21 weeks down, 6 to go [Archive] - Glock Talk

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KiloBravo
11-11-2012, 14:46
I have six weeks left at the academy. It is not over yet, so I am still continuing to push. I am beyond ready for it to be over so that I can start the actual career that I signed up for.

Please continue to keep me in your thoughts and prayers. I sure do appreciate it. :wavey:

DaBigBR
11-11-2012, 14:52
Thanks for the update. Home stretch!

trdvet
11-11-2012, 15:00
Almost there!

kgain673
11-11-2012, 15:00
get your mind ready for field training, field training is harder then the academy by far. And I went to a live in academy as well. Nothing can get you ready for that " What the Hell do I do ?" moment/s you have on field training. If you have a good trainer he will push you to your limits, so when you get cut loose you can take care of yourself. I had a harddddddd ass for a field trainer (top guy at the barrack). Good luck in the last stages of the academy, what ever you do PROTECT YOUR BODY, DON'T DO ANYTHING STUPID TO GET HURT! And don't freaking lie, we had one guy get fired the week of graduation for something that happened months prior.

Patchman
11-11-2012, 15:44
Six more weeks remaining of your paid vacation. Then you're going to get thrown into the real world. I know right now you must be going stir crazy, and suffering cabin fever with your fellow recruits, but savor the next six weeks.

If you need a phone call to be made, let me know. :whistling:

After all you've been through and have achieved, I'm excited for you!

Officer X
11-11-2012, 16:04
Keep the faith

Folsom_Prison
11-11-2012, 16:10
Hang in there Kyle!!

tusk212
11-11-2012, 16:19
I was just at your academy a few weeks ago.

RyanNREMTP
11-11-2012, 16:38
In other words in seven weeks you'll be wishing you were still in the academy.

Sent from my Federation issued communicator.

Vigilant
11-11-2012, 16:52
Best of wishes. When they turn you loose on the road, send us some business.

4949shooter
11-11-2012, 18:34
Graduation will be here before you know it.

rudeboy3
11-11-2012, 20:02
It should start getting fun soon...As for FTO, I actually kinda liked it, it was stressful, annoying at times but at the same time it was really good knowing that even if you didnt exactly know what to do, my FTO had my back. I had probably the some of the best FTOs in my department and I am grateful for that. Tell you what was stressful....The first day off FTO, im sure some of you guys know what I am talking about.

Agent6-3/8
11-12-2012, 00:39
Almost there!

As other have said, take care of yourself and don't get injured this late in the academy. One if the guys in my class busted up his elbow playing basketball the last week and was still on light duty as the rest of us were finishing FTO. A few months later.

FTO will be stressful, but focus on good officer safety and soaking up the knowledge your FTO is trying to pass on to you. Be formal, respectful and polite with your coworkers. My personal rule of thumb is to 'sir' everyone to death until they tell me not to. Keep your uniform neat and boots polished. No one expects you to know everything, but having a good attitude, looking squared away and practicing good officer safety will go a long way toward earning the trust and respect of your coworkers.


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Hack
11-12-2012, 03:59
Best of luck.

Sent from my communicator.

CJStudent
11-12-2012, 10:27
Almost there!

As other have said, take care of yourself and don't get injured this late in the academy. One if the guys in my class busted up his elbow playing basketball the last week and was still on light duty as the rest of us were finishing FTO. A few months later.

FTO will be stressful, but focus on good officer safety and soaking up the knowledge your FTO is trying to pass on to you. Be formal, respectful and polite with your coworkers. My personal rule of thumb is to 'sir' everyone to death until they tell me not to. Keep your uniform neat and boots polished. No one expects you to know everything, but having a good attitude, looking squared away and practicing good officer safety will go a long way toward earning the trust and respect of your coworkers.


Posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire (http://www.outdoorhub.com/mobile/)

Some of the best advice I've seen. In other words, don't you go and do somethin' stupid, now! :tongueout:

Panzergrenadier1979
11-12-2012, 10:31
Most important of all:

Learning how to exit/re-enter your patrol car WHILE wearing your smokey WITHOUT getting the chin-strap caught under your nose and pulling your face up over your scalp. :tongueout:

KiloBravo
11-12-2012, 10:44
Most important of all:

Learning how to exit/re-enter your patrol car WHILE wearing your smokey WITHOUT getting the chin-strap caught under your nose and pulling your face up over your scalp. :tongueout:

This is most important for sure! haha...

During some of the driver training, the instructors had us wear the covers while getting in and out of the car on mock traffic stops, to show us just how difficult that can be when you get in too much of a hurry. :supergrin:

cowboywannabe
11-12-2012, 11:15
youll hear this many times after you graduate: always watch the hands.

GRIMLET
11-12-2012, 11:58
It should start getting fun soon...As for FTO, I actually kinda liked it, it was stressful, annoying at times but at the same time it was really good knowing that even if you didnt exactly know what to do, my FTO had my back. I had probably the some of the best FTOs in my department and I am grateful for that. Tell you what was stressful....The first day off FTO, im sure some of you guys know what I am talking about.

As an FTO, I had a newbee tell me he had to take Valium because I was stressing him out. And Im the nice FTO.
They then reassigned him to a REAL hardass FTO. That was really fun to watch.

The trainees who will listen and learn do well. Sometimes the FTO will stress you some to see when you will stand up for yourself. I call it - Finding the inner you.
Some never do and cant be trusted to back you up.


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Panzergrenadier1979
11-12-2012, 14:50
During some of the driver training, the instructors had us wear the covers while getting in and out of the car on mock traffic stops, to show us just how difficult that can be when you get in too much of a hurry. :supergrin:

It is definitely an acquired skill lol! I avoid wearing the stupid thing as much as possible. Our local PSP almost never wear theirs.

I remember struggling with an EDP once and being furious when my back-up officer took the time to put their smokey on before assisting me.:steamed: