B-52 fly by [Archive] - Glock Talk

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ithaca_deerslayer
11-11-2012, 19:39
http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/3yk1Bg/:1Fr_9He8N:EsIxCzny/www.strategypage.com/military_photos/military_photos_2006632950.aspx/

Aircraft carrier tower: "We can't see you".

B-52 pilot: "Look down".

:rofl:

packin23
11-11-2012, 19:42
That is an awesome picture and cool story to go with it.

TK-421
11-11-2012, 19:42
Yeah, that's how bada** our boys are. :cool:

NH Trucker
11-11-2012, 19:44
http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/3yk1Bg/:1Fr_9He8N:EsIxCzny/www.strategypage.com/military_photos/military_photos_2006632950.aspx/

Aircraft carrier tower: "We can't see you".

B-52 pilot: "Look down".

:rofl:





I've stood next to a B-52. That's a MASSIVE aircraft to be flying that low! Absolutely incredible show of skill right there! :wow:

rednoved
11-11-2012, 19:48
Awesome.

Bruce M
11-11-2012, 19:48
Wow - very impressive.

robin303
11-11-2012, 19:51
:thumbsup: Now that is kewl

1-2man
11-11-2012, 20:03
Awesome pic.

janice6
11-11-2012, 20:06
That is fantastic, thank you.

Scott3670
11-11-2012, 20:09
Yeah, that's how bada** our boys are. :cool:

That doesn't even begin to describe our boys. Balls of granite, I tell ya.

m2hmghb
11-11-2012, 20:11
Awesome picture. The amazing thing about the B52 is that today's pilots could be the grandchildren of the pilots in the 50s. It's the only aircraft we use that could possibly have the great grandchildren of an original plane piloting it.

MulletLoad
11-11-2012, 20:14
A Bud holland special?

I'll let the B52 drivers comment for accuracy.

bunk22
11-11-2012, 20:31
Seen it before and every time, it sill looks cool :cool:

Hurricanes
11-11-2012, 20:34
I went to an Air Show last weekend at Homestead Air Reserve Base. They had a B-52 there(as well as other aircraft) for people to get up-close with. Certainly was amazing to touch an aircraft that has some great history. Here are some pics if the OP does not mind.
-Joel

http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c370/Blackbirdm6/photo-37.jpg

http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c370/Blackbirdm6/photo-40.jpg

http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c370/Blackbirdm6/photo-38.jpg

http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c370/Blackbirdm6/photo-35.jpg

ithaca_deerslayer
11-11-2012, 20:44
I went to an Air Show last weekend at Homestead Air Reserve Base. They had a B-52 there(as well as other aircraft) for people to get up-close with. Certainly was amazing to touch an aircraft that has some great history. Here are some pics if the OP does not mind.

Those are some great shots! Thanks :)

Jgriggs
11-11-2012, 20:45
Awesome picture. The amazing thing about the B52 is that today's pilots could be the grandchildren of the pilots in the 50s. It's the only aircraft we use that could possibly have the great grandchildren of an original plane piloting it.

The B-52s in service today were all built in 60 and 61.
more than 50 years old. Not 50 years for the type, but each specific plane. these planes are veterans of Vietnam, the cold war, desert storm, and now Iraq and Afghanistan. To say nothing of smaller conflicts.
These same aircraft were in service when Kennedy was elected.
I have worked on them at Minot, during that time I was struck by all the history they must have seen; all the history they must have taken part in. That I was able to do my part to keep them flying is something that I take some pride in. They really are very bad*****

m2hmghb
11-11-2012, 21:06
My father was a flying crew chief during Linebacker 2. The B52 is supposed to be in service until 2025 at the earliest, I've heard 2040 and 2050 thrown around as well. It goes to show how well built they are.

TK-421
11-11-2012, 21:13
My father was a flying crew chief during Linebacker 2. The B52 is supposed to be in service until 2025 at the earliest, I've heard 2040 and 2050 thrown around as well. It goes to show how well built they are.

Now if only our cars could be built half as well. :rofl:

Trapped_in_Kali
11-11-2012, 21:13
Very cool!

Bomber Nav
11-11-2012, 22:04
Yes, it's a GREAT aircraft. It's labor intensive now to keep them flying, but they are incredibly versatile in what they can carry, and have tremendous advantages in (long) range and bomb load capabilities. My hours are in G models, with some hours in the "H" model, which is the only ones still flying. Flying low level (terrain avoidance) in the mountains at night was really something. RED FLAG missions were fun also - something about cruising a few hundred feet off the desert floor trying not to be seen by defending F-15s really got your excitement going. Gosh, I miss those days... sometimes.

dakrat
11-11-2012, 22:07
It says its not photochopped. I am having a hard time believing.too much risk and very little reward, if any. cost of B-52, USS Ranger and everyone's lives in that picture is at stake. explain that to the Sec of Def. shady website as well. I have been around B-52 for 6 years and love the plane. never seen this picture before. you would think this is one of the most common ones, if it was real.

dakrat
11-11-2012, 22:11
something about cruising a few hundred feet off the desert floor trying not to be seen by defending F-15s really got your excitement going. Gosh, I miss those days... sometimes.

what operation was this? desert is post stealth era

m2hmghb
11-11-2012, 22:47
It says its not photochopped. I am having a hard time believing.too much risk and very little reward, if any. cost of B-52, USS Ranger and everyone's lives in that picture is at stake. explain that to the Sec of Def. shady website as well. I have been around B-52 for 6 years and love the plane. never seen this picture before. you would think this is one of the most common ones, if it was real.


