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Restless28
11-10-2012, 05:00
I want to give Scotch a try today. What would be a good, moderately priced, choice to begin with?

Also, tell me about Jameson's

clancy
11-10-2012, 05:08
Good Scotch and moderately priced do not go hand in hand. That being said, you have a huge choce in what you may want to drink. As far as blended Scotch, I prefer any of the Johnnie Walker's, and as far as inexpensive Scotch, try Cutty Sark. Dewar's is probably the most popular blend sold, for the life of me I don't know why. I guess it is better than no Scotch at all, though.

If you decide to go for a single malt Scotch, Glenlivet is one of the more popular brands, with justification. Glenmorangie, Laphroig and Cardhu are also good, and won't drive you(quite) into bankruptcy.

Jameson's? I don't care for it. I prefer Bushmill's, especially Black Bush. Now that is an Irish whiskey!

Restless28
11-10-2012, 05:11
Right now, I'm drinking Knob Creek, so I like moderately priced good stuff.

filthy infidel
11-10-2012, 05:18
I am not a scotch drinker, but a very good friend of mine who is a native Scotsman prefers Balvenie. Their fifteen year goes for about $75 a bottle.

faawrenchbndr
11-10-2012, 05:21
Knob Creek is ok,.....Mcallan 18 is the shiznits! :drool:

oldgraywolf
11-10-2012, 05:21
I wouldn't recommend starting with Laphroaig. I love the stuff, but it's a strongly flavored whiskey and not for everyone. Glenlivet is decent enough to start out on. I'd recommend a few drops of water (literally, a few drops) and slow sipping to enjoy the taste. Swirl it around in your mouth to enjoy the flavors.

deputy tom
11-10-2012, 05:24
I want to give Scotch a try today. What would be a good, moderately priced, choice to begin with?

Also, tell me about Jameson's

Go get a jug of Clan MacGregor. Best damn cheap Scotch sold. Jameson tastes like cat urine. tom.:wavey:

frizz
11-10-2012, 05:33
I want to give Scotch a try today. What would be a good, moderately priced, choice to begin with?

Also, tell me about Jameson's

Scottish Inns are always filthy dumps. I have never been to one, but the ones I have seen from the road look like flop houses, and are in skeevy areas.

I have been to a few Jameson Inns, and they are not the Hilton, but they are clean and slightly upscale.

:supergrin: :supergrin: :supergrin:

GreenDrake
11-10-2012, 07:06
For a good highland, outside of super top shelf stuff, and more to the readily available stuff...I like Oban and Dalwhinnie. When I can find it, I much prefer Edradour. Don't bother with blends, only single malts will give you the key to the love of scotch.

TBO
11-10-2012, 07:14
Abalore 12

Sent from the toe of my jack boot using Tapatalk 2

GLWyandotte
11-10-2012, 07:34
Jameson isn't Scotch.

As above, Aberlour is excellent.
Want something with a real personality? Try Talisker, my favorite.

Restless28
11-10-2012, 07:36
Jameson isn't Scotch.

As above, Aberlour is excellent.
Want something with a real personality? Try Talisker, my favorite.

I know that. It just happens to be on the shelf between bourbon and scotch. I was curious.

Restless28
11-10-2012, 07:37
For a good highland, outside of super top shelf stuff, and more to the readily available stuff...I like Oban and Dalwhinnie. When I can find it, I much prefer Edradour. Don't bother with blends, only single malts will give you the key to the love of scotch.

What makes the single malt superior?

JerryVO
11-10-2012, 07:43
Try mcallan 10 fine oak. The fine oak line has much less bite than the regular macallan and 10 year will be much easier on the wallet than the 18 mentioned above.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I777 using Tapatalk 2

Left-Right
11-10-2012, 07:55
I break Scotch, talking single malts, down to two broad categories: sweet, or smoky. Different Scotches slide up and down that scale, depending on their region, and it's up to the individual to find one that fits their taste or mood. As a rule, most people start out on the sweet side as they find the smoky scotches are a bit much at that point in their discovery.

Some examples to try:
Sweet--Macallan 12
In the middle--Balvenie Doublewood
Smoky-- Lagavulin 16

Btw, I think single malts are the way to go as you can fine tune the flavors you like.

Jameson's is a blended Irish whisky...worth a try.

GreenDrake
11-10-2012, 07:58
What makes the single malt superior?

