on most of my guns including a Monarch African on a 450NE and one on a 45-400 NE. They are good glass a fair price.
Then get some good mounts Warn, Weaver, something that's is steel.
Mount it the right way. Contrary to popular belief you don't just tighten the screws down.
Then shoot a bunch on ammo and find out what your gun shoots the best groups with.
I heard a obserd statement today at the gun store. "Buy cheap ammo to sight in and get on the target, then sight in with this Brand. That brand may not shoot in that rifle.
If money is not an object or you want one rifle look at these guys.
http://www.gunwerks.com/
They are the real deal for long range hunting.

dougader
11-02-2012, 20:14
There must have been a lot of spoiled meat in that elk.

Not really.

noway
11-02-2012, 20:55
150 grain silvertips have worked extremely well for me here in Vermont.

bingo



I think alot of people over think this deer killing thing. A 30cal is not required nor does a bullet over 150grain. Plain jane grey box winchester or any generic hunting round for a think skinned animal is more than enough.

2afreedom
11-02-2012, 23:08
My .30-30 does just fine with Winchester 150gr soft points ($13/box). I'm sure the .30-06 would do great with them too.

orangeride
11-02-2012, 23:15
I've shot dozens of deer with my 30-06. Trust me, get some 150-180 nosler bt. I shoot 165's. they hit like Mack trucks. Don't get caught up in this "Premium bullet " bs. It's only needed when your shooting game that is a little large for the gun. Ie 243 for elk or bear. I've seen more deer lost because of tuff bullets. Also aim for the shoulder and brake um down. It will make tracking them a non issue. Also nosler's tend to always shoot pretty good in most guns. So do game kings.

SCmasterblaster
11-03-2012, 11:43
In a nut shell, you're loading one long, jamming it into the lands (it will seat the bullet deeper), measuring overall length and then backing off the desired amount.

On most Rem 700's I've seen, you can forget it. Too much freebore. The lands are too far away. A round loaded that long won't fit in the magazine. Other barrels, it's easier. You also have to deal with inconsistencies in ogive in any given batch of bullets.

Best advice is to just look up overall length that was tested by the bullet manufacturer and do that. Distance from the lands can make a difference, but it's way down the rabbit hole compared to finding a good powder / bullet combination.

This makes sense!

GWG19
11-03-2012, 13:46
Perfectly said - skill is far more important than the load out of 30-06. Deer are easy to kill - provided you make a clean shot.

That is a true statement. My go to hunting gun is a 25-06. The 120 grain bullet is what shoots the smallest groups and is at the top of chart for bullet weight in a 25-06. I have a buddy in NM that use this combination for elk hunting.

SCmasterblaster
11-03-2012, 14:04
That is a true statement. My go to hunting gun is a 25-06. The 120 grain bullet is what shoots the smallest groups and is at the top of chart for bullet weight in a 25-06. I have a buddy in NM that use this combination for elk hunting.

.25-06 for elk hunting? This must be a challenge.

GWG19
11-03-2012, 14:37
.25-06 for elk hunting? This must be a challenge.

Not as much as you think. The 264 is considered to be more than adequate for Moose and Stag in Europe. The differences are .007 in the bullet dia. and about 5 grains in bullet weight. You can step up to a 140 grain bullet in a 264.
The 25-06 loaded with a good bullet will the job very nicely. You load the Nosler 120 partitioned bullet to about 3200fps which is a warn load for the 25-06, but easy enough to obtain.
Shot placement and shot distance are important. No it is not a 400 yard Elk cartridge, like a 7mm Mag. Most people don't shoot that far any ways. The guides that I have hunted with told me the average shot on a elk is 130 to 180 yards.

Think about this the 30-30 was the hot bad ass cartridge once upon a time. People shot a bunch of elk with it. By today's standard it is fit for small white tails.

SCmasterblaster
11-03-2012, 15:04
Not as much as you think. The 264 is considered to be more than adequate for Moose and Stag in Europe. The differences are .007 in the bullet dia. and about 5 grains in bullet weight. You can step up to a 140 grain bullet in a 264.
The 25-06 loaded with a good bullet will the job very nicely. You load the Nosler 120 partitioned bullet to about 3200fps which is a warn load for the 25-06, but easy enough to obtain.
Shot placement and shot distance are important. No it is not a 400 yard Elk cartridge, like a 7mm Mag. Most people don't shoot that far any ways. The guides that I have hunted with told me the average shot on a elk is 130 to 180 yards.

Think about this the 30-30 was the hot bad ass cartridge once upon a time. People shot a bunch of elk with it. By today's standard it is fit for small white tails.

And the whitetails haven't gotten any bigger, have they?

ADK_40GLKr
11-03-2012, 19:11
.308 180 gr soft point got my buck this year. The kill shot was maybe 30 yards but a perfect broadside. Made a baseball sized exit wound through the rib cage. But very little meat damaged.

Too much power & too much bullet IMHO. Remainder of season, I'm using .223 HP in my Mini 14.

SCmasterblaster
11-04-2012, 14:16
.308 180 gr soft point got my buck this year. The kill shot was maybe 30 yards but a perfect broadside. Made a baseball sized exit wound through the rib cage. But very little meat damaged.

Too much power & too much bullet IMHO. Remainder of season, I'm using .223 HP in my Mini 14.

Congratulations! :supergrin:

PrecisionRifleman
11-04-2012, 15:45
Mark another one down for your "old school" soft point. As stated above, deer are not hard to put down so you don't need to spend $50 on a box of shells.

Also mentioned above (several times) are the Remington Core-Lokt cartridges. They just plain work, so if your rifle shoots them well I say just go for it. The 150 grain load is plenty for deer. Around here the Core Lokt ammo is always on sale around hunting season, too.

I used to hunt with a guy who had 2 huge heads mounted in his office. One was a moose and the other - just as large - was an elk. He had the bullet that he had shot the elk with in a little plastic bottle. It was the only core lokt bullet he ever recovered, and it had entered the elk's left rear hip on a quartering away shot and traveled diagonally up through the right lung and was found just under the hide on the right front shoulder. Both the left rear hip and right front leg were broken. The elk was dead by the time they walked up there... about an 80 yard shot.

I took the bullet home one afternoon to weigh it for Grover and was suprised to see that the 180 grain core lokt still weighed 160 grains. That's about 88% weight retention on a round that broke bones and penetrated a goodly amount. Textbook performance.

Using the Core-lokts on deer and hogs I go with a heavier bullet than I normally would to ensure that I don't blow the bullet up when taking a close range shot. Instead of going with 150gr I go with 165, and I
don't think a 180 in this bullet would be a bad choice either. I haven't had problems with 150gr Winchester Power Points blowing up at close range in my 20" LTR 308 Win, but Core-Lokts in a 24" barrel 30-06 in the 150gr weight tend to blow up and do not exit the hogs I've shot at up to 100 yards. Now each hog dropped on the spot so they are plenty, but I have a preference for my rounds to exit when taking a broad side shot.

Zombie Steve
11-04-2012, 19:19
Using the Core-lokts on deer and hogs I go with a heavier bullet than I normally would to ensure that I don't blow the bullet up when taking a close range shot. Instead of going with 150gr I go with 165, and I
don't think a 180 in this bullet would be a bad choice either. I haven't had problems with 150gr Winchester Power Points blowing up at close range in my 20" LTR 308 Win, but Core-Lokts in a 24" barrel 30-06 in the 150gr weight tend to blow up and do not exit the hogs I've shot at up to 100 yards. Now each hog dropped on the spot so they are plenty, but I have a preference for my rounds to exit when taking a broad side shot.

Agree wholeheartedly. That's why I don't like the ballistic silvertips. Not a particularly sturdy bullet construction. I've seen them knock the crap out of a muley, so I'd be lying if I said they "failed", but I'd rather get a little more penetration, which is why I like the Speer Grand Slams. Half dollar sized exit wound, and some balls to spare.

Years ago the Hornady manual used to list the purpose of the A-max bullet as target / hunting. Now they just show its purpose as target. Had a friend shoot a mule deer with a 168 A-max at about 50 yards. It pretty much behaved like a varmint bullet - just exploded. Again, dead deer, so it was a success, but it just destroyed the animal. Not pretty (although it was easy to track :supergrin:).

SCmasterblaster
11-04-2012, 20:21
Agree wholeheartedly. That's why I don't like the ballistic silvertips. Not a particularly sturdy bullet construction. I've seen them knock the crap out of a muley, so I'd be lying if I said they "failed", but I'd rather get a little more penetration, which is why I like the Speer Grand Slams. Half dollar sized exit wound, and some balls to spare.

