Thought the 36 problems were fixed. [Archive] - Glock Talk

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christoph4
11-09-2012, 10:43
After much consideration, I decided to buy a 36. Took it to the range and it jammed constantly using AE 230 fmj. I have used this in my 21 with no problems. No limp wristing either. I thought the issues were resolved. Contacted Glock and my parts are up do date. Is the 36 that sensitive to ammo? I will try diff ammo next week but I no longer have the confidence in it to bet my life on. Any advise before I trade it in?

ChiefWPD
11-09-2012, 10:49
I had a model 36 some years ago. I never could get it to function. I sent it back to Glock four times. They never got it to work and they finally sent me a new model 23 which works just fine. Disappointed in the model 36 and sorry it seems to be such a problem design.

Oh, and a buddy of mine has one that works just fine!

Georg of Ohio
11-09-2012, 11:26
My Glock 36 have eaten everything which I have tried, with no jams (I will not carry any semi-auto pistol until I run at least 200-300 rounds thru it).I have heard of some problems with the older models, what is the DOB on your 36?

I suggest that you should have someone else try it; it may be the smaller grip size.

If you trade it off, are you going to stick with Glock? IMHO the other Glock 45s are too fat as a EDC, but to each his own.

Atlas
11-09-2012, 15:22
Both my G36's run any ammo I've tried.

bunk22
11-09-2012, 19:12
I bought a brand new G36 back in Aug 2010 and was by far the worst handgun I've owned. It choked on every type of ammo, even with with various shooters. I got rid of it quickly but I don't think it's common, I think I got on of the lemons.

Glock Master
11-09-2012, 19:21
I've had zero problems with my G36.

GlockRWH
11-09-2012, 19:33
Unfortunately its the only Glock pistol I've ever experienced multiple FTFs with. I was shocked the first few times it happened.
I have owned many Glocks over the years and the G36 is definitely a different animal.

I tested several types of .45ACP and it did well with the defensive ammo, but I can't trust a pistol that doesn't digest most ammo.

I do love my G26/G17/G34. The 36 just wasn't for me.

And no... I wasn't limp wristing it. :dunno:

Redstate
11-09-2012, 20:05
My G36 runs perfectly when I shoot it. Not the case for my friend when he shoots my G36; however, he has no problems when he shoots his G19 and G34. The G36 is a lot of pistol in a small package.

bunk22
11-09-2012, 20:30
My G36 runs perfectly when I shoot it. Not the case for my friend when he shoots my G36; however, he has no problems when he shoots his G19 and G34. The G36 is a lot of pistol in a small package.

Not always the case, it's not always the shooter. There have been some defective G36's.

WinterWizard
11-09-2012, 23:59
There have been a few G36s that had issues, therefore, according to the Internet, it's a problem design and every G36 has issues.

By that logic, every G19 gen 4 is a P.O.S. because a few have had brass to the face and erratic ejection issues.

Also, some Toyota Camrys had issues a while back, therefore every Toyota from now until the end of time is a P.O.S.

ETC, ETC, ETC...

WinterWizard
11-10-2012, 00:01
By the by, another post from a new user ripping a major competitor (the G36) to the new Springfield XDs.

The G36 doesn't have issues on the whole. You just have issues with yours, or you are a paid poster.

buckshotshorty
11-10-2012, 12:47
What is AE ammo? Maybe that's the problem. Did you try any other ammo?

MikeG36
11-10-2012, 13:19
AE (American Eagle?) Have you tried higher quaility and or other brands of ammo?

My G36 so far has eaten everything I've fed to it without a problem. My Dan Wesson and Colt Gold Cup custom shop both had trouble with American Eagle but they're usually happy with WWB.

I wish you the best of luck sorting this out.

F106 Fan
11-10-2012, 13:29
Try some different ammo!

You will also want to try whatever SD ammo you intend to use.

Get a few hundred rounds through it and see if it works better. That's easier if you reload but, still, 10 boxes of Federal Champion (Wally World) won't really break the bank.