There are of course some very tasty blends but without going into the grain usage and distillation quality aspects of it, a simple way to think of it is like cooking, when something doesn't taste good, people add things to it to make it taste like what they want. Single malt is three parts only, blends are multiple scotches and added sugars in most cases. The depth and complexity is created, not naturally occurring, if that makes sense. I know there are some scotch experts in here that will happily chime in. I am just a fan of it. I spent an entire month touring the Highlands and Lowlands, tasting and learning about scotches a few years back. Funniest moment ever on that trip was sitting in the library of the bed and breakfast we stayed at in Pitlochry, chatting with the owner, Charlie. I asked the same question about the difference. Charlie looks at me and says "blends are crap".

While I can concur that some blends are great, the single malt experience is a journey, and one you will truly enjoy. Lowland, Islay and Speysides are another experience altogether. Never have it cold or with ice and always add a small splash of water to it as you enjoy a dram neat.

MtBaldy
11-10-2012, 08:31
I don't drink blends any more unless there is no other choice. For a blend Johnnie Walker Black is pretty good and not too expensive. The 12 yo Glenlivet is pretty much a generic single malt and probably a good place to start, also not too expensive. The 12 yo Balvenie Doublewood and Macallan are also nice but more money. My preference these days runs to the Laphroaig Quarter Cask, a great deal, and the fairly pricy Lagavulin 16 yo.

AZLawDawg
11-10-2012, 08:43
If you are new to Scotch, I'd shy away from anything with Islay on the label (even though it's my favorite region), it does tend to scare some new drinkers off.

MtBaldy
11-10-2012, 08:48
If you are new to Scotch, I'd shy away from anything with Islay on the label (even though it's my favorite region), it does tend to scare some new drinkers off.

My wife said the 10 yo Laphroaig had an aftertaste of dead fish. She's not much of a scotch drinker anyway but wanted to try it. By the end of that first bottle I was hooked.

AZLawDawg
11-10-2012, 08:54
My wife said the 10 yo Laphroaig had an aftertaste of dead fish. She's not much of a scotch drinker anyway but wanted to try it. By the end of that first bottle I was hooked.

My wife had, and still has the same reaction. If she smells it, she'll say, "what!?!? are you drinking Laphroaig?? ugh! I can smell it from all the way over here!".

The 10, as widely available as it is, is one of my all time favorites.

.264 magnum
11-10-2012, 09:06
I want to give Scotch a try today. What would be a good, moderately priced, choice to begin with?

Also, tell me about Jameson's


Regular Jameson's is the Coors regular of Irish Whiskies. Good but not special. If you want to start with an Irish look for Red Breast.


I think you have three options to get started.....

I'd, assuming they are legal for sale in your area, take $30/50 bucks and buy a number of 50ml variety-packs. Glenfiddich sells a 12, 15 and 18yr. pack that is a great start. It's not my style but Glenfiddich's 15 and 18 are really fine drams.
Balvenie makes a similar pack with up to 21yr old doublewood IIRC.

or- Go to a bar and try a drink or two of different makes, some bars are cool with pouring a series of short pours - maybe a flight. You might just find out that the big scary Islay and Mull whiskies are perfect from the start.
If you do the bar thing have the bar keep rinse your glass with water first. Sip every drink straight and then add water if you want, 1, 2, 3 or so drops not a big splash. No ice. Figure out what you like on the flavor merits - add ice to a personal bottle if you have too at home. Take notes. Take a lot of time. A short pour of scotch can/probably should be enjoyed for a long while.

or- If you prefer to start with a 750 and go low risk I'd look at Singleton's 12, Glenfarclas 10, Mac 10, Oban 10 etc. If you want to take a risk you could start with Ardbeg 10, Laphroaig 10 or Bowmore 10 (Bowmore at every age is usually a very good buy - but it's big). Every liquor store has a resident scotch dork - this guy needs to be your new best friend. He's likely tried all of the better scotches in the store, he knows what's great v. what's a great buy. He knows the various styles and can explain them well.

As Deputy Tom mentioned the "Clan MacGregor" (sp?) is a good lower end scotch.


Get ready to have some fun.