Years ago the Hornady manual used to list the purpose of the A-max bullet as target / hunting. Now they just show its purpose as target. Had a friend shoot a mule deer with a 168 A-max at about 50 yards. It pretty much behaved like a varmint bullet - just exploded. Again, dead deer, so it was a success, but it just destroyed the animal. Not pretty (although it was easy to track :supergrin:).

You really know your ammo well, don't you ZS?

PrecisionRifleman
11-04-2012, 20:39
Agree wholeheartedly. That's why I don't like the ballistic silvertips. Not a particularly sturdy bullet construction. I've seen them knock the crap out of a muley, so I'd be lying if I said they "failed", but I'd rather get a little more penetration, which is why I like the Speer Grand Slams. Half dollar sized exit wound, and some balls to spare.

Years ago the Hornady manual used to list the purpose of the A-max bullet as target / hunting. Now they just show its purpose as target. Had a friend shoot a mule deer with a 168 A-max at about 50 yards. It pretty much behaved like a varmint bullet - just exploded. Again, dead deer, so it was a success, but it just destroyed the animal. Not pretty (although it was easy to track :supergrin:).

I haven't tried the Speer Grand Slams, but I do really like their 165gr BTSP loaded with a compressed load of RE15. I get excellent accuracy with this load, and it's moving along pretty well in my 20" barrel (2675fps). Speer makes very good bullets.

Zombie Steve
11-04-2012, 21:48
I haven't tried the Speer Grand Slams, but I do really like their 165gr BTSP loaded with a compressed load of RE15. I get excellent accuracy with this load, and it's moving along pretty well in my 20" barrel (2675fps). Speer makes very good bullets.

I don't expect to see grand slams or even mag-tips on the menu much longer. They really can produce the bonded deep curl bullets cheaper. I've just never tried them, and I probably won't - Nosler has me hooked on loading the Accubonds these days. I feel like loading a flat based bullet is a step back. Maybe unfounded, as the boat tail doesn't really start making much difference until you get out a few hundred yards. Well, they are easier to start in the case, anyway... :cool:

SCmasterblaster
11-05-2012, 10:00
I haven't tried the Speer Grand Slams, but I do really like their 165gr BTSP loaded with a compressed load of RE15. I get excellent accuracy with this load, and it's moving along pretty well in my 20" barrel (2675fps). Speer makes very good bullets.

Speer does indeed make good bullets. I am about to start reloading for my G17 now - Speer 115gr FMJs.

Zombie Steve
11-05-2012, 11:48
You really know your ammo well, don't you ZS?

Well, I suppose I'm an inch wide and a mile deep. I've done a lot of load development with 30 caliber bullets between range fodder for the M14 to "match" target loads to medium and heavy hunting loads, .308 to .300 RUM. If you asked me about a quarter bore or a 6.5mm, I would just be guessing.

:supergrin:

SCmasterblaster
11-05-2012, 16:40
Well, I suppose I'm an inch wide and a mile deep. I've done a lot of load development with 30 caliber bullets between range fodder for the M14 to "match" target loads to medium and heavy hunting loads, .308 to .300 RUM. If you asked me about a quarter bore or a 6.5mm, I would just be guessing.

:supergrin:

Have you ever reloaded .223/5.56mm?

Zombie Steve
11-05-2012, 17:13
Have you ever reloaded .223/5.56mm?

Yep. I have two loads - 55 grain fmj and a 69 grain Sierra Matchking. Found great loads right off the bat, both with Varget, and haven't done any load development since.

I will probably do a 50 grain hp load for p-dogs. I just don't shoot my .223's with much regularity.

SCmasterblaster
11-05-2012, 17:54
Yep. I have two loads - 55 grain fmj and a 69 grain Sierra Matchking. Found great loads right off the bat, both with Varget, and haven't done any load development since.

I will probably do a 50 grain hp load for p-dogs. I just don't shoot my .223's with much regularity.

Do you neck size, or full-length size?

Zombie Steve
11-05-2012, 19:02
Full length for AR's... Don't own a .223 bolt gun.

SCmasterblaster
11-07-2012, 11:03
Full length for AR's... Don't own a .223 bolt gun.