BTW, I want a G36. My Gen 3 G21SF has eaten all my reloads including the 200 gr LSWC which is notoriously hard to feed. I want the thin frame/slide of the G36 for carry so I'll be hoping you get this resolved without having to send the gun to Glock.

I have put off buying a couple of Glocks until all the uproar dies away.

Keep us posted with your results with other ammo.

Richard

Tarowah
11-10-2012, 22:09
I replaced the extractor with a non LCI and I never had another issue with mine, it was sold to me because it had the fail to extract problem and I knew it when I bought it, I have since sold it and the new owner has never had an issue.

mj9mm
11-10-2012, 22:39
got my G36 this past summer, easily over a thousand rounds through it not one failure of any kind. shoots everything i've put through it, though for price i buy more Tulammo than any other. it hasn't disapointed me:cool:

English
11-11-2012, 08:40
By the by, another post from a new user ripping a major competitor (the G36) to the new Springfield XDs.

The G36 doesn't have issues on the whole. You just have issues with yours, or you are a paid poster.

I have read posts about defective G36s since long before the comparable XD existed. Throughout that time people with no understanding of the meaning of evidence have insisted that all G36s must be OK because their G36 is OK.

The reality is that many defective G36s have been bounced back and forth between the owner and Glock with Glcok claiming that nothing is wrong when the evidence of videos of a G36 jamming show no sign of limp wristing, which is the usual excuse given by thse who think all G36s are perfect. There has been no notification of a fix for the problem and no sign of Glock fixing bad pistols on the quiet. Of course, Glock now have a whole bunch of other models with ejection problems.

On one occasion an owner took Glock to court and won, but really it should have been a class action for many shooters with lawyers who could really hurt Glock. Then we probably would not be having the problems that amny are now having.

English

Darkangel1846
11-11-2012, 10:24
Never had a problem with my G36, several ammo different mags.

Redstate
11-11-2012, 10:25
This is a follow-up to my earlier post about my friend that always jams my G36, while I and others that have shot it have no problem. As stated, he shoots his G34 and G19 without problem. Also, when he shoots my G27, he jams it.
I think his issue is that he does not have a high enough grip on the pistol, something he can get away with on the 9 mms.
I am not saying that the original poster has issues with his grip of the G36 (I guess it is possible that he got one that has some part that is not functioning properly).
Bottom line is that I don't think the G36 has any kind of inherent issue. The G36 is a fine pistol that, in my case, as well as probably the case with a very great percentage of owners, is perfectly reliable.

markerbeacon
11-11-2012, 17:43
After much consideration, I decided to buy a 36. Took it to the range and it jammed constantly using AE 230 fmj. I have used this in my 21 with no problems. No limp wristing either. I thought the issues were resolved. Contacted Glock and my parts are up do date. Is the 36 that sensitive to ammo? I will try diff ammo next week but I no longer have the confidence in it to bet my life on. Any advise before I trade it in?

I’ve had my Glock 36 for about 2 months. I used several different Ammo Brands with no (Ammo related) issues. Currently using RWS. $17.50 a box.

I did have one problem with the G-36. I bought an extended slide lock lever from the Glockstore. I installed it and almost immediately I had problems with it returning to battery. I believe the problem was with the extended slide lock lever.

I took it off, reinstalled the OEM extended slide lock lever, problem went away. I fired 100 rounds through it this morning without on issue.

butcher_block
11-11-2012, 20:16
love mine had mayeb 2 fails in the first 200 rounds but the last 1k have been fine including CCI shot shells (had a chipmunk problem ) i could have run mag after mag of them

WinterWizard
11-11-2012, 22:10
I have read posts about defective G36s since long before the comparable XD existed. Throughout that time people with no understanding of the meaning of evidence have insisted that all G36s must be OK because their G36 is OK.

The reality is that many defective G36s have been bounced back and forth between the owner and Glock with Glcok claiming that nothing is wrong when the evidence of videos of a G36 jamming show no sign of limp wristing, which is the usual excuse given by thse who think all G36s are perfect. There has been no notification of a fix for the problem and no sign of Glock fixing bad pistols on the quiet. Of course, Glock now have a whole bunch of other models with ejection problems.

On one occasion an owner took Glock to court and won, but really it should have been a class action for many shooters with lawyers who could really hurt Glock. Then we probably would not be having the problems that amny are now having.

English

I don't dispute that. But by that logic, every gun model that has ever had an issue and that issue has been reported on the errorwebs, then that model is a problem gun and none of them will function correctly, and we should all sue, even if our guns are perfect.

I am sorry, I have a problem with people who sign up for the sole purpose to whine about their gun. Introduce yourself, make some meaningful posts, then whine about the Glock you own on a Glock forum.

A G36 problem thread pops up every once in a while. Some are people whining about the same gun or problem they had YEARS ago. Hence, that rehashing reinvigorates the "G36 problem child" myth that only exists because of the Internet.

Lets count the number of G36 problem threads compared to the number of gen 4 9mm problems threads. Yet, one is a great gun and one is a "problem child." Give me a freaking break.

English
11-12-2012, 04:30
I don't dispute that. But by that logic, every gun model that has ever had an issue and that issue has been reported on the errorwebs, then that model is a problem gun and none of them will function correctly, and we should all sue, even if our guns are perfect.

I am sorry, I have a problem with people who sign up for the sole purpose to whine about their gun. Introduce yourself, make some meaningful posts, then whine about the Glock you own on a Glock forum.

A G36 problem thread pops up every once in a while. Some are people whining about the same gun or problem they had YEARS ago. Hence, that rehashing reinvigorates the "G36 problem child" myth that only exists because of the Internet.

Lets count the number of G36 problem threads compared to the number of gen 4 9mm problems threads. Yet, one is a great gun and one is a "problem child." Give me a freaking break.

No. Any manufacturer with any model can produce the occasional bad one. In most cases that problem is rapidly corrected by the factory on a piece by piece basis and in some cases a recall notice is issued, as with the recent Ruger 9mm. In the case of the G36, Glock have never provided a solution and this has been going on for over a decade.

Any self loading combat pistol should be able to reload itself when the shooter has a moderately poor grip because combat means that the shooter can be firing from awkward positions when wounded. Perfect stances and grips are things of the target range! A pistol with marginal self loading reliability will shoot well with a good grip and erratically with a poor grip, but this does not mean that it is the fault of the shooter. It is still a pistol fault.

I don't have a G36 and don't want one for reasons that have nothing to do with reliability, but all my Glocks are completely reliable so I am not whining about my pistols. Unfortunately Glock now has another extraction/ejection problem that after about a year and a half it remains unable to fix. It has produced several different components, RSAs, ejectors and extractors, but the problem persists. What I was saying about a class action was that if there had been one on the faulty G36s they would then have been more careful about testing changes to existing models and would not now be in this situaion.

Diamond Back produced a very nicely designed pocket pistol which was released without sufficient testing. The result has been outrage at its high level of unreliability, though some work well. Glock has released models with very minor changes which have also caused problems which were not detected pre production, but this has cause no more than localised outrage and considerable expense for owners. Yet people like you are whining about people with Glock pistols with real problems having the effrontery to complain about them.

Think about it a little as though the problem was happening to you.

English

fastbolt
11-12-2012, 13:34
I know of 2 Glock employees who carry G36's. I doubt either would carry one if there were some inherent problem with the model.

It's not uncommon for some shooters to report occasional stoppages or malfunctions when shooting increasingly diminutive .45 pistols, even when they experience no such problems with "full-size" .45's. The use of less costly ammunition which might border on the lower end of the normal velocity range for .45 ACP may occasionally complicate things, too.

I've only handled a few G36's over the years, and watched some other owners shoot them. None of them exhibited any feeding/functioning issues in my hands, using an assortment of available training & duty ammunition.

The owner of one of the G36's I tried reported consistent feeding problems when he fired it (although it didn't act up for him that day when he was qualifying with it while I watched). Even though it worked fine in my hands, he took it to a Glock armorer at another agency. That armorer told him that the G36 seemed just fine, although it was a bit dry, and he recommended the owner properly lubricate it. The owner eventually traded the G36 and bought something else (not a Glock).