ETA - as MtBaldy noted Laphroaig Quarter Cask is usually a very good buy. See if you can wrangle a taste of LQC at a bar or tasting. It might save you years of screwing around.

vikingsoftpaw
11-10-2012, 09:07
I wouldn't recommend starting with Laphroaig. I love the stuff, but it's a strongly flavored whiskey and not for everyone. Glenlivet is decent enough to start out on. I'd recommend a few drops of water (literally, a few drops) and slow sipping to enjoy the taste. Swirl it around in your mouth to enjoy the flavors.

This ^^.

My first taste of Scotch was Laphroaig. It lead me to the false conclusion that all Scotch Whiskeys were like that, heavy and peaty.

Kind of like person having Wild Turkey as a first shot of Bourbon.

ColdSteelNail
11-10-2012, 09:09
Moderately priced Scotch is not the same as moderately priced bourbon or other whiskeys. In the Scotch world I would consider $60-$90 to be moderate. Having said that I guess I like the cheap stuff. I usually drink Glenfiddich 12YO at around $50. Of course the price can vary considerably from store to store.

.264 magnum
11-10-2012, 09:10
I don't drink blends any more unless there is no other choice. For a blend Johnnie Walker Black is pretty good and not too expensive. The 12 yo Glenlivet is pretty much a generic single malt and probably a good place to start, also not too expensive. The 12 yo Balvenie Doublewood and Macallan are also nice but more money. My preference these days runs to the Laphroaig Quarter Cask, a great deal, and the fairly pricy Lagavulin 16 yo.

It's funny how so many of us end up in the same place as it were.

.264 magnum
11-10-2012, 09:17
My wife had, and still has the same reaction. If she smells it, she'll say, "what!?!? are you drinking Laphroaig?? ugh! I can smell it from all the way over here!".

The 10, as widely available as it is, is one of my all time favorites.

I think women have better senses of smell than men. I had a couple drinks of Ardbeg 10 last night. My wife says the house still smells like "rotten antiseptic".

PPinesRon
11-10-2012, 09:47
I've got a question for the Scotch drinkers.

First, I don't drink Scotch, health reasons. I was given a bottle of Buchanan's 12 year Scotch about 15 years ago. Haven't open it. A neighbor of mine drinks Scotch and I was thinking of offering him some next time he comes over. Would I be ok in offering him this? I really don't know.

Thanks.

HexHead
11-10-2012, 10:26
I like Highland Park 12, which is peaty and very smooth, and Balvenie Doublewood 12 which I find exceptionally smooth. The Doublewood refers to it's finishing the fermentation process in sherry casks. I like both, but prefer the Balvenie.

boone10
11-10-2012, 11:00
Tagged till my next liquor run...

.264 magnum
11-10-2012, 12:58
I've got a question for the Scotch drinkers.

First, I don't drink Scotch, health reasons. I was given a bottle of Buchanan's 12 year Scotch about 15 years ago. Haven't open it. A neighbor of mine drinks Scotch and I was thinking of offering him some next time he comes over. Would I be ok in offering him this? I really don't know.

Thanks.

Should be 100% A-OK.

PPinesRon
11-10-2012, 14:57
Should be 100% A-OK.

Thanks.

Atomic Punk
11-10-2012, 15:40
good timing on this thread. my wife has a lot of Scottish heritage, and was wanting to try a real scottish whiskey.

IhRedrider
11-10-2012, 16:10
First, I don't drink Scotch, health reasons. I was given a bottle of Buchanan's 12 year Scotch about 15 years ago. Haven't open it. A neighbor of mine drinks Scotch and I was thinking of offering him some next time he comes over. Would I be ok in offering him this? I really don't know.

Thanks.


This is not a good idea, he might be offended. Just send it to me and I will dispose of it properly. :supergrin:

samuse
11-10-2012, 16:14
I'd recommend Glenlivet 12.

Not too expensive, easy on the palate.

I'm a single malt guy and Glenlivet 12 is my everyday drink.

Kinda the Glock 17 of the Scotch world.

bobtheelf
11-10-2012, 16:40
For scotch, The Glenlivet is pretty good IMO. A good trial run and not too expensive.

Sporaticus
11-10-2012, 16:50
I started out buying small bottles (~750ml) and seeing what I liked. I found that I like Dewars for the moderate price, not the white label Dewars. There are worse that are cheaper, and there are better that cost more, but I can enjoy Dewars. I also like JW Red Label. I think Dewars is a little cheaper, but I alternate between the two.

I have about a dozen different brands on the bar I have tried, but didn't finish. Not that they aren't any good, but for special occasions. I enjoyed trying them all, and I still like comparing regions and flavors.

You might find another brand you like, you'll just have to try them all.

Bushflyr
11-10-2012, 16:57
And another vote for starting off with Glenlivet. Good quality, not too pricey, and light on the peat. When I first tried Glenfiddich all I could think of was burning tires. Coming back to it years later it was MUCH more palatable.

Restless28
11-10-2012, 16:58
I chose JW Red because it was the smallest bottle available. I like the smoky flavor so far.

RWBlue
11-10-2012, 17:15
I think it all depends on what you like.

IMHO, Cheap and Scotch = Sucks.
Reasonably priced and Scotch can be done.

I like highland single malt scotch. I don't like much smoke flavor.

Bushflyr
11-10-2012, 17:50
I chose JW Red because it was the smallest bottle available. I like the smoky flavor so far.

JW red = turpentine. JW Black = flavorless turpentine. :supergrin:

jr05
11-10-2012, 18:01
macallan 18 is excellent.

For a smooth scotch to drink often, johnny walker black is quite good and cheap.

deadmanglocking
11-10-2012, 18:24
For a beginner scotch stick to a big name brand till you develop a taste for it. Go to the liquor store, airplane bottles are your friend. Try different brands till you find one you like. That way you aren't laying out a lot of $ on hit or miss. Me, I love Lagavulin.

Jonesee
11-10-2012, 18:24
I'd recommend Glenlivet 12.

Not too expensive, easy on the palate.

I'm a single malt guy and Glenlivet 12 is my everyday drink.

Kinda the Glock 17 of the Scotch world.


Great first scotch. Glenlivet 15 year French Cask is about $40 a bottle and absolutely perfect scotch for a first timer.

tango44
11-10-2012, 18:30
JW Double Black Label for me!

.264 magnum
11-10-2012, 18:42
And another vote for starting off with Glenlivet. Good quality, not too pricey, and light on the peat. When I first tried Glenfiddich all I could think of was burning tires. Coming back to it years later it was MUCH more palatable.

Ummm......both are fairly soft Speyside single malts.

unit1069
11-10-2012, 18:45
I want to give Scotch a try today. What would be a good, moderately priced, choice to begin with?

Also, tell me about Jameson's

I have to agree that Glenlivet is an excellent single malt Scotch. I've never had what I'd consider a bad bottle. If you want to go high dollar Edradour is a good choice.

Catholics drink Jameson and Protestants drink Bushmills, if that tells you anything. Personally, I'm not an Irish Whiskey fan.

GreenDrake
11-10-2012, 18:52
I have actually come to get back into whiskeys after the scotch run and pricing. Irish Whiskeys have my attention during the winter months. Lowland and speysides are super smokey, not for a beginner palate at all.

Bushflyr
11-10-2012, 19:01
Ummm......both are fairly soft Speyside single malts.

:dunno: Just sayin'. I'd never had any sort of scotch before. I think Glenfiddich was my first and that was my impression.

.264 magnum
11-10-2012, 19:06
:dunno: Just sayin'. I'd never had any sort of scotch before. I think Glenfiddich was my first and that was my impression.

Fair enough.

oldgraywolf
11-10-2012, 19:08
I chose JW Red because it was the smallest bottle available. I like the smoky flavor so far.

Once you start into single malts, you'll never go back to blends.

RWBlue
11-10-2012, 20:00
Once you start into single malts, you'll never go back to blends.

I did.








Budget just couldn't take my drinking habit.

MtBaldy
11-10-2012, 20:40
I like Highland Park 12, which is peaty and very smooth, and Balvenie Doublewood 12 which I find exceptionally smooth. The Doublewood refers to it's finishing the fermentation process in sherry casks. .

Ummm, no. Scotch is distilled not fermented. Granted fermentation is part of the process but after it's fermented it's distilled. The Doublewood refers to the AGING process. It starts out in oak barrels used to age bourbon and then is finished in barrels used to age sherry. The Balvenie Doublewood was one of my first single malt scotches and I still enjoy it occasionally.

Cooper
11-10-2012, 21:57
It's all relative on your experience as a whiskey drinker. Because you asked about Jameson in a thread about Scotch, we're assuming you are fairly inexperienced. But if you've had a lot of experience with bourbons, much of that will translate.

