Give 2 weeks notice or not? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Kevinr20
11-11-2012, 11:54
I have a new job I'm starting at the end of the month and I'm trying to decide if I am going to give my employer a notice before I leave. I'm afraid if I put in my 2 weeks, they will just let me go and I will have 2 weeks of unpaid time off before I can start my new job and I can't afford that.

I know most of you will say "It's the right thing to do, it's professional courtesy, you might need them as a reference later" which I would normally agree with. My company is run by a bunch of shady, vindictive managers that have fired people as soon as they have put in their notice. Let's just say the way they treat employees is the main reason I'm leaving.

btw I've been at this company for 5 years...what would you do in this situation?

Bruce M
11-11-2012, 11:58
Maybe split the difference and give them one week? Maybe explain the situation to your new job and see if the current job lets you go immediately would the new job let you start early?

Buki192327
11-11-2012, 12:04
Do you have any unpaid vacation time coming? This could possibly carry you thru the 2 weeks, if they tell to to clear out now, if you give them notice.

If they let you go when you give them notice, you might be able to start earlier with your new company.

Kevinr20
11-11-2012, 12:05
Maybe split the difference and give them one week? Maybe explain the situation to your new job and see if the current job lets you go immediately would the new job let you start early?

The new job's training class begins on a certain date so I can't start early. Giving one week has been an alternate option but I'm not sure that's any better than no notice.

janice6
11-11-2012, 12:06
Typical notice is one pay period.

Kevinr20
11-11-2012, 12:07
Do you have any unpaid vacation time coming? This could possibly carry you thru the 2 weeks, if they tell to to clear out now, if you give them notice.

If they let you go when you give them notice, you might be able to start earlier with your new company.

I used all of my paid time off because I know they would simply take it and not pay it out.

TK-421
11-11-2012, 12:08
If your managers are vindictive *******s who fire people as soon as they put in their notice, then they don't need the courtesy of two weeks notice. Two weeks notice is supposed to give them time to find a replacement for your position. Obviously they don't need time to find a replacement, so you shouldn't give them time. Just wait until your last day before the class starts and tell them you quit.

NorthCarolinaLiberty
11-11-2012, 12:14
. My company is run by a bunch of shady, vindictive managers that have fired people as soon as they have put in their notice.

?

Sounds like you answered your own question.

AKRover
11-11-2012, 12:20
If you put in your 2 week notice they have to pay you for the hours you would work whether you work or not. If they decide to let you go right away after you put in your notice they are required by law to pay you.

Unless there is a blatant violation of company policy most employers try to avoid firing someone after they give notice. Often the person will be removed from anything sensitive and someone will be assigned to babysit them until they leave.

Most states are considered at will employment meaning the employer or employee can terminate employment with no notice. However, if you leave with no notice most companies consider you not able to be rehired which tends to raise flags with future employers.

oldgraywolf
11-11-2012, 12:20
If your managers are vindictive *******s who fire people as soon as they put in their notice, then they don't need the courtesy of two weeks notice. Two weeks notice is supposed to give them time to find a replacement for your position. Obviously they don't need time to find a replacement, so you shouldn't give them time. Just wait until your last day before the class starts and tell them you quit.

I would typically say to take the high road and give notice, but I have to agree with TK on this one.

Cali-Glock
11-11-2012, 12:23
I have given a month notice every time I have left a job. And every time after I left, I maintained a good relationship with my former employer and assisted in training my replacements and continue as a resource for my former employer.

I also bank and keep banked as much vacation as possible.

Kevinr20
11-11-2012, 12:23
If you put in your 2 week notice they have to pay you for the hours you would work whether you work or not. If they decide to let you go right away after you put in your notice they are required by law to pay you.

Unless there is a blatant violation of company policy most employers try to avoid firing someone after they give notice. Often the person will be removed from anything sensitive and someone will be assigned to babysit them until they leave.

Most states are considered at will employment meaning the employer or employee can terminate employment with no notice. However, if you leave with no notice most companies consider you not able to be rehired which tends to raise flags with future employers.

Any source on this? I'm pretty sure they don't have to pay me for my 2 weeks if they decide to fire me.

Cali-Glock
11-11-2012, 12:32
If you put in your 2 week notice they have to pay you for the hours you would work whether you work or not. If they decide to let you go right away after you put in your notice they are required by law to pay you.

So you claim Alaska has this stupid law? There is certainly no such Federal law and I have never heard of any such law in any state.

I agree that when a person gives notice and the employer wants to avoid issues that can arrise, it is a common and noble practice to pay a person for the "notice" time they gave, but a law?!

Hef
11-11-2012, 12:33
Show the same courtesy you've been shown, whatever that may be.

michael e
11-11-2012, 12:36
Think it depends on where you work.
Personally at my job I would not give two week notice, I have several reasons for not, but the main thing is I am commision only and they seem to give you the crap jobs once you tell them you are leaving.

tantrix
11-11-2012, 12:37
If your managers are vindictive *******s who fire people as soon as they put in their notice, then they don't need the courtesy of two weeks notice. Two weeks notice is supposed to give them time to find a replacement for your position. Obviously they don't need time to find a replacement, so you shouldn't give them time. Just wait until your last day before the class starts and tell them you quit.


This.


OP, you answered your own question. Think about what you just asked us...


"Hey GT, the company I work at is run by a bunch of shady, vindictive managers that have fired people as soon as they have put in their notice, and I'm wondering...should I put in a 2 week notice?"


Now, how dumb does that question sound.

Kevinr20
11-11-2012, 12:40
This.


OP, you answered your own question. Think about what you just asked us...


"Hey GT, the company I work at is run by a bunch of shady, vindictive managers that have fired people as soon as they have put in their notice, and I'm wondering...should I put in a 2 week notice?"


Now, how dumb does that question sound.

If it were as easy and clear cut as you make it sound, I wouldn't have asked the question. What if I need them as a professional reference later on down the road?


It's a rock and a hard place but I gotta go with what pays my bills and risking being unemployed for 2 weeks doesn't pay my bills.

Smokin45
11-11-2012, 12:42
If you live in a right to work state, I say screw em and not say anything if you they they will let you go on the spot..

Kevinr20
11-11-2012, 12:45
If your managers are vindictive *******s who fire people as soon as they put in their notice, then they don't need the courtesy of two weeks notice. Two weeks notice is supposed to give them time to find a replacement for your position. Obviously they don't need time to find a replacement, so you shouldn't give them time. Just wait until your last day before the class starts and tell them you quit.

Sounds like you answered your own question.

I would typically say to take the high road and give notice, but I have to agree with TK on this one.

Show the same courtesy you've been shown, whatever that may be.


I pretty much already had my mind made up but just wanted the opinions of others on the matter and I think I know what I have to do.

Adjuster
11-11-2012, 12:47
It has been my experience in the corporate world that if you give a two week notice and your employer no longer wants you at the job that they still pay you for the two weeks. I don't know of any law but there must be something to it. Sometimes when you give notice the employer considers you a liability especially if you have access to finances or proprietary information. I can't imagine that if you give a two week notice that the employer can just tell you to get out without pay. That screams lawsuit.



/

tantrix
11-11-2012, 12:51
If it were as easy and clear cut as you make it sound, I wouldn't have asked the question. What if I need them as a professional reference later on down the road?


It's a rock and a hard place but I gotta go with what pays my bills and risking being unemployed for 2 weeks doesn't pay my bills.

No, it's pretty clear cut, and this is why. Let me quote you again:

My company is run by a bunch of shady, vindictive managers that have fired people as soon as they have put in their notice. Let's just say the way they treat employees is the main reason I'm leaving.

Does this sound like an employer that's going to give you a good reference one way or the other? My gut tells me you're screwed using them for a reference rather you give notice or not, that's why I said just go ahead and work until your last day.

You can either:

A: Work up until your last day then leave, and get paid their wages.

or

B: Give notice, likely get fired anyway, then have to go through the process to draw unemployment which will be less than their wages.


It's a no brainer, at least to me. Like you said, you gotta pay your bills...and being fired or "let go" after putting in your notice isn't going to do that.

Kevinr20
11-11-2012, 12:53
It has been my experience in the corporate world that if you give a two week notice and your employer no longer wants you at the job that they still pay you for the two weeks. I don't know of any law but there must be something to it. Sometimes when you give notice the employer considers you a liability especially if you have access to finances or proprietary information. I can't imagine that if you give a two week notice that the employer can just tell you to get out without pay. That screams lawsuit.



/

They absolutely can tell you to go home without pay. At least in a right to work state. And yes most "moral" companies would do the right thing and keep you on or pay you for your last two weeks while you sit at home but I'm dealing with a less than moral company.

Sent from my DROID RAZR

RenoF250
11-11-2012, 12:53
If it were as easy and clear cut as you make it sound, I wouldn't have asked the question. What if I need them as a professional reference later on down the road?


It's a rock and a hard place but I gotta go with what pays my bills and risking being unemployed for 2 weeks doesn't pay my bills.

If they are as shady and vindictive as you say they will not give you a good reference anyway.

Z71bill
11-11-2012, 13:00
If you put in your 2 week notice they have to pay you for the hours you would work whether you work or not. If they decide to let you go right away after you put in your notice they are required by law to pay you.

Unless there is a blatant violation of company policy most employers try to avoid firing someone after they give notice. Often the person will be removed from anything sensitive and someone will be assigned to babysit them until they leave.