I'm not surprised when a diminutive .45 might exhibit a "preference" or "dislike" for one or another brand or loading of ammunition. Getting proper slide velocity is one of the critical influences involved with obtaining optimal functioning. So too, unfortunately, is shooter grip technique (which might be fine for a larger .45, but not necessarily for a smaller .45, for that shooter).

In just about all of the pistol armorer classes I've attended over the years (and those classes included 4 different types of plastic-framed pistols), stoppages and functioning problems potentially caused by an improper shooter grip technique were mentioned during the class, and listed in most of the armorer manuals under the problem diagnostic/correction sections. Even with metal-framed pistols.

I already own some smallish non-Glock .45's (3.25", 3.5" & 3.75" barrels), so I've never bought a G36, myself. I've come close, but just never got around to adding one to my collection. (I have, however, been thinking about picking up a M&P 45c, to complement my FS model. :) Go figure. That would round out my .45's for barrel length, giving me a 4" model to fit between the 3.75 & 4.25" guns.)

I'd not hesitate to buy one based upon any concern that it was a "problematic model", though.

rlcoy58
11-12-2012, 14:28
fastbolt, very good post,as an owner of a no problem G36,I agree with you 100%.

SCmasterblaster
11-12-2012, 16:56
Are G36s offered in the 4th Gen style?

Redstate
11-12-2012, 17:13
Are G36s offered in the 4th Gen style?

Short answer, no.

philbun
11-12-2012, 17:26
Love my 36 no problems

WinterWizard
11-13-2012, 01:06
No. Any manufacturer with any model can produce the occasional bad one. In most cases that problem is rapidly corrected by the factory on a piece by piece basis and in some cases a recall notice is issued, as with the recent Ruger 9mm. In the case of the G36, Glock have never provided a solution and this has been going on for over a decade.

Can you provide documentation that substantiates your claim that the G36 is a problem gun with a design flaw that has persisted for over a decade?

Or is it just the unfortunate few who got a bad G36 (can happen with any gun, even any Glock) persist in whining about it for over a decade? :rofl:

I can't wait for 2022, when the Internet myth will be floating around that ALL early gen 4, 9mm Glocks ejected brass to the face and/or stovepiped with range ammo. Ha ha ha!

What a joke...

English
11-13-2012, 06:36
Can you provide documentation that substantiates your claim that the G36 is a problem gun with a design flaw that has persisted for over a decade?

Or is it just the unfortunate few who got a bad G36 (can happen with any gun, even any Glock) persist in whining about it for over a decade? :rofl:

I can't wait for 2022, when the Internet myth will be floating around that ALL early gen 4, 9mm Glocks ejected brass to the face and/or stovepiped with range ammo. Ha ha ha!

What a joke...

Don't be silly. This is the internet. All I have done is read detailed descriptions of people's problems with the G36 in which they have gone to great lengths and considerable expense to fix their problem pistols without success and where they have been given a consistent runaround by Glock. They have also been consistently abused by people like you who think there is no real problem because they have a G36 with no problem. This has continued even when they have made videos showing very well controlled muzzle flip with several jams per magazine.

If this were, as you suggest, just the ocasional problem in manufacture rather than a fundamental fault that shows itself randomly, then Glock would have produced a fix for it and I would not be writing about the G36 in this thread. I have already said in a post above that any manufacturer can produce a lemon from time to time, but this is not that. The fact that yet another purchaser of a G36 is having precisely the same problem with a new G36 shows that they have not fixed their production any more than they have produced fixes for older pistols.

If this was just an unfortunate manufacturing problem, Glock would have an established system to deal with it. They have no such thing and now they have no such thing for the ejection problems with some Gen4 and late Gen 3 pistols in at least 9mm and .40S&W. This time they are trying, but they are trying with remarkably little intelligence and no success.