Don't get caught up in the minutiae. Deciding if you "like Scotch" is about like deciding if you like peanut butter. You can go buy a $3.00 jar of Peter Pan or a $7.00 jar of organic all natural super roasted whatever. What does it taste like? Peanut butter.

I'd recommend Glenlivet as a great starting point to decide if you like Scotch. One sip and you'll know if you DON'T like it. If you do like it, I'd recommend the McClelland brand for good, affordable variety. They have a Lowland, a Highland, a Speyside and an Islay, which are four major Scotch "regions." You could get all four for a hundred bucks. I've had the Islay and liked it a lot.

Then, if you decide to drop some real cash, you'll have a more targeted approach.

Just for the record, in my experience Dewars White Label = headache juice. Stick with Glenlivet to start, or at the very least Chivas.

AZLawDawg
11-10-2012, 22:55
Lowland and speysides are super smokey, not for a beginner palate at all.

What? Are you serious here?

ShakyDave
11-11-2012, 00:15
Last year I met the Balvenie international sales manager and he enlightened me. First, Glenfiddich is owned by the Grant family who also produce Balvenie and, on the blended end, Grant's.

Balvenie and Glenfiddich are the only two Scotches that are completely hand-crafted. The rest are turned out by computer. Doesn't mean hand-crafted is better, just kinda neat if you dig the artisan thing. Glenfiddich was the first single malt ever marketed, EVER, in 1963! I had assumed that there had always been single malt on the market but it just hadn't reached our shores, but he told me that their master distiller came up with the idea and shazam, it took off like a rocket. Glenlivit was next, owned by a French consortium.

The Grant family still owns their distilleries, some little island off the northeast coast, and every person in the little town of around 250 ppl works for the distillery. The Grants refused to computerize so they wouldn't have layoffs.

There are about 90 distilleries in Scotland but very few market single malts because the profit margin is in blends. They sell to Usher, Johnny Walker, Cutty Sark, etc.

There are two types of booze in Scotland: malt whisky and grain whisky. Single malt is just what it sounds like, blended whiskies can be a blend of 100 percent malt whiskes - only a handful - or of malt whisky and grain whisky, being the vast majority. Something like 100 Pipers is about 70 percent grain. The good blends like Dewars or Johnnie Walker Black, Green, or Blue, are all malts.

If you start Scotch, as previously mentioned, I'd recommend Macallan 12. It's light, has a sweet nose, and pretty cheap. I've had all the Macallans short of their 25 year old and the 12 is my favorite.

I started Scotch half a century ago as a teenager and before I got my hands on single malt I guzzled J & B. Haig Pinch is good, too. The great thing about Scotch is that every last label is distinctly different. Mostly now I drink Laphroag because of sentimental reasons or when I can't find a bottle of iodine to chug. Seriously, pour a glass and you can smell it across the room, but if you already drink bourbon you can handle it. That's the sort of apex whisky for the Scotch hound.

ShakyDave
11-11-2012, 00:22
If you're already drinking bourbon, you won't get freaked out on Laphroag. Just be aware it's got quite a nose.

A tip on drinking it - if you take it straight just sip barely a drop, just enough to coat your tongue, and hold it against the roof of your mouth to let it fill your sinuses. If you add water, just a little but to open up the aroma. Use ice if you want but be aware that the ice chills the liquor and you won't get either aroma or flavor, just alcohol taste.

Slante!

Restless28
11-11-2012, 06:29
Thanks for the advice! I had no idea that scotch was so interesting.

Even though I chickened out and bought the JW Red, I found myself drinking it much slower than bourbon. It's a different experience, and I love the peat flavor.

Our state liquor store only has the larger bottles of scotch. The only miniature was Dewars, so I have to buy the big bottle to try. The JW Red was the only pint bottle in the store.

Restless28
11-12-2012, 05:08
Last night I finished off the last of the JW Red. I like it better than bourbon, as its easier to drink neat.

I am left wanting more, and I want to try a single malt. I love the smoky flavor, so a strong peat scotch won't offend me.

MtBaldy
11-12-2012, 05:42
Last night I finished off the last of the JW Red. I like it better than bourbon, as its easier to drink neat.

I am left wanting more, and I want to try a single malt. I love the smoky flavor, so a strong peat scotch won't offend me.