Most states are considered at will employment meaning the employer or employee can terminate employment with no notice. However, if you leave with no notice most companies consider you not able to be rehired which tends to raise flags with future employers.

Sounds like a policy at a specific company - or maybe a union contract thing. Never heard of a federal law that said anything like this.

I recall one situation where I was going through progressive discipline with a guy - he had been with the company for a long time - never was any good - I inherited him in a reorganization.

I knew - personnel knew - and he even knew as soon as he started reporting to me that his days were numbered. It was just a matter of time until I could get the required documentation.

He was a member of 2 "protected" classes - if he would have been a white 35 year male old I would have fired him on day one.

After warning 1,2 and 3 he was within a few days of the final deadline where if specific goals were not reached he was to be terminated - he came in to my office and told me he was going to put in his resignation.

I thought GREAT - I do not like firing people - even if they are poor employees.

Then he hands me his resignation - and it says his final day will be in 6 months. He had a smug look on his face - like I got you cornered. :tongueout::supergrin:

He started right in with - if you fire me you have to pay me through my resignation date. :upeyes:

That was his last day on the job - I took his security badge, parking sticker and watched him drive off the lot - told security to not let him back on the property.


I did pay him until the date his final warning would have hit. Guess I have a soft spot - or maybe personnel made me - can't recall.

JBaird22
11-11-2012, 13:01
My employer tells you to take a hike after you put in notice. They make you burn any comp time or vacation time you have accrued and then forget to put the remainder on your last check.

I'd say not give notice and stay at your new job long enough you don't need the reference of your old job.

TK-421
11-11-2012, 13:05
If it were as easy and clear cut as you make it sound, I wouldn't have asked the question. What if I need them as a professional reference later on down the road?



I'm with Reno on this one, if they are what you say they are, there's no way in hell I'd ever put them down as a reference. So I wouldn't worry about being polite when I leave. Because, from what you say, they won't be polite when they give you the boot, if you put in your two weeks, so there's no reason to be nice, because you'll get nothing but a foot up your a** in return.

Sporaticus
11-11-2012, 13:45
Give them two weeks notice on what you want to be your last day. Then they fire you, and you start the next week. If they are like you say, they won't be a good reference anyway.

Mrs. VR
11-11-2012, 13:49
I'm with Reno on this one, if they are what you say they are, there's no way in hell I'd ever put them down as a reference. So I wouldn't worry about being polite when I leave. Because, from what you say, they won't be polite when they give you the boot, if you put in your two weeks, so there's no reason to be nice, because you'll get nothing but a foot up your a** in return.So you'd hand out resumes with a five year gap in it? That'd be kind of hard to explain.

Give them two weeks notice on what you want to be your last day. Then they fire you, and you start the next week. If they are like you say, they won't be a good reference anyway.
This is a risky roll of the the dice that could work beautifully *IF* the current employer acts as expected, but it also has the potential to backfire, mightily.

Batesmotel
11-11-2012, 13:53
I worked for a company like that. One day I got into it with the latest in a string of corrupt managers corporate sent us. I picked up his phone and dialed. I called a school district that wanted me to return to teaching.He had no idea I was a teacher before. I punched out, cleaned out my locker, dropped my keys to my supervisor and left.

Loyalty on their end stopped when the new owners took over. They would fire you over anything. No notice. No reprimand. No probation. Just one mistake and out.

Problem was they would set you up in a catch 22. They would give an order that violated company policy. Obey the order and violate policy, Fired. Disobey the order and uphold policy, Fired.

We felt no loyalty to them at that point.

Sporaticus
11-11-2012, 13:56
This is a risky roll of the the dice that could work beautifully *IF* the current employer acts as expected, but it also has the potential to backfire, mightily.

Agreed. If they don't fire him on Friday, the result is the same since he seems to be planning on giving no notice at all.

But, if they don't dismiss him immediately, the OP can hint all day Friday that he is going to have a lot of fun the last two weeks. He is probably right that they will cut him.

Z71bill
11-11-2012, 14:03
Give them two weeks notice on what you want to be your last day. Then they fire you, and you start the next week. If they are like you say, they won't be a good reference anyway.

I like it --

Hawker Man
11-11-2012, 14:16
If you put in your 2 week notice they have to pay you for the hours you would work whether you work or not. If they decide to let you go right away after you put in your notice they are required by law to pay you.

Unless there is a blatant violation of company policy most employers try to avoid firing someone after they give notice. Often the person will be removed from anything sensitive and someone will be assigned to babysit them until they leave.

Most states are considered at will employment meaning the employer or employee can terminate employment with no notice. However, if you leave with no notice most companies consider you not able to be rehired which tends to raise flags with future employers.

I would give notice in writing to the boss and I would also include Human Resources, If they fire you on the spot you might have to fight for the two weeks pay and it will be easier if you give written notice. I can just about guarantee there is nowhere in the hand book that says giving two weeks notice is grounds for firing.

MAC702
11-11-2012, 14:30
...My company is run by a bunch of shady, vindictive managers that have fired people as soon as they have put in their notice...

Remember that "professional courtesy" is reserved for other professionals who demonstrate courtesy themselves.

hogfish
11-11-2012, 16:33
I don't know if it's possible but, how about a two-weeks notice via certified mail with copy to...?

:dunno:

davsco
11-11-2012, 17:49
give the two week's notice. if they fire you on the spot, might have a claim for unemployment. but in any event, you will have two weeks to go out and have fun, catch up on chores, see some relatives, etc. enjoy the two weeks even if unpaid as you will be busy with your new job.

davsco
11-11-2012, 17:52
If you put in your 2 week notice they have to pay you for the hours you would work whether you work or not. If they decide to let you go right away after you put in your notice they are required by law to pay you.

Most states are considered at will employment meaning the employer or employee can terminate employment with no notice.

these two paragraphs appear to contradict each other.

MAC702
11-11-2012, 18:06
If you put in your 2 week notice they have to pay you for the hours you would work whether you work or not. If they decide to let you go right away after you put in your notice they are required by law to pay you....

Is this an Alaska law? Because I've never heard of it.

The OP didn't specify his state, and only put "America" in his profile, so he didn't do a good job at asking the question.

tslex
11-11-2012, 18:12
If you put in your 2 week notice they have to pay you for the hours you would work whether you work or not. If they decide to let you go right away after you put in your notice they are required by law to pay you.



In what state? And did you go to law school there?

Because if you cite the statute, I'll believe you. (I don't pretend an encyclopedic knowledge of all state's employment laws, so such a provision may exist, I suppose.) But otherwise I call this errant nonsense.

OP, in a right to work state -- barring the existence of an employment agreement -- you can be fired at any time for any reason or for no reason at all (just not for a prohibited reason, say, because you belong to a protected class or as a retaliatory discharge in response to your exercise of a right protected by law or the constitution.) Likewise, in an RTW state, you can terminate your employment at anytime.

Two weeks notice by the employee and some sort of severance by the employer are common professional courtesies, but are not the law. If this company has responded to two-weeks notice with immediate termination, they have lost the right to expect that courtesy.

DISCLAIMER: I AM A LAWYER BUT I AM NOT YOUR LAWYER. FREE LEGAL ADVICE IS WORTH WHAT YOU PAY FOR IT. DO NOT TAUNT HAPPY FUN BALL.

Gallium
11-11-2012, 18:17
Give them two weeks notice on what you want to be your last day. Then they fire you, and you start the next week. If they are like you say, they won't be a good reference anyway.


Exactly what I was going to propose, based on his depiction of how shady they were/are.

You might also want to dial your home phone when you doing this.

F350
11-11-2012, 20:58
If your managers are vindictive *******s who fire people as soon as they put in their notice, then they don't need the courtesy of two weeks notice. Two weeks notice is supposed to give them time to find a replacement for your position. Obviously they don't need time to find a replacement, so you shouldn't give them time. Just wait until your last day before the class starts and tell them you quit.

IF they are as you say; and you know of them firing people when they give notice....... just don't show up for work on the first day of training and let them figure it out; you're not a slave.

TK-421
11-11-2012, 21:02
So you'd hand out resumes with a five year gap in it? That'd be kind of hard to explain.


I never said that, I would put them down on my resume, since I worked for them, I just wouldn't use them as a reference or put any kind of contact info down for them. If they ask me about it, I'll explain the situation. If they don't ask about it, I won't offer up the info.

devildog2067
11-12-2012, 09:52
My employer tells you to take a hike after you put in notice. They make you burn any comp time or vacation time you have accrued and then forget to put the remainder on your last check.


Why do you work there?

lunarspeak
11-12-2012, 10:12
would they give you two weeks notice before they fire you??

just dip out,,if you have stuff there id go ahead and get it out..i work at a billion dollar multinaitional company,and when people are fired they are walked straight to the door and thier desks/lockers are cleared out and usually picked over for any goods before being sent to thier homes.

once a guy was fired and our monthly bonuses were delayed a week so they wouldnt have to give him one.

how about 2 or 3 days notice

Vic777
11-12-2012, 10:33
My company is run by a bunch of shady, vindictive managers that have fired people as soon as they have put in their notice. Let's just say the way they treat employees is the main reason I'm leaving.You have your answer.

badge315
11-12-2012, 10:41
If you already have a new job lined up, why are you so concerned about using your current employer as a reference?:dunno:

If they're as crappy as you say, I'd give no notice at all...**** 'em.