Best way to heat a doghouse? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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HollowHead
11-10-2012, 23:10
I recently cut a small opening in the side of my garage (12"W X16"H) and built an enclosed 5'X5'X3'H box in the corner where this door is. The floor is concrete slab and has approx. 6" of pine shavings as bedding and the box is single wall 5/16" OSB walls and ceiling. My wife is using the roof of the box to spread horse blankets all over so that I'm sure adds r-value. I'm not worried about the GSD but the Redbone hound is thin skinned, short haired and getting old. Any suggestions as to keep it tolerable in there for the old guy when it's negative double digits while we're at work? If it matters at all, the door and box are facing north-west. HH

jame
11-10-2012, 23:43
Yep I just bought one today.

I picked up a pet heating pad at Theisens, a local farm/country store. About $50, and I'm sure my garage dog will appreciate it.

HollowHead
11-10-2012, 23:55
Yep I just bought one today.

I picked up a pet heating pad at Theisens, a local farm/country store. About $50, and I'm sure my garage dog will appreciate it.

My concern is that when the Redbone gets bored, he chews and I don't want him chewing through 120 VAC. I lost a Beagle that way decades ago when I was a little kid. I'm looking for some kind of IR transducer or externally mounted ceramic blower, maybe? HH

AlexHassin
11-11-2012, 00:18
what your significant other is pissed at you too?

HollowHead
11-11-2012, 00:20
what your significant other is pissed at you too?

There's a reason I made this thing 75 cubic feet... HH

JimBianchi
11-11-2012, 00:23
Give a dog a fire and he is warm for a day.

Set a dog on fire and he will be warm the rest of his life.














I got nothing,,,,,,,,,,

9jeeps
11-11-2012, 00:24
If your dog is like family, perhaps you could let it in the house, I would and have if it were my dog and gave me it's lifetime of love.

HollowHead
11-11-2012, 00:27
If your dog is like family, perhaps you could let it in the house, I would and have if it were my dog and gave me it's lifetime of love.

A full working day with the both of us gone would leave them in shy of 12 hours. I don't think the Hoover Dam would hold that back... Come on, they're in all night and every second we're home but I need to think about ol' thin-skin while were working. HH

Sgt127
11-11-2012, 00:37
Mounted up high, with no exposed wires, a 100 watt (outdoor) spotlight will put out a tremendous amount of heat in an enclosed space. I used that in an old Igloo dog house for my outside dogs. A big pile of hay on the floor and it was downright toasty in there.

HollowHead
11-11-2012, 00:47
Mounted up high, with no exposed wires, a 100 watt (outdoor) spotlight will put out a tremendous amount of heat in an enclosed space. I used that in an old Igloo dog house for my outside dogs. A big pile of hay on the floor and it was downright toasty in there.

I was thinking about a high-hat but what about using an IR foodservice heatlamp instead since our ambients get in the neg. teens during the day. Would an IR heatlamp cause any UV damage like mucus membrane sunburn? HH

JW1178
11-11-2012, 01:10
Give a dog a fire and he is warm for a day.

Set a dog on fire and he will be warm the rest of his life.



I got nothing,,,,,,,,,,

:rofl:

I've got something....

Build a man a fire, he stays warm for a night. -socialist

Teach a man to build a fire, he stays warm for many nights. - capitalist

Set a man on fire, he stays warm for the rest of his life. - Fascist


:tongueout:

paynter2
11-11-2012, 04:31
My concern is that when the Redbone gets bored, he chews and I don't want him chewing through 120 VAC. I lost a Beagle that way decades ago when I was a little kid. I'm looking for some kind of IR transducer or externally mounted ceramic blower, maybe? HH

Put the heating pad under some plywood? Would the HP give off enough heat to warm the plywood sufficiently?

alphacat
11-11-2012, 04:37
A single 100w light bulb gives off lots of heat. Think about it.

southernshooter
11-11-2012, 04:39
My big ol lab would be insulted if he had to go outside for more time than it takes to do his business. He follows me around the house so close that if I stop he runs into the back of my legs.

rick458
11-11-2012, 04:44
Use a light bulb (red)in a caged housing, and secure the power cord.

eracer
11-11-2012, 04:55
http://arrowheadequipment.webs.com/flamethrower3.jpg

paynter2
11-11-2012, 05:05
http://arrowheadequipment.webs.com/flamethrower3.jpg

Ah.... Roast hot dogs! :whistling:

glockboy38
11-11-2012, 05:16
I used Oil-Filled Radiator heater, bolt it tight in the dog house.