Glad you liked it. I would NOT have recommended the JW Red as your first scotch. As others have said a 12 yo Glenlivet would be a good single malt scotch to start with. If you think you like peaty then maybe try a bottle of Laphroaig Quarter Cask.

eruby
11-12-2012, 06:24
For a good highland, outside of super top shelf stuff, and more to the readily available stuff...I like Oban and Dalwhinnie. When I can find it, I much prefer Edradour. Don't bother with blends, only single malts will give you the key to the love of scotch.

What makes the single malt superior?Some years ago I went to an event hosted by Johnny Walker and the rep told the story of a woman at one of his events that kept insisting single malts were far superior to blends and that blends weren't worth it.

He tried to use the example that a single malt is like a violin solo, and a blend was like an orchestra. Both had their pluses.

She wasn't buying it and kept harping on the single malts. Finally, he told us, he just capitulated and told the woman, "you're right, single malts are the only way to go" just so he could move on.

This event was the first time I'd heard the term 'angel's share'.

Bushflyr
11-12-2012, 08:46
I love the smoky flavor, so a strong peat scotch won't offend me.

Be careful what you ask for grasshopper. Some of the Islay's have so much smoke and iodine you'll swear they belong in the medicine cabinet instead of the liquor cabinet.

GreenDrake
11-12-2012, 08:56
They do, huge. Sometimes it's just what the doctor ordered though.

Restless28
11-12-2012, 11:54
Lucked out today! The resident scotch guru was in the store when I stopped in. He suggested pretty much what all of you have. He did think that I should try a blended and a 100ml 4 pack of single malt Glenmorangie to get a feel for the drink.

The Glenmorangie set has The Original, The Lasanta (his favorite), The Quinta Ruban, and The Nectar d'Or.

I went with a JW Black for the blend.

MtBaldy
11-12-2012, 12:03
I went with a JW Black for the blend.

Good choice. These guys are scotch snobs and they like it:

http://www.whiskymag.com/whisky/brand/johnnie_walker/whisky4452.html

mike from st pe
11-12-2012, 19:28
Tomatin 12 year old. A single malt, mild flavor, a perfect first whisky.

.264 magnum
11-12-2012, 19:29
Lucked out today! The resident scotch guru was in the store when I stopped in. He suggested pretty much what all of you have. He did think that I should try a blended and a 100ml 4 pack of single malt Glenmorangie to get a feel for the drink.

The Glenmorangie set has The Original, The Lasanta (his favorite), The Quinta Ruban, and The Nectar d'Or.

I went with a JW Black for the blend.

Next time you see him ask his opinion on Springbank 10.

Johnspark
11-12-2012, 19:38
Lucked out today! The resident scotch guru was in the store when I stopped in. He suggested pretty much what all of you have. He did think that I should try a blended and a 100ml 4 pack of single malt Glenmorangie to get a feel for the drink.

The Glenmorangie set has The Original, The Lasanta (his favorite), The Quinta Ruban, and The Nectar d'Or.

I went with a JW Black for the blend.

I've been buying that gift set for a long time now. It's great stuff. The nectar de'Or is unbelievable!

I don't like the peaty stuff as much...Glenmo won't treat you wrong.

Restless28
11-12-2012, 20:12
Next time you see him ask his opinion on Springbank 10.

Roger that.

Restless28
11-12-2012, 20:14
I've been buying that gift set for a long time now. It's great stuff. The nectar de'Or is unbelievable!

I don't like the peaty stuff as much...Glenmo won't treat you wrong.

Yeah, I'm saving that for Thanksgiving. Tonight I began with 50-50 JW Black and 7up, them 75-25 JW, and finally 100 JW. I'm getting more comfortable with the idea of neat.

eyesnorth
11-16-2012, 21:37
Ok, I'm looking for suggestions here...

I recently tried JW Double Black and enjoyed the smokey flavor. I see another bottle in my near future.

This weekend I tried some Macallan 12; ok, but it had a... I don't know, maybe a minty after taste. Not bad, but not worth the ok flavor for the dollars.

Suggestions....?

Timjo1955
11-16-2012, 22:56
I went with a JW Black for the blend.[/QUOTE]

I like JW Black(Winston Churchill's favorite BTW), but I really prefer the JW Green, less smoky but smoother.
If you advance to the peaty Islays, I second recommendations of Laphroaig QC and Lagavulin 16. :wavey:

Restless28
11-17-2012, 04:22
I went with a JW Black for the blend.

I like JW Black(Winston Churchill's favorite BTW), but I really prefer the JW Green, less smoky but smoother.
If you advance to the peaty Islays, I second recommendations of Laphroaig QC and Lagavulin 16. :wavey:[/QUOTE]

Thanks. I was disappointed with Glenmorangie Original. Flavorless IMO. I actually like the JW Red as much as the Black now.

tdreis45
11-17-2012, 06:37
Glenmorangie Original would fit the bill nicely. It's a wonderful, light single malt scotch and is $28 in my area. Some of my favorites are...

Glenmorangie
The Balvenie
The Macallan

Aberlour A'bunadh is also a great whisky and is non chill fitered and cask strength. YUM

Restless28
11-19-2012, 18:32
Picked up some Laphroaig for Thanksgiving, along with more JW Black.

A local businessman was in the store too. He likes the Laphroaig too. He told me what y'all have about it being full of character. When I told him that I was hesitant to try it, he told me that he would take it off my hands, LOL.

PettyOfficer
11-19-2012, 18:48
Laphroaig is he most peaty of all scotches, which I just am not fond of.

MacCallans is always a decent standby (18 yr or older).

The Balvanie is one of my favorites, try the Portwood or Doublewood. They age the scotch in different types of bourbon or wine casks adding very unique flavors.

FPS
11-19-2012, 19:16
So much whisky, so little time.

I enjoy them all: from Oban to Macallan to Lagavulin. The blended Johnnie Black Label, Gold Label or Green Label to the creamy smooth Chivas 18yo.

It all depends on the mood and the food and smoke that dictates which booze I enjoy. Let it compliment your night of good times and good friends. If no friends are around, curl up with the dog by the fire. :cool:

.

Restless28
11-19-2012, 19:25
Indeed, FPS.

I now prefer scotch over bourbon. I'm a peat fan now.

b_oglethorpe
11-19-2012, 19:26
Ewww that stuff is gross.


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Bren
11-19-2012, 19:32
I want to give Scotch a try today. What would be a good, moderately priced, choice to begin with?

Also, tell me about Jameson's

Scotch - can't you just buy bourbon and water it down until the flavor is gone? Probably cheaper.

There is actually some truth to that. Bourbon makers only use new charred white oak barrels (actually a legal requirement of putting "bourbon" on the label) and about 70% of the bourbon flavor comes from the wood - once it is used, the flavor is gone and the barrel can't be used to make more bourbon...so they sell the barrels to scotch makers (and some other distillers) and ship them off to Scotland for reuse with most of the flavor removed.

oldgraywolf
11-19-2012, 19:42
Scotch - can't you just buy bourbon and water it down until the flavor is gone?

Never tried 10 y.o. Laphroaig, right? Rye is better than bourbon, too.

CBennett
11-19-2012, 21:04
Balvenie doublewood here, Glenmorangie is also good as is Glenlivet and Glenfiddich. for starters stay away from real peaty stuff IMO its a acquired taste...I still dont like them :)

AZLawDawg
11-19-2012, 21:13
Scotch - can't you just buy bourbon and water it down until the flavor is gone? Probably cheaper.

There is actually some truth to that. Bourbon makes only use new charred white oak barrels (actually a legal requirement of putting "bourbon" on the label) and about 70% of the bourbon flavor comes from the wood - once it is used, the flavor is gone and the barrel can't be used to make more bourbon...so they sell the barrels to scotch makers (and some other distillers) and ship them off to Scotland for reuse with most of the flavor removed.

When I hear "can't you just buy bourbon and water it down until the flavor is gone?", it makes me think that you have not tasted a lot of Scotch. I know this all boils down to personal opinions, but here, I respectfully disagree. I adore Bourbon as well, we can chat about that too.

leVieux
11-19-2012, 21:26
I quit drinking Scotch when the Scots & Brits released the Lock Erbie bomber, to go free, a slimy terrorist who murdered almost 300 innocent souls.

I now drink Irish Whisky and enjoy it all, especially "Tullamore Dew" !

leVieux

AZLawDawg
11-19-2012, 22:10
I quit drinking Scotch when the Scots & Brits released the Lock Erbie bomber, to go free, a slimy terrorist who murdered almost 300 innocent souls.