It's less risky then flying that height over land. Power lines, buildings, small hills, trees and so on can knock the plane down. As was said they did fly that low to get under radar, and there were cases where they were flying low on CAS missions to prevent any kind of drift during an airstrike.

mglindo
11-11-2012, 22:55
what operation was this? desert is post stealth era

Red Flag exercises, http://www.nellis.af.mil/library/flyingoperations.asp

air to air combat exercise/competition.

Hauptmann6
11-11-2012, 22:56
what operation was this? desert is post stealth era

Red flag. It's an annual exercise in Nevada. Look it up online.

Pwhfirefighter
11-11-2012, 23:00
Awesome picture. The amazing thing about the B52 is that today's pilots could be the grandchildren of the pilots in the 50s. It's the only aircraft we use that could possibly have the great grandchildren of an original plane piloting it.

Well not exactly the only one, the KC-135 entered service in 1956ish,which is just a few years after the B-52 entered service. The aircraft my Guard unit had were built in '57, '58, and '59 and projected to fly into the 2030's. Re-engined, but still same airframe.

Blast
11-11-2012, 23:11
Awesome.:rock:


http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/2-B52-flyby.jpg

http://tailhookdaily.typepad.com/tailhook_daily_briefing/WindowsLiveWriter/b-52%20ranger.jpg

Mostly 9
11-12-2012, 01:41
It's less risky then flying that height over land. Power lines, buildings, small hills, trees and so on can knock the plane down. As was said they did fly that low to get under radar, and there were cases where they were flying low on CAS missions to prevent any kind of drift during an airstrike.

Yeah, what about hitting a periscope?

Jgriggs
11-12-2012, 04:10
These pictures bring back some good memories.
We used to laugh at the Iraqi republican guard for surrendering to anything that moved.
But ok, here we are 20 yrs down the road, and I can tell you that our B52 used to make mock bomb runs on the base. If you've never seen them at close to 500kts on the deck with the bomb bay doors open, then you've never really crapped yer self.

gwalchmai
11-12-2012, 05:56
They used to do bombing runs on our missile sites in Montana at around 200ft. They start out as a dot on the horizon and get bigger for what seems like an hour. Once you can see the exhaust they're pretty close. Then they go over and you're dead.

I've seen 'em come out of nowhere (in GA no less) and it seemed they were literally just over the treetops.

John43
11-12-2012, 07:00
We were in Australia in 1967 and one of our pilots requested a low level flyover from the tower, they had prop aircraft in their squadrons. They said no and he did it anyway. He also came in over the runway upside down. Check out the RA-3b aircraft at the websites of vap61vap62 or Vappers. This aircraft first flew in 1950 and still flies today at Raytheon in Cal as a missile test bed. That is 62 years, although it is civilian now. This also was the largest jet aircraft to trap aboard the carriers.

Jon_R
11-12-2012, 18:49
Yeah, what about hitting a periscope?

A dolphin jumps into the engine? :whistling:

Cool pics. I saw the story in Desert Storm 1 when some blackhawks went to pick up some Spec Ops that got discovered deep into Iraq and where taking a lot of fire. The blackhawks were screaming across the desert nap of the earth went to slide over a hill and had to ascend quickly because of a surprised camel on the crest. That is pretty low when you are dodging animals in flight.

gwalchmai
11-12-2012, 18:56
I read an account of a P-51 coming back from strafing runs in France with rutabagas in its radiator scoop. Or maybe it was beets.

TK-421
11-12-2012, 19:01
I saw the story in Desert Storm 1 when some blackhawks went to pick up some Spec Ops that got discovered deep into Iraq and where taking a lot of fire. The blackhawks were screaming across the desert nap of the earth went to slide over a hill and had to ascend quickly because of a surprised camel on the crest. That is pretty low when you are dodging animals in flight.

http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_ma23vajMaW1rbb8yio1_400.gif

K.Kiser
11-12-2012, 19:07
I've was born and have lived for 35 years next to the largest depot of five-deuces in the world.. I see many every day, and they are still awesome... They are big and lumbering looking flying nose down to to excessive wing lift, but alot of people don't realize that those big sunnavab##ch$ can bring the heat down on the deck...

I'm very used to seeing and hearing them, but sometimes with an open mind I look up at them going over, and the sight and sound of those beasts must have a heavy psychological effect on the enemy that have probably never seen a craft like that... Oh yeah, especially when the belly door open and cargo starts following gravity...

bdhawk
11-12-2012, 20:10
when i was working the oilfields in northwest wyoming, B52s would make fake bombing runs on some of the oil rigs there. pretty exciting stuff.

maybe they could do double duty as cropdusters...:whistling:

ithaca_deerslayer
11-12-2012, 20:15
I read an account of a P-51 coming back from strafing runs in France with rutabagas in its radiator scoop. Or maybe it was beets.

Turnip.

And I assume someone through it there.

Caver 60
11-12-2012, 20:24
Most of my B-52 time was in the good old B-52D model, the workhorse in Viet Nam. It was an old plane when I started flying it in 1966. I've also flown C's, E's, F's, and G's. I had over 300 bombing missions in SEA.

We could carry a max load of 108 bombs weighting 64,500 pounds. Although most of our missions only carried about 80 some odd bombs and weighted in the mid 50,000 pound range.

In those days, the rest of the B-52's could only carry 27 iron bombs. The one thing I never forgave Reagan for was putting the D's in the bone yard to get the B-1 online. Carter was not an aeronautical engineer, but he knew how to read design specifications. He knew the B-1 was not living up to original design spec's. So he cancelled it.

The B-52D had just been rebuilt to fly for decades more. New wings, engines, latest avionics, airframe strengthening, etc. Reagan put it in the bone yard.

gwalchmai
11-12-2012, 20:49
Turnip.

And I assume someone through it there.Yeah, that's right. It was a turnip. I always wondered how it happened because I thought the prop would be lower than the scoop.

CBennett
11-12-2012, 20:50
nice!

deutscheglocker
11-12-2012, 20:59
I believe some of the bombing runs around DaNang and other places were called "Rolling Thunder " IIRC.

Only heard ( and Felt) that once while at DaNang airfield in 72.

This one made an emergency landing at our field and was said to have had an unexploded SAM missile in the wing.

This pic was from across the airfield. Can't remember if it was 71 or 72.

Caver 60-- This wasn't your plane was it :).

http://i94.photobucket.com/albums/l103/poofy27/006-3.jpg

m2hmghb
11-12-2012, 21:14
Rolling thunder was in the mid to late 60s, linebacker was the 70s.

deutscheglocker
11-12-2012, 21:27
Rolling thunder was in the mid to late 60s, linebacker was the 70s.

Thanks for the clarification. I just remember guys talking about "Rolling Thunder" and assumed as I did.

Caver 60
11-12-2012, 22:29
The picture looks like a tall tail i,e, 'D' model. I can't read the tail number, but I never landed at DaNang or actually got struck by a SAM. I probably did fly that plane at one time or another. We never had a permanent tail number assigned to a crew. We just flew the plane they had ready for any given mission.

I am pretty sure it was DaNang, if my memory serves me correctly (somewhere about 68 or late 67) that a D model tried an emergency landing there after getting hit with a SAM. He had an engine or two out and could not get his flaps down.

The old B-52 no flap procedure was faulty and had you coming in way too hot with no drag devices out other than the landing gear. Not only that, in those days they wouldn't let you practice no flap approaches in a B-52. Then the guy added a few more knots of airspeed for the engines out and a few more knots for mamma and the kids.

He floated for most of the runway before he touched down way too hot to stop on what runway was left in front of him. Everybody was killed but the gunner. He only got out because a fire truck knocked the turret loose and gave him a way out.

Boeing changed the no flap procedure right after that, and SAC started letting crews practice no flap approaches.

Caver 60
11-12-2012, 22:38
Best I remember, Rolling Thunder was a nickname given to a fighter operation over there early on. Then later the term came to be applied to B-52 strikes, because on the ground that's what it sounded like.

I know a Army guy that was in choppers over there, and one day he got a little too close to a B-52 strike. He survived unharmed, but he said it wasn't any fun. And he heard many B-52 strikes around some of the areas he was in.

Of course we never heard anything, since we were above 30,000 feet. But you sure could feel that plane get light fast when you lost 50 some odd thousand pounds of weight in 15 or 20 seconds.

F14Scott
11-12-2012, 22:42
Caver60, does the Buff have a terrain following radar? I assume it has a RADALT.

TK-421
11-12-2012, 22:51
Best I remember, Rolling Thunder was a nickname given to a fighter operation over there early on. Then later the term came to be applied to B-52 strikes, because on the ground that's what it sounded like.

I know a Army guy that was in choppers over there, and one day he got a little too close to a B-52 strike. He survived unharmed, but he said it wasn't any fun. And he heard many B-52 strikes around some of the areas he was in.

Of course we never heard anything, since we were above 30,000 feet. But you sure could feel that plane get light fast when you lost 50 some odd thousand pounds of weight in 15 or 20 seconds.

Alright, I'm jealous, I'd love to fly in a B-52, that is such a gorgeous plane.

Caver 60
11-13-2012, 06:14
Caver60, does the Buff have a terrain following radar? I assume it has a RADALT.

In those days it had a terrain following radar, but it was very crude, compared to what they have now days. The later models had much better equipment. I assume the term RADALT. Means radar altimeter. Yes we had one, even in those days.