Your silly idea about the reputation of Gen4 pistols in 2022 is not worth comment but let me ask you a simple related question. Glocks have been around for about 30 years and the internet has been around for a good part of that time. A major factor in their success has been their reputation for the highest level of reliability. That reputation was deserved and has been promulgated via the internet. Do you think that would have happened if their reliability had been what it is now? I think the answer to that is that the internet would have used that poor reliability to rubbish all plastic pistols. Glock would now be a small player like Charter Arms, or broke and S&W would still be making only all metal pistols. Do tell us your answer.

I find this extremely sad because my Glocks are close to my favourite pistols, but things are rarely improved by pretending that their problems do not exist. This is a mind set which has been endemic at Glock for a long time. They have a reputation for never admitting to mistakes. Once you put on that public persona for long enough it penetrates back through the organization and as well as never admitting fault to the public, engineers stop admitting fault to their managers and lower level managers stop admitting fault to their upper managers.

English

captcurly
11-13-2012, 10:49
I first started carrying a 36 2/2002 and now I am on my second G36. Never had a problem either gun and they ate any type of ammo I shot. Too bad some of you have had problems. IMHO the 36 is the best concealed carry 45ACP pistol on the planet.

WinterWizard
11-15-2012, 01:27
Don't be silly. This is the internet. All I have done is read detailed descriptions of people's problems with the G36 in which they have gone to great lengths and considerable expense to fix their problem pistols without success and where they have been given a consistent runaround by Glock. They have also been consistently abused by people like you who think there is no real problem because they have a G36 with no problem. This has continued even when they have made videos showing very well controlled muzzle flip with several jams per magazine.

If this were, as you suggest, just the ocasional problem in manufacture rather than a fundamental fault that shows itself randomly, then Glock would have produced a fix for it and I would not be writing about the G36 in this thread. I have already said in a post above that any manufacturer can produce a lemon from time to time, but this is not that. The fact that yet another purchaser of a G36 is having precisely the same problem with a new G36 shows that they have not fixed their production any more than they have produced fixes for older pistols.

If this was just an unfortunate manufacturing problem, Glock would have an established system to deal with it. They have no such thing and now they have no such thing for the ejection problems with some Gen4 and late Gen 3 pistols in at least 9mm and .40S&W. This time they are trying, but they are trying with remarkably little intelligence and no success.

Your silly idea about the reputation of Gen4 pistols in 2022 is not worth comment but let me ask you a simple related question. Glocks have been around for about 30 years and the internet has been around for a good part of that time. A major factor in their success has been their reputation for the highest level of reliability. That reputation was deserved and has been promulgated via the internet. Do you think that would have happened if their reliability had been what it is now? I think the answer to that is that the internet would have used that poor reliability to rubbish all plastic pistols. Glock would now be a small player like Charter Arms, or broke and S&W would still be making only all metal pistols. Do tell us your answer.

I find this extremely sad because my Glocks are close to my favourite pistols, but things are rarely improved by pretending that their problems do not exist. This is a mind set which has been endemic at Glock for a long time. They have a reputation for never admitting to mistakes. Once you put on that public persona for long enough it penetrates back through the organization and as well as never admitting fault to the public, engineers stop admitting fault to their managers and lower level managers stop admitting fault to their upper managers.

English

So in other words, you read about a few people who have problems with their guns and without any substantiation, concluded that the G36 has a fundamental flaw, and Glock has been selling it with that fundamental flaw for over ten years with no legal or market place repercussions of any kind? You do realize that if a product has a funamental design or manufacturing flaw, it affects EVERY, or almost every, item made, right? Thank you for verifying for me and everyone reading that you are full of bull. :rofl:

By the by, I treat Glocks like any pistol. After buying one, I test it for reliability. After a 500 round break in, I expect it to go at least 500 more without a single malfunction with any type or brand of ammo before I would trust it. If it fails, I sell it. I don't care what type or brand of pistol it is – if it fails, it fails, and I have no use for it. My Glocks have not let me down yet. So, actually, I don't care what other people's experiences are. Worry about your own problems, not others', especially random strangers from the Internet who you know nothing about.

English
11-15-2012, 09:25
So in other words, you read about a few people who have problems with their guns and without any substantiation, concluded that the G36 has a fundamental flaw, and Glock has been selling it with that fundamental flaw for over ten years with no legal or market place repercussions of any kind? You do realize that if a product has a funamental design or manufacturing flaw, it affects EVERY, or almost every, item made, right? Thank you for verifying for me and everyone reading that you are full of bull. :rofl:

By the by, I treat Glocks like any pistol. After buying one, I test it for reliability. After a 500 round break in, I expect it to go at least 500 more without a single malfunction with any type or brand of ammo before I would trust it. If it fails, I sell it. I don't care what type or brand of pistol it is if it fails, it fails, and I have no use for it. My Glocks have not let me down yet. So, actually, I don't care what other people's experiences are. Worry about your own problems, not others', especially random strangers from the Internet who you know nothing about.

No, I read a relatively large number of posts which were intelligently written describing the problems they had had. Those problems were completely consistent. In the same threads I read an even larger number of dumb posts by people who have the strange idea that if theirs works, they must all work as well. It was not hard to decide which were more likely to be a reflection of the true state of G36 reliability.

Neither I nor anyone else as far as I know has said that all G36s are faulty and clearly the majority have worked well. As well as your other errors, mass produced items with faults of design or manufacturing do not all exhibit the fault. Not all mass produced items of a particular product are actually identical and minor manufactuting variances can result in a proportion of items with problems. If this was not so then no big manufacturers would ever have model problems which they have to rectify because it would be easy to detect those problems in the prototype and early production testing phase. As it is, all large car manufacturers have had recalls, some for dangerous faults, and they have far more engineers and far more money to spend on testing than Glock.

You don't have the wit to know what you are talking about or to know when you need to stop talking.

By the way, when you sell the guns you find unreliable, do you tell the buyer the problem or do you just think that it is now his problem?

English

WinterWizard
11-16-2012, 00:15
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Uploaded with ImageShack.us (http://imageshack.us)

Roger1079
11-16-2012, 04:00
Don't be silly. This is the internet. All I have done is read detailed descriptions of people's problems with the G36 in which they have gone to great lengths and considerable expense to fix their problem pistols without success and where they have been given a consistent runaround by Glock. They have also been consistently abused by people like you who think there is no real problem because they have a G36 with no problem. This has continued even when they have made videos showing very well controlled muzzle flip with several jams per magazine.

If this were, as you suggest, just the ocasional problem in manufacture rather than a fundamental fault that shows itself randomly, then Glock would have produced a fix for it and I would not be writing about the G36 in this thread. I have already said in a post above that any manufacturer can produce a lemon from time to time, but this is not that. The fact that yet another purchaser of a G36 is having precisely the same problem with a new G36 shows that they have not fixed their production any more than they have produced fixes for older pistols.

If this was just an unfortunate manufacturing problem, Glock would have an established system to deal with it. They have no such thing and now they have no such thing for the ejection problems with some Gen4 and late Gen 3 pistols in at least 9mm and .40S&W. This time they are trying, but they are trying with remarkably little intelligence and no success.

Your silly idea about the reputation of Gen4 pistols in 2022 is not worth comment but let me ask you a simple related question. Glocks have been around for about 30 years and the internet has been around for a good part of that time. A major factor in their success has been their reputation for the highest level of reliability. That reputation was deserved and has been promulgated via the internet. Do you think that would have happened if their reliability had been what it is now? I think the answer to that is that the internet would have used that poor reliability to rubbish all plastic pistols. Glock would now be a small player like Charter Arms, or broke and S&W would still be making only all metal pistols. Do tell us your answer.

I find this extremely sad because my Glocks are close to my favourite pistols, but things are rarely improved by pretending that their problems do not exist. This is a mind set which has been endemic at Glock for a long time. They have a reputation for never admitting to mistakes. Once you put on that public persona for long enough it penetrates back through the organization and as well as never admitting fault to the public, engineers stop admitting fault to their managers and lower level managers stop admitting fault to their upper managers.