I now drink Irish Whisky and enjoy it all, especially "Tullamore Dew" !

leVieux

If you're gonna boycott something, at least get the name of the town right.
My thing is (and I had a discussion with friends on this a little while back) why boycott the distillers? I don't think The Deanston, or Caol Ila or Glenmorangie etc.. etc... had anything to do with that idiot's release. Think about it for a second. Your anger should be directed elsewhere.

Irish Whiskey-wise, I'll always go Connemara. always.

RWBlue
11-19-2012, 22:30
I quit drinking Scotch when the Scots & Brits released the Lock Erbie bomber, to go free, a slimy terrorist who murdered almost 300 innocent souls.

I now drink Irish Whisky and enjoy it all, especially "Tullamore Dew" !

leVieux

Sure support a different terrorist organization.
The IRA which killed approximately 1,800 people.

http://www.nato.int/docu/review/2012/threads-within/homegrown-terrorism-photostory/files/2270.jpg

Bren
11-20-2012, 04:10
Sure support a different terrorist organization.
The IRA which killed approximately 1,800 people.


I have nothing against the IRA. If the Canadians took over the US, how long would they have to stay before we were supposed to just forget about it and let them be? Their cause seems just, to me, and their tactics are appropriate to their size and ability.

eruby
11-20-2012, 04:50
My brother-in-law likes scotch. I tried to find out what he usually has, but his wife had no clue. I'm going with a blend and a single malt

I'm giving him a bottle of Chivas Regal 18yo old and a bottle of Glenfiddich 18yo for Christmas.

Hope he likes them.

Restless28
11-20-2012, 04:54
My brother-in-law likes scotch. I tried to find out what he usually has, but his wife had no clue. I'm going with a blend and a single malt

I'm giving him a bottle of Chivas Regal 18yo old and a bottle of Glenfiddich 18yo for Christmas.

Hope he likes them.

You're a good BIL!

RWBlue
11-20-2012, 09:03
I have nothing against the IRA. If the Canadians took over the US, how long would they have to stay before we were supposed to just forget about it and let them be? Their cause seems just, to me, and their tactics are appropriate to their size and ability.

I think if you do some more research I think you would change your mind.

In modern times, the original goal was good and Britain gave in pretty quickly. What it became was not about the original goal.

Green_Manelishi
12-11-2012, 16:41
There are very mild Islay whiskys.

There are peaty Highland expressions.

There are very good blends.

Even a single malt, unless it is a single cask, has been "blended" at the distillery to produce a product of consistency. The difference is that it's one distillery and no grain alcohol, only malt.

Restless28
12-11-2012, 18:18
There are very mild Islay whiskys.

There are peaty Highland expressions.

There are very good blends.

Even a single malt, unless it is a single cask, has been "blended" at the distillery to produce a product of consistency. The difference is that it's one distillery and no grain alcohol, only malt.

Got any suggestions for peaty highlands? I would like to try them. Also, a friend of mine picked me up a bottle of Old Forester Birthday Bourbon. He talked me into it. He says its awesome.

Frankly, I'm not sure anything is more awesome than Laphroaig 10 or Ardberg 10. I love Islay.

.264 magnum
12-11-2012, 21:52
Got any suggestions for peaty highlands? I would like to try them. Also, a friend of mine picked me up a bottle of Old Forester Birthday Bourbon. He talked me into it. He says its awesome.

Frankly, I'm not sure anything is more awesome than Laphroaig 10 or Ardberg 10. I love Islay.

Precisely speaking it's an Island Whisky but give Highland Park a try. HP uses peat and heather in the malting process on sight.

Green_Manelishi
12-12-2012, 12:17
Got any suggestions for peaty highlands? I would like to try them. Also, a friend of mine picked me up a bottle of Old Forester Birthday Bourbon. He talked me into it. He says its awesome.

Frankly, I'm not sure anything is more awesome than Laphroaig 10 or Ardberg 10. I love Islay.

Ardmore; 't is owned by Beam Global, which also owns Laphroaig.

Ledaig is not Islay, or Highland, but it's peaty.

Talisker has peat.

Edradour Ballechin is supposed to be peaty; I have never tried it because it's not been available to me.

If you REALLY want peat seek out Bruichladdich's Octomore, or Ardbeg's Supernova.