aspartz
11-11-2012, 05:16
Piss of the tree huggers. Burn Coal

ARS

Hawker Man
11-11-2012, 06:21
Make a box that the dog house will set on. The box should be made from plywood and the top of the box will be the floor of the dog house. The box needs to be about 8 to 12 inches tall. Install two closet light fixtures with 60 watt bulbs in the box, they will gently heat the top of the box, floor of the house. When the dogs are not in the house you will not feel much heat at all but when they lay down in the house they will feel plenty of heat through the floor. No exposed wires, no light in the dog house, no burned dog, no fire hazard if wired properly, can easily be switch controlled. You can change bulb wattage to vary heat level.

Lowjiber
11-11-2012, 07:10
A single 100w light bulb gives off lots of heat. Think about it.
Thirty-five years ago (northern Ohio), I build a doghouse for my Britney.

I raised the floor about 6" and insulated between it and the ground...complete with moisture barrier plastic.

The "house" was five-by-five feet with R-19 in the walls.

The insulated "roof" was a pretty steeply angled A-Frame shape. I hinged one side so I could perform clean-ups, etc. I installed a 100w light bulb on the unhinged side which worked very well. (I put roofing shingles on as well.)

The "door" faced south and was just large enough for the dog to enter/exit through a "flap" of carpeting.

Filled with straw, the house was big enough to put her food bowl on one side and the water bowl on the other.

There were plenty of very cold days when I'd walk out to check on her and she'd just stick her nose out of the warm digs. (Unless, of course, I had my shotgun with me and she knew it was hunting time.)

I realize this description is not very technical, but it does work. Insulation and dry conditions are the keys.

engineer151515
11-11-2012, 07:29
Thirty-five years ago (northern Ohio), I build a doghouse for my Britney.

I raised the floor about 6" and insulated between it and the ground...complete with moisture barrier plastic.

The "house" was five-by-five feet with R-19 in the walls.

The insulated "roof" was a pretty steeply angled A-Frame shape. I hinged one side so I could perform clean-ups, etc. I installed a 100w light bulb on the unhinged side which worked very well. (I put roofing shingles on as well.)

The "door" faced south and was just large enough for the dog to enter/exit through a "flap" of carpeting.

Filled with straw, the house was big enough to put her food bowl on one side and the water bowl on the other.

There were plenty of very cold days when I'd walk out to check on her and she'd just stick her nose out of the warm digs. (Unless, of course, I had my shotgun with me and she knew it was hunting time.)

I realize this description is not very technical, but it does work. Insulation and dry conditions are the keys.

Good design.

Getting off the ground with the insulation and keeping the air still goes a long way for a furry animal to keep warm.

I also know others who use the 100W light bulb with success. One buddy even put it on a timer so it would turn off in the daytime.

El_Ron1
11-11-2012, 08:12
Fill that doghouse with some hotdogs!



http://www.cute-dachshund-pictures.com/images/Three-dachshunds-longhaired-chris-nichols.jpg

jtull7
11-11-2012, 10:04
I have always used hay. Cheap and effective.

certifiedfunds
11-11-2012, 10:31
Fill that doghouse with some hotdogs!



http://www.cute-dachshund-pictures.com/images/Three-dachshunds-longhaired-chris-nichols.jpg

They look ready to kick some dobie ass

kirgi08
11-11-2012, 10:43
Build ta suit yer climate.'08.

RonS
11-11-2012, 11:40
Put it on a platform, put the heat under the floor, run the cord where they can't get to it or run conduit. You can't chew what you can't reach. Alternative would be a heat lamp shining on the doghouse and surrounding floor from above.

I used to have a 110v 1500w panel heater, it never got hot enough to burn, you could easily build a false wall with a gap top and bottom, mount it behind it and let the air circulate the heat through the dog house. Again, protect the cord and you should be good.

UtahIrishman
11-11-2012, 11:50
Keep it simple...I built a little house for an outdoor cat we had that was getting old. Put some carpeting down and a 50 watt bulb in. It was downright toasty.

I wouldn't use an Infrared bulb. You could get more toast than you are bargaining for.

.264 magnum
11-11-2012, 12:00
By way of contextual warning. Remember the thread from years ago in which a guy's girlfriend turned on some type of blowdryer type heater to keep a couple of puppies warm inside a tent and promptly killed both pups?