EnglishHere is the important thing to remember. When things work perfectly, people rarely post threads about it. When something goes wrong, people are very vocal about it and post about it to find a solution and/or people with similar issues. The internet has made it very easy to blow the smallest of issues way out of proportion. I guarantee that for every 1 person that has a problem G36 there are 1000 with pistols that operate flawlessly. With any mass produced product with multiple moving parts and specific tolerances, there will be the occasional problem pistol that slips through QC. Car manufacturers make lemons and ammo manufacturers have the occasion undercharged/overcharged round. This is inevitable and unavoidable in any industry where a product is produced in high quantities, not just with firearms.

That being said, how many people who have sent their G36 back to Glock 4 times just to be told there is nothing wrong have let others fire and examine it to see if the problem is consistent or just an incompatibility issue with that user and that specific model of pistol? I don't own a G36 nor do I have any vested interest in defending it. I am simply looking at things objectively rather than developing biased opinions based on someone else's internet posts regarding a subject that I don't have first hand experience with.

English
11-16-2012, 04:54
Here is the important thing to remember. When things work perfectly, people rarely post threads about it. When something goes wrong, people are very vocal about it and post about it to find a solution and/or people with similar issues. The internet has made it very easy to blow the smallest of issues way out of proportion. I guarantee that for every 1 person that has a problem G36 there are 1000 with pistols that operate flawlessly. With any mass produced product with multiple moving parts and specific tolerances, there will be the occasional problem pistol that slips through QC. Car manufacturers make lemons and ammo manufacturers have the occasion undercharged/overcharged round. This is inevitable and unavoidable in any industry where a product is produced in high quantities, not just with firearms.

That being said, how many people who have sent their G36 back to Glock 4 times just to be told there is nothing wrong have let others fire and examine it to see if the problem is consistent or just an incompatibility issue with that user and that specific model of pistol? I don't own a G36 nor do I have any vested interest in defending it. I am simply looking at things objectively rather than developing biased opinions based on someone else's internet posts regarding a subject that I don't have first hand experience with.

Thank you for your well reasoned post. It is, indeed, important to remember the selective reporting of the internet and I have done so at all times. It is also important to remember the emotional attachment that some people have to their choice of pistol. They can't bear to hear anything said against it and react accordingly. This is an especially strong trait in owners of 9mms and G36s.

Like you, I don't own a G36, and neither do I wish to, but I have no vested interest in attacking it. I was drawn into this debate what seems like about three years back when I made what seemed to me to be a perfectly rational post in a thread about G36 extraction problems. You would have thought I had said that I hate apple pie and the Moms who make it. I don't know the proportion of bad G36s out there, but I suspect it is well over the one in a thousand level. If it were so low it would be easy for Glock just to replace each one with a new one. Instead of that they have given the owners a long running run around and they have never, as far as I know, succeeded in rectifying one of them.

The USA is probably the only country in the world with a market for the G36 and I have no idea of the numbers sold, but someone at Glock made a policy decision that it wasn't worth while to try to fix the problem. That meant it wasn't worth trying to find out the source of the problem. Whether they, like so many here in GT wrote it off as limp wristing, I can't tell.

There is no doubt that Glocks are more prone to misfeeding when held in a ridiculously light grip than most other pistols simply because the frame is much lighter than most other pistols. Here, such a grip means holding the pistol almost at right angles to the normal direction with only the thumb, rather than the web of the hand, behind the back strap. You can probably find this on U Tube if you look but it is far more extreme than almost any possible limp wristing in a normal grip. This is as true of 9mm Glocks as of other 9mms. The G36 is going to be amongst the worst on such a test, but one of the G36 owners who fought it all the way with Glock actually produced a video of him shooting and the pistol repeatedly jamming. It was very clear that he was not limp wristing but the hysterical cries about limp wristing continued.

There seem to be a lot of people on Glock Talk but they are spread across the USA quite thinly and so it is hard to get happy G36 owners together with unhappy ones. I know because I tried to organize such a meeting of G36 shooters.

The other thing that is important to remember is that the people here shoot because they like shooting. The great majority who buy pistols do so for what they imagine to be self defence but have no wish to actually practice and gain any skill. These people buy on looks and something they have heard somewhere and end up with .357 snubbies and G36s. Two or three rounds is enough to convine them that they don't want to do that again and the gun remains in a drawer for the next 30 or 40 years without being shot again. They never find out whether it is reliable or not. On this basis, it is even harder to discover how many bad G36s there are out there.

English

MeanAction
11-16-2012, 05:04
Carry G36 everyday. Fired over thousand failure free rounds. I love it!

bobandmikako
11-16-2012, 05:56
I've had my G36 since 2007 and have no idea how many hundreds or thousands of rounds I have through it. I've changed the recoil spring once, but that was just because I thought it may be due. I've never had a single failure with it.

Roger1079
11-16-2012, 11:07
There is no doubt that Glocks are more prone to misfeeding when held in a ridiculously light grip than most other pistols simply because the frame is much lighter than most other pistols. Here, such a grip means holding the pistol almost at right angles to the normal direction with only the thumb, rather than the web of the hand, behind the back strap. You can probably find this on U Tube if you look but it is far more extreme than almost any possible limp wristing in a normal grip. This is as true of 9mm Glocks as of other 9mms. The G36 is going to be amongst the worst on such a test, but one of the G36 owners who fought it all the way with Glock actually produced a video of him shooting and the pistol repeatedly jamming. It was very clear that he was not limp wristing but the hysterical cries about limp wristing continued.
I actually own a Gen3 G19 manufactured in 2009 now because my girlfriend was just incompatible with the pistol she bought. She would either stovepipe or fail to feed every 4 rounds or so. Her grip was textbook and she was able to shoot my G26, G27, and G30 with no issues at all. I would take the pistol from her and after clearing the jam, could not for the life of me recreate the issue. I held the pistol more and more loose with every round and quit when I felt it would be unsafe to release my grip any further. We tried different ammo including +P defensive rounds as well as different magazines. The result with her and that G19 was always the same from round 1. Again, this pistol has been flawless for me and she was able to fire 3 other Glocks all with no issue.

I have no explanation for this nor does anyone else that has witnessed it including a Glock armorer at my local range. That pistol just wasn't made for her I guess.

LevoDopa
11-16-2012, 11:18
I got my 36 in summer 2004. The first 300 rounds I put through it were AE FMJ 230gr. If memory serves I had two FTEs, but that was my first handgun purchase so I think that's accurate.

My gun was bought used and still had factory lubricant all over it. Once I detail stripped it and did the $0.25 trigger job on it I had no problems after that. For some reason my guide rod had a spring improperly set on it. Once I fixed that with an entire new rod/springs it worked flawlessly.

I've read about the many problems people have, and have gone through everything from TulAmmo to top end SD ammo with zero problems.


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fastbolt
11-16-2012, 13:17
... was just incompatible with the pistol she bought. She would either stovepipe or fail to feed every 4 rounds or so. Her grip was textbook and she was able to shoot my G26, G27, and G30 with no issues at all. I would take the pistol from her and after clearing the jam, could not for the life of me recreate the issue.

... has been flawless for me and she was able to fire 3 other Glocks all with no issue.

... I have no explanation for this nor does anyone else that has witnessed it including a Glock armorer at my local range. That pistol just wasn't made for her I guess.

I tend to agree with your observations in your last couple of posts. I've had more than my fair share of opportunity to see similar occurrences over the years I've worked as an instructor & armorer. Some folks and certain pistols/calibers just don't seem to be optimal matches.

I remember when we were doing some extended T&E with an assortment of .40's & .45's several years ago. One of the selected female shooters had no problems shooting all of the submitted T&E .40's & .45's (and had no problems shooting her issued metal-framed 9mm of several year's use), with the sole exception of a G21.

She repeatedly experienced stoppages using the same G21 and the same ammunition that functioned just fine in the hands of everyone else (including other female shooters). It just didn't suit her, and she really tried. She seemed quite puzzled by it, as she had no problems with any of the other models being tested in both calibers.

I've seen it happen with personally-owned pistols brought through range sessions upon occasion, too.