OIC! Happy shooting to you!

whitebread
11-09-2012, 22:36
Here is a 180 grain Barnes TTSX loaded to 2700fps from earlier tonight. ~45 yard shot. The deer didn't take a step...DRT.

Entrance wound

228941

Exit wound (broke his right leg)

228942

Zombie Steve
11-10-2012, 07:45
whitebread - do you run into really bad copper fouling with a solid copper bullet? I had a buddy give me a few hundred of the Nosler E-tips... I found a decent load, but it absolutely caked copper in the bore. :okie: The E-tips are gilding metal (copper / zinc). I never tried the Barnes bullets, but those are straight copper, right?

TBO
11-10-2012, 07:49
Some here use the Barnes all copper bullet, they don't complain about excessive copper.

Sent from the toe of my jack boot using Tapatalk 2

whitebread
11-10-2012, 08:25
whitebread - do you run into really bad copper fouling with a solid copper bullet? I had a buddy give me a few hundred of the Nosler E-tips... I found a decent load, but it absolutely caked copper in the bore. :okie: The E-tips are gilding metal (copper / zinc). I never tried the Barnes bullets, but those are straight copper, right?

Straight copper with a blue plastic tip (if you get the ballistic tipped instead of hollow point). I haven't noticed any copper fouling. My patches also don't have any of the green color that would indicate copper being left in the bore. They actually shoot A LOT cleaner than the factory loaded Federal Premium Sierra GameKing I used to hunt with. FWIW, I am using IMR 4064 and Federal 210 primers with the Barnes...not sure of that makes any difference with regards to copper fouling.

Brucev
11-10-2012, 12:47
going to be doing some whitetail hunting and need to get a good 30-06 load.

i know nothing about what grain or type of bullet for this, im more of a small game type of hunter.

i was told by my hunting buddies to look in the 150-165 grain market with a soft tip bullet, which narrows it down to about 150 different types of bullet / manufacturers...

please advise, links are welcomed...

I've been hunting whitetailed deer in the southeast U.S. for 33 years. Briefly I used a .243 Winchester Model 70. I decided I wanted a little more power/bullet weight so I went to the .30-06 Springfield. I've not used anything else. I have used this round in Ruger and Remington rifles as well as surplus military rifles specifically 1903 and 1903-A3 rifles as well as M-1917 Enfield rifles. I have used this round in M-1 Garand rifles. Results have been superlative.

Whitetail deer are not heavily boned. Even a large buck will seldom weigh more than 200 lbs. in the southeastern United States. I have used bullets in weights from 150 to 180 grains. I've settled on the 150 and just about ideal. I've not ever had a problem with inadequate penetration using a Remington or Winchester 150 gr. .30-06 load. In fact, I've not ever recovered a bullet as it always goes in one side of the deer and out the other side.

The last deer I shot was hit just in front of the left hip. The bullet rakes up through the deer and exited out the right front shoulder. The bullet was a plain Jane Remington 150 gr. Pointed Soft-Point (PSP). The distance was 181 paces using a Smith Corona 1903-A3 rifle with the standard iron sights.

390ish
11-10-2012, 15:07
When I hunted with 30-06 for deer I really liked the Federal premium loaded with the 165 grain Sierra. It would expand, not explode and go through both sides of the deer at every range I shot. I had bad experiences with the ballistic tips when they first came out with bullets blowing up. Killed the deer but lost a lot of meat. I am a shoulder shooter because I don't like chasing deer. I understand the ballistic tips are tougher now, but I just shy away from them.

SCmasterblaster
11-15-2012, 16:43
I've been hunting whitetailed deer in the southeast U.S. for 33 years. Briefly I used a .243 Winchester Model 70. I decided I wanted a little more power/bullet weight so I went to the .30-06 Springfield. I've not used anything else. I have used this round in Ruger and Remington rifles as well as surplus military rifles specifically 1903 and 1903-A3 rifles as well as M-1917 Enfield rifles. I have used this round in M-1 Garand rifles. Results have been superlative.

Whitetail deer are not heavily boned. Even a large buck will seldom weigh more than 200 lbs. in the southeastern United States. I have used bullets in weights from 150 to 180 grains. I've settled on the 150 and just about ideal. I've not ever had a problem with inadequate penetration using a Remington or Winchester 150 gr. .30-06 load. In fact, I've not ever recovered a bullet as it always goes in one side of the deer and out the other side.

The last deer I shot was hit just in front of the left hip. The bullet rakes up through the deer and exited out the right front shoulder. The bullet was a plain Jane Remington 150 gr. Pointed Soft-Point (PSP). The distance was 181 paces using a Smith Corona 1903-A3 rifle with the standard iron sights.

I guess that it helps to know deer anatomy if one is going to hunt them.

superspud
11-19-2012, 10:28
update:

went hunting out in west texas over the weekend and wanted to report back to this thread. I was set on a Hornady Interlock 165gr but ended up going with the tried and true Remington Core Lokt in 165. It was considerably less expensive and ive heard decent things about it.

I assumed spotting duties most of the weekend but decided to take a doe toward the end of the day. We spotted one walking toward the top of a ridge so i sighted it in and fired. I didnt realize exactly how far away it was at the time, i aimed at his head because it was walking but the bullet hit on her front shoulder dropping her immediately.

as it turns out, it was a little over 300 yards away once we walked it off, i was pretty impressed.

as most of you have stated, the 30-06 is more than enough caliber to take down a whitetail. most of the guys who were out with us were using a .270. The 165 Core Lokt made a clean entry and exit, didnt really blow any part of the deer apart leaving the meat intact.

thanks for the help :)

Zombie Steve
11-19-2012, 10:39
Congratulations!

We want pics!

PrecisionRifleman
11-19-2012, 11:07
Congratulations!! I'm glad everything came together for you!! Awesome!

posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire (http://www.outdoorhub.com/mobile/)

superspud
11-19-2012, 11:56
no pix unfortunately. was actually a little too excited to even remember to take a pic lol.

rookie mistake.

SCmasterblaster
11-19-2012, 13:26
And I want to use my 12-ga Mossberg M500 with slugs. :cool:

pmcjury
11-20-2012, 08:10
What does everyone think about 30-06 loaded with 125Gr Hollow points loaded to about 3100 fps.

I've got some land that I have access to opened up to rifle hunting and I am curious if that would be a good white tail load. It seems like it be plenty of power, but I am alittle concerned about it doing to much damage to meat. I figured I would check with you guys

Zombie Steve
11-20-2012, 08:24
What does everyone think about 30-06 loaded with 125Gr Hollow points loaded to about 3100 fps.

I've got some land that I have access to opened up to rifle hunting and I am curious if that would be a good white tail load. It seems like it be plenty of power, but I am alittle concerned about it doing to much damage to meat. I figured I would check with you guys

Sounds like a good load for wood chucks, coyote and other varmints. I think the bullet will come apart very quickly on a deer. I think it would make quite a mess and not penetrate well.

ithaca_deerslayer
11-20-2012, 09:00
I have often wondered what deer hunters do to take deer without too much meat damage. Is most of the meat far away from the heart-lung wound channel?

If a deer is standing broadside to you, shoot it just an inch or two behind the shoulder. You want to get close to that shoulder, but not hit it. Too far back and you got guts and a wounded deer with a lot of tracking all day and the next day. Hit that shoulder and you are going to ruin meat.

Up and down (meaning vertically), your shot would ideally be below the middle of the body, about 2/3 the way down from the top of the deer's back. But a center hit vertically would be fine, too.

Just do NOT do a center hit left and right (meaning horizontally). The bullet will be too far back of the vitals. Instead, very important to get as CLOSE to the shoulder as you can without actually hitting the shoulder.

What you want, in my opinion, is for both lungs to be blown through. You want a hole through one side of the ribcage near the shoulder, and out the other side of the ribcage near the shoulder. When you gut the deer, the stomach and intestines will be intact, and the lung area be a bloody mess. And all the shoulder meat will be untouched.

If you hit the heart, great, but that sits just a tad low and forward, kinda partially blocked by the shoulder and elbow. When I say "shoulder", I'm including the shoulder bone that goes all the way down to the elbow.

When the deer isn't directly broadside to you, it gets harder. You have to change your point of aim so the bullet draws a line through th inside of what I've described.

Personally, I say just wait for the perfect broadside shot. Bowhunting teaches you that.

I'm not sure why anyone takes crazy ass shots at deer. I guess they are so desparate to shoot. Hunt the darn thing, get it into that perfect broadside position, then place your well aimed shot.

dkf
11-20-2012, 09:08
What does everyone think about 30-06 loaded with 125Gr Hollow points loaded to about 3100 fps.

For deer you are better off with a bonded pointed soft point with that weight bullet.

pmcjury
11-20-2012, 09:56
Sounds like a good load for wood chucks, coyote and other varmints. I think the bullet will come apart very quickly on a deer. I think it would make quite a mess and not penetrate well.

OK that is sort of what I was thinking. I've got a bunch of corelokt, fusion, and hand loaded sp, and sierra game kings in different weights between 150-180 grains

SCmasterblaster
11-21-2012, 14:01
For deer you are better off with a bonded pointed soft point with that weight bullet.

So true!

dougader
11-21-2012, 17:15
update:
...ended up going with the tried and true Remington Core Lokt in 165. It was considerably less expensive and ive heard decent things about it.

That's the thing about those Core Lokt bullets. They just plain work, and usually cost less than some of the latest and greatest you see advertised all over the place.

kmrcstintn
11-24-2012, 11:12
my .30-06 is the Remington 760 that was my dad's before his passing...

for decades, his 'standard' load was the Remington Core-Lokt 150gr pointed soft point; when his shoulder couldn't take the recoil in later years, I had a Limbsaver recoil pad fitted and switched him over to Remington Core-Lokt 'Managed Recoil' 125gr pointed soft points...less perceived recoil than 150gr .30-30 in the Marlin 336 I owned at the time

if I use his rifle, I will stick with the Managed Recoil ammo since the rifle likes it alot :cool:

ithaca_deerslayer
11-24-2012, 11:14
my .30-06 is the Remington 760 that was my dad's before his passing...

for decades, his 'standard' load was the Remington Core-Lokt 150gr pointed soft point; when his shoulder couldn't take the recoil in later years, I had a Limbsaver recoil pad fitted and switched him over to Remington Core-Lokt 'Managed Recoil' 125gr pointed soft points...less perceived recoil than 150gr .30-30 in the Marlin 336 I owned at the time

if I use his rifle, I will stick with the Managed Recoil ammo since the rifle likes it alot :cool:

And you still got more velocity than an AK :)

kmrcstintn
11-25-2012, 12:23
unfortunately I can't find the original mags to my dad's Remington 760 (and the replacements I ordered @ 2 weeks ago haven't arrived yet), so if I go out for PA's firearm season I'll be toting my Savage 111G in .25-06 and the load I've got sighted in for it is Winchester Super-X 90gr positive expansion point: http://www.winchester.com/Products/rifle-ammunition/Performance/Super-X-rifle/Pages/default.aspx?c=25-06+Remington (a bit light, but I stocked up and have 7 boxes of it -- and I'm on a tight budget right now to stay afloat)

the alternative is using my Benelli Nova 12ga pump thumper (using the 2 beads on the rib for aiming) shooting Brenneke K.O slugs: http://www.brennekeusa.com/cms/ko.html

or Brenneke Tactical Home Defense slugs: http://www.brennekeusa.com/cms/l_tactical_home_defense.html

K.Kiser
11-25-2012, 13:05
I'll be toting my Savage 111G in .25-06 and the load I've got sighted in for it is Winchester Super-X 90gr positive expansion point

Aim for the neck with that bullet, or a nicely placed heart shot... We've lost more deer with light bulleted 25-06's than any other caliber we've had, and over the last 25 years it's been close to 100 rifles in at least a few dozen calibers..
They were strange results as some would drop on the spot I guess if the right nerve cluster was effected, and some were lung shot and would run for hundreds of yards I guess to the bullet hitting a rib or something..

We heavied up to a 115 gr Barnes or 120 gr Partition and never had another get out of sight..

With the 90 grainers a neck shot was a bang/flop impact everytime though..

SCmasterblaster
11-25-2012, 20:47
Aim for the neck with that bullet, or a nicely placed heart shot... We've lost more deer with light bulleted 25-06's than any other caliber we've had, and over the last 25 years it's been close to 100 rifles in at least a few dozen calibers..
They were strange results as some would drop on the spot I guess if the right nerve cluster was effected, and some were lung shot and would run for hundreds of yards I guess to the bullet hitting a rib or something..

We heavied up to a 115 gr Barnes or 120 gr Partition and never had another get out of sight..

With the 90 grainers a neck shot was a bang/flop impact everytime though..

Are you aiming for the high side of the neck, attempting to break the spine?

K.Kiser
11-25-2012, 21:41
Are you aiming for the high side of the neck, attempting to break the spine?

Anywhere in the upper 1/2 and the shock handles the rest... The 90 grainers do pack a helluva pop, it's just the off angle/ quartering shots or bone collisions that gave us trouble...

I was thinking about my previous post, and I really need to back up sometimes... I forget that alot of these events are no newer than 17-18 years old, and bullet construction has improved quite a bit.. The 90 grainers kmrcstintn is referring too may work just fine.. I don't have any knowledge of that bullet and I may be speaking or typing to someone that knows 3x what I do..

noway
11-25-2012, 22:09
If a deer is standing broadside to you, shoot it just an inch or two behind the shoulder. You want to get close to that shoulder, but not hit it. Too far back and you got guts and a wounded deer with a lot of tracking all day and the next day. Hit that shoulder and you are going to ruin meat.

Up and down (meaning vertically), your shot would ideally be below the middle of the body, about 2/3 the way down from the top of the deer's back. But a center hit vertically would be fine, too.

Just do NOT do a center hit left and right (meaning horizontally). The bullet will be too far back of the vitals. Instead, very important to get as CLOSE to the shoulder as you can without actually hitting the shoulder.

What you want, in my opinion, is for both lungs to be blown through. You want a hole through one side of the ribcage near the shoulder, and out the other side of the ribcage near the shoulder. When you gut the deer, the stomach and intestines will be intact, and the lung area be a bloody mess. And all the shoulder meat will be untouched.

If you hit the heart, great, but that sits just a tad low and forward, kinda partially blocked by the shoulder and elbow. When I say "shoulder", I'm including the shoulder bone that goes all the way down to the elbow.

When the deer isn't directly broadside to you, it gets harder. You have to change your point of aim so the bullet draws a line through th inside of what I've described.

Personally, I say just wait for the perfect broadside shot. Bowhunting teaches you that.

I'm not sure why anyone takes crazy ass shots at deer. I guess they are so desparate to shoot. Hunt the darn thing, get it into that perfect broadside position, then place your well aimed shot.

Very well spoken & done :wavey:

One should study the deer anatomy. In your description of the shoulder or elbow, that might be confusing to some since it's the top of the leg and it partially hides the heart.

Anything in the lung/heart area is going to drop a deer with a 30-06, if not DRT than it will be expired no more than 100yrds away from a broadside.

Any std hunting 30-06 bullet will be ideal for deer and to create the best kill with no or little lost of meat.

Here's a link that might shed some better light on the deer anatomy

http://martinarchery.com/mtechforum/showthread.php?24396-Deer-anatomy-and-shot-placement

It's greared for bowhunters but is beneficial for all.

kmrcstintn
11-26-2012, 01:01
I use this interactive tool to 'prep' for archery hunting in the past and I still challenge myself from time to time: http://www.bowsite.com/bowsite/features/articles/deer/deergeometry/

hhmmm...sounds like 12ga, slugs, and 50 yards shots might be best...but I would have liked a more precise aiming system than dots on the barrel rib; guess I could sacrifice a box and do a quick session with a target at 50 yds...

390ish
11-26-2012, 07:36
I am big proponent of the 25-06, but the bullet I have shot deer with is the 100 grain Hornady spire point. It is a tough soft point designed for the 257 Weatherby. I shoulder shoot deer with it. No complaints. I would not use a softer bullet than this on deer. Runs projectiles at about the same velocity as a 223 shooting 53-55 grainers.

SCmasterblaster
11-29-2012, 09:36
I use this interactive tool to 'prep' for archery hunting in the past and I still challenge myself from time to time: http://www.bowsite.com/bowsite/features/articles/deer/deergeometry/

hhmmm...sounds like 12ga, slugs, and 50 yards shots might be best...but I would have liked a more precise aiming system than dots on the barrel rib; guess I could sacrifice a box and do a quick session with a target at 50 yds...

I'll be getting an aimpoint for my Mossberg 500.