I'd think a false floor with multiple explosion proof fixtures would fit the bill. Multiple fixtures so that Fido won't expire when one bulb goes out and you could tinker with different wattages in order to customize heat generation to the time of year etc. As a lighting device incandescent bulbs are wonderful heaters. IIRC incandescent bulbs per electrical input are about 1/3 of 1% effective at generating light - the rest is heat.

frizz
11-11-2012, 12:06
I used Oil-Filled Radiator heater, bolt it tight in the dog house.

Not in an enclosed space.

frizz
11-11-2012, 12:08
I recently cut a small opening in the side of my garage (12"W X16"H) and built an enclosed 5'X5'X3'H box in the corner where this door is. The floor is concrete slab and has approx. 6" of pine shavings as bedding and the box is single wall 5/16" OSB walls and ceiling. My wife is using the roof of the box to spread horse blankets all over so that I'm sure adds r-value. I'm not worried about the GSD but the Redbone hound is thin skinned, short haired and getting old. Any suggestions as to keep it tolerable in there for the old guy when it's negative double digits while we're at work? If it matters at all, the door and box are facing north-west. HH

An important factor is the volume of the enclosed space. Just as a room, the smaller it is, the less heat required to keep it warm. Those dimensions look too big, even for two large dogs.

If they will curl up together, an insulated doghouse that is just large enough for them to comfortably fit will do a good job. On days when it isn't bitterly cold, the body heat is enough to keep them warm.

When you say below 0, do you mean F or C?

BEER
11-11-2012, 12:18
cover the floor in hay, lay a few old blankets over the hay, then run a some sort of light (between 60w-100w) into the top.

Dan_ntx
11-11-2012, 12:35
Heating pad on the floor, piece of hardy board on top of the heating pad, blankets or dog beds on top of that.

Hardy board is waterproof, not popular to chew, and conducts heat well.

BC Dan
11-11-2012, 23:50
Not in an enclosed space.

Why not? Oil filled electric radiant heaters circulate oil, not burn it. There are no emissions.

douggmc
11-12-2012, 20:05
How about mounting somethign like this convection type heater: Amazon.com: Lifesmart Low Energy 11' x11' Foot Room Wall Panel Heater: Home & Kitchen@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/21bpLxPN5iL.@@AMEPARAM@@21bpLxPN5iL

Could plug it into an outlet type thermostat type device like this: Amazon.com: Lux WIN100 Heating & Cooling Programmable Outlet Thermostat: Home Improvement@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31w88shCk0L.@@AMEPARAM@@31w88shCk0L ... so it doesn't get too hot.

There are all types of similar types on Amazon.

DaneA
11-12-2012, 20:10
Don't over think this. I used to keep 8-10 Redbones warm in the winter with straw filled dog houses. The key is not to make the house too big and loosely fill it with straw. Even in sub zero temps my dogs stayed warm. They all had their own houses. After I would fill the house the dog would climb in and burrow out his/her bed and stay plenty warm.

douggmc
11-12-2012, 20:14
Don't over think this. I used to keep 8-10 Redbones warm in the winter with straw filled dog houses. The key is not to make the house too big and loosely fill it with straw. Even in sub zero temps my dogs stayed warm. They all had their own houses. After I would fill the house the dog would climb in and burrow out his/her bed and stay plenty warm.

I would agree, but he did say negative double digits. That is COLD and short of Malamutes or Husky type dogs, they are gonna struggle.

We kept a couple beagles in Ohio outside in well constructed houses with plenty of straw too. No problem. But we brought them in when it got down into and below the teens.

The other variable is ... dogs that are permanent "outside dogs" are better accustomed/acclimated to the cold. A dog that spends a lot of time indoors is going to be miserable outside 12 hours in that type of temperature.

HollowHead
11-12-2012, 20:43
An important factor is the volume of the enclosed space. Just as a room, the smaller it is, the less heat required to keep it warm. Those dimensions look too big, even for two large dogs.

If they will curl up together, an insulated doghouse that is just large enough for them to comfortably fit will do a good job. On days when it isn't bitterly cold, the body heat is enough to keep them warm.

When you say below 0, do you mean F or C?

I made it 5' x 5' because the dogs don't really like eachother. That, and it's often below zero F during the day when we're gone. For what it's worth, I'm looking into the heat strips that are put in the mastic of tiled bathroom floors on a timer. HH

*ASH*
11-12-2012, 20:47
in the house

Lone Wolf8634
11-12-2012, 21:06
I gotta go with light bulbs. A couple of fixtures in cages and some kind of a flap over the door to keep the heat in should keep them warm. Your not trying to heat it to 70 degrees, just heat it enough for them to be comfortable.