people who quit without notice or job lined up [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Diesel McBadass
11-24-2012, 20:49
Now, i have seen quite a few people quit jobs ive worked at or jobs friends have. Many people quit on the spot, alk out during a shift, etc. Almost none give a notice. A 2 weeks notice is a courtesy i would give.

What i cant understand though, is these people almost never have another job lined up. They aren't quitting to start a new job. they are just quitting because they dont like where there at and apparently would rather make no money and be broke?

What am i missing here?

Berto
11-24-2012, 20:58
Emotionally underdeveloped, not concerned with consequences, just feeling good.

robin303
11-24-2012, 21:06
Maybe it's not their thing or its to hard for them or didn't like the job or the people they have to work with. :dunno:
I'm a General Contractor and I had people quit before lunch on their 1st day and had people work for me 10 yrs+.

rednoved
11-24-2012, 21:17
I did it in once in high school. I was working two jobs. One as a butcher, and one in retail. I quit the butcher job to make more time for my girlfriend and try to enjoy my senior year. A couple months later I quit the retail job at the mall because it really sucked. I ran out of money real quick, but I sure did enjoy the free time I had to spend with friends and enjoy high school. I had a whole month and a half off. :rofl:

CAcop
11-24-2012, 21:21
I've seen it mostly with low end jobs just because with those jobs they are just looking for a warm body. Sometimes it happens with better paying jubs because they just can't stand it anymore.

TK-421
11-24-2012, 21:21
They know the government will support them while they sit at home watching TV.

K.Kiser
11-24-2012, 21:25
Lots of different reasons, including those listed above... I've done it before, but been at this job for 10 years... I'm the type of person that can take a whoooole lot of crap, and have a very strong will power to stick something out against everything inside telling me otherwise... The downfall to that is I can operate for a long time on that ragged edge, and with that the time of the breaking point is unpredictable...

When I've had enough it's after a extended time period of frustration, and it comes on real quick when it finally happens... It's usually when I feel like someone is testing my limits without a real constructive reason to do so... The best thing at that point for everyone is for me to remove myself and go on with my life... This is not something that I have mistaken for a strength, I do recognize it as a fault...

I've known alot of people that are habitual and irresponsible quiters just due to the fact that they have little concern about anything, and typically shrug their shoulders at most events of life... That is most definitely not me but I've seen it many times, especially in the construction trade..

Ferdinandd
11-24-2012, 21:29
Back in 2008/09 when things were slowing down economically, the plant where I work offered voluntary lay-off. The acceptants of it were the first ones I'd have canned if the choice were mine. They receiveved unemployment as long as they could. I don't think that any of these folks were hired back in when we cranked up in 2010.

pennlineman
11-24-2012, 21:30
I work construction. Most of the guys who quit without notice are young. Have very few if any bills. And usually have some sort of support system such as parents or a girl friend that will put up with it. No responsibilty, no cares.

RWBlue
11-24-2012, 21:44
Several years back.....

I had a relative do it. He had nothing lined up. He had a hard time find the next spot. He grew up a little over those months.

I saw a senior unix administrator do it in a meeting when the PM decided to schedule him to work 36 hours straight. No one else who could do the work would. We all claimed ignorance until the PM was canned. As a side note this Unix admin we X-special forces or Seal or.....Sorry memory is fading. It is not that he could not stay up that long. It was that the PM was always pulling this crap and he finally had the power to do something about it.

MasterShake
11-24-2012, 22:08
What you're missing here is there's people who just don't like to think before they act.

TBO
11-24-2012, 22:52
Some people are unable to look down the road, even five minutes.

RayB
11-24-2012, 23:01
Or...

Consider that there are common courtesies shared with a certain reciprocity between both parties. Sometimes, it is the employer that is less than honorable...

In an instance where the employer was less-than-honest, or otherwise failed to hold up his end of the understanding that was shared when the employee was hired, the employee has every right, IMO, to walk off the job without notice.

Professional salespeople, in particular, are vulnerable to unscrupulous employers that don't mind paying everybody that benefitted from a sale—except the guy that sold it! I've seen this several times over decades...

On one occasion, I filed for UCB right from my desk, while I was still working for the guy—and I got it! He wasn't happy about that... But then again, he was only happy when he was screwing people!

On another occasion, I filed for UCB before a "Big Meeting" where a fabulous opportunity supposedly awaited me. I listened to the asinine proposal, told them I needed a day to think about it; then let it drag on through the weekend, and promptly resigned on Monday—and won my UCB decision!

On one occasion, I gave two weeks notice in writing, via Fed Ex, the day my two-week vacation commenced. I'd been with this company nine years, was promoted twice (having turned two promotions down), and won every sales award they could offer. As it turned out, my timing was perfect, as a wave of mergers, demotions, and dismissals soon followed!

On another occasion, I gave notice to my boss at a trade show we were working, after he'd jacked me around the day before in front of some prospects (one of whom was the wife of my next employer)... So, on my break I went two aisles over with my resume and photo album, and was offered a job the very next day! Since my old boss didn’t want me following up on the prospects from the trade show, he dismissed me in lieu of notice and I got UCB for the two weeks before I started the new job!

On one truly memorable occasion, I locked my keys in my desk on Christmas eve day, faxed my resignation to corporate, and locked myself out of the office. When I got home and told my wife, she cried and hugged me; and we celebrated—hard! The store closed three months later, having tried three other managers after me... After that, another location closed, and today they have but one struggling store that turns people like popcorn.

Just saying, it isn’t always the employee...

--Ray

ray9898
11-24-2012, 23:43
Some people are just dumb.

Folsom_Prison
11-24-2012, 23:51
I've had jobs in the past where I just wanted to say F it! Total suck jobs, crap pay! even though I never acted on the urge, I came damn close!

kenpoprofessor
11-25-2012, 03:14
Had a very good friend of mine just up and quit, got so fed up with management taking advantage of him he decided to remove himself from the equation.

He had a hard time finding a job for 6mo.. I talked to a guy who's company was hiring and next thing you know, he's got a job that pays twice as much, and for better people. He's been there almost 3 years now.

Have a great gun carryin' Kenpo day

Clyde

Geeorge
11-25-2012, 03:35
I would rather MAKE them fire me:wavey:

legalsten
11-25-2012, 04:04
I would agree that most of the time it is a stupid move by a younger person . I have done it twice at the same place . I walked out after 8 years at a Governmet job with good benifits . The Boss was terrible and the politics were even worse . After leaving his boss did some checking and I was asked if I would return . This was several weeks later and I did return and worked for another 7 years there.

New younger boss , who was one of the biggest slackers we had , was now trying to prove something so we locked horns big time for a few years . Again I had enough and left again without any notice . In the office and one thing leads to another and before it was over I was leaving again. I had another job in about a week. Several years later the same boss even asked me to apply for a job with them again. Maybe we both grew up a little . I even got to the final interview and decided it would probably be the same mess all over again.

I do beleive giving a notice is the proper thing to do . It is out of respect and courtesy that you leave with a notice . They did not have my respect . I had a family and 2 kids to support . I never filed for any help and we did fine . I also think leaving was the best thing I ever did.

Maybe I should have given a notice , but in the past everyone I had seen give a notice at this place was rode to death . The days of finding a job around every corner are long gone and we are talking about 20 plus years ago here when I did this .

ede
11-25-2012, 04:12
if you've never dragged up you'd not understand it. my take on giving 2 weeks notice is something fools do or think they have to do. i have yet to see how it benifits me or the employer.

HandyMan Hugh
11-25-2012, 04:14
I quit a job without notice only once. I was working as a mechanic for a taxi company. The owners were cheapskates. I had complained about the lift in the garage weveral times. The lift had been installed in the 1920s in a VERY narrow bay. It still had the original head designed for the cars of its day. The lift had none of the adapters required to safely lift the cars of the late 60s and 70s. It was flat out dangerous. The owners refused to update the lift because it would have cost them, oh maybe 7 to 800 bucks.

One day I had a taxi up on the lift for some long overdue service when the car slipped sideways off of the lift. It became trapped between the top of the lift and the wall of the building. I was under it when the car slid.

I had a friend bring his pick-up truck into the shop, and loaded up all of my tools and equipment. THEN I went into the office and quit the job. It was then that they offered to replace the lift head. Too little, too late! I still get a bit angry on the rare occasions that I remember that, and that was almost 50 years ago. Cheap bastiges could have killed me.

DanaT
11-25-2012, 04:15
Or...

Consider that there are common courtesies shared with a certain reciprocity between both parties. Sometimes, it is the employer that is less than honorable...

<<<<SNIP>>>>

On one truly memorable occasion, I locked my keys in my desk on Christmas eve day, faxed my resignation to corporate, and locked myself out of the office. When I got home and told my wife, she cried and hugged me; and we celebrated—hard! The store closed three months later, having tried three other managers after me... After that, another location closed, and today they have but one struggling store that turns people like popcorn.

Just saying, it isn’t always the employee...

--Ray

You either pick very bad places to work many times over by accident or have a long history as a vindictive employee.

LoadToadBoss
11-25-2012, 05:22
I came close only once. The office manager wanted me to do something that was illegal. I refused and the office manager did it herself, but I was very uncomfortable that such activity was happening. I told her that if anything like that happened again, not only would I walk but I would call the district manager right after I called the FBI (federal fraud crime). Since other workers were aware of the issue, she straightened up and things went well after that.

happyguy
11-25-2012, 05:44
Giving notice is the gentlemanly thing to do, but there are employers that will let you go as soon as you give them notice.

Regards,
Comrade Happyguy :)

Flying-Dutchman
11-25-2012, 05:55
Giving notice is the gentlemanly thing to do, but there are employers that will let you go as soon as you give them notice.

Regards,
Comrade Happyguy :)
Yep, I have seen that happen more than once.

HexHead
11-25-2012, 06:01
I've done it a couple of times. Once with a very good paying job where I had ethical problems with what the job entailed. I went on vacation and a week later, I walked out.
The 2nd time was a part time job where the schedule turned out different than what I was told when they hired me, more than I agreed to. I emailed the boss about it and asked to work the days I originally agreed to. He replied that I had to work the schedule. I replied to him "That tears it" and got up and left.

How many companies these days give people notice when they let them go? In fact, they usually have security escort you out now. I live in an "at will" state, and it goes both ways.

clancy
11-25-2012, 06:06
My girlfriend's 2 daughters, agged 24 and 27, both walked off a job making $14 an hour because they could no longer deal with their supervisor. After almost 2 months of no work, getting food from the food pantry, eating at a soup kitchen and our paying thier electric bill, they both found jobs at a resort as housekeepers, making $7.50 an hour. They both say they were stupid to quit the old job.

I agree.

SevenSixtyTwo
11-25-2012, 06:41
My girlfriend's 2 daughters, agged 24 and 27, both walked off a job making $14 an hour because they could no longer deal with their supervisor. After almost 2 months of no work, getting food from the food pantry, eating at a soup kitchen and our paying thier electric bill, they both found jobs at a resort as housekeepers, making $7.50 an hour. They both say they were stupid to quit the old job.

I agree.

That's around the age of our two daughters. They're learning a valuable lesson. We finally stopped propping them up. They're finally starting to understand.
I've never walked off the job but I have sat down with the boss and told him I've had an offer from company X for more pay. The last one was 30+ years ago when I talked with a regional field operations manager for the company I'm with now. Starting pay was over $6.50 per hour with benefits. At the time I didn't know what a union was. I was making $3.45 per hour with company F. When I told the owner of non union company F, he said if it doesn't work out, come on back. Dad warned me of all the union pitfalls that are parroted here on GT. Maybe with Florida being a RTW state or just the industry I'm in, I haven't seen any of those pitfalls. I wouldn't quit for anything except a betting paying job.

hpracing007
11-25-2012, 07:01
I've done that. Sometimes you have to put yourself under tremendous pressure in order to accomplish a goal, and that may require you to be jobless for a year or more without a guarantee of one when it's all over. Working some safe, dead end job you hate is no way to live. Adequate savings helps too.

Diesel McBadass
11-25-2012, 07:09
I can understand if management is horrible, or unsafe conditions. Nut thats not what i see most of the time. Ive seen people quit cause tey were mad they got written up for being late 3 days in a week. I had one guy quit to take a new job. Aparently he got fired for laziness, applied somehwhere else and then called my boss asking for a reference. My boss laughed at him and said maybe call someone you didn't quit without notice on.

My friends a server at a local restaurant and had 2 girls walk out during a shift, while they still had tables they were serving and he had to take over their job. Apparently one got a job at a local strip club and the other quit because they were friends and thought it would be fun to do together.

Bosses and management can be at fault but its usaully employees from what i see.

K.Kiser
11-25-2012, 07:18
Giving notice is the gentlemanly thing to do, but there are employers that will let you go as soon as you give them notice.

In the ten years that I've been where I am now, there have been about 6-8 guys quit to move on to something else and most were pretty straight up dudes that legitimately found a better gig... Not a single one was allowed to stay after putting in their notice... My Boss can rest assured that when I get enough I will walk off at that very moment...

smokin762
11-25-2012, 07:18
I quit a job once without a 2 week notice. The other times, I gave a 2 week notice. I think it all depends if you have the option of giving a notice or not.

If you’re looking for another job, then you’re not happy with your present employer. If the other company needs you to start sooner than a 2 week notice will allow you, then I find quitting soon to be justified. If you are capable of giving a notice, then there is no reason to burn a perfectly good bridge. Sometimes, an employer will understand your leaving for more pay or advancement.

Diesel McBadass
11-25-2012, 07:23
i already told my boss I'm looking for jobs in ems and he gladly put me down as a reference. Hes had many people quit and I stayed, ive picked up extra shifts, etc. So i get better days off and a raise. A good reference. If i get a sweet new job ill definitely give a notice, time to adjust scedules and start looking for new hires. With a small workforce when someone quits it screws all the other employees. Not just the boss.

hpracing007
11-25-2012, 07:24
A quick 2 week notice story. The last place I worked, in the handbook, encouraged putting in 2 week notice. My friend put in her notice and told her new employer she could start in 2 weeks.

Old employer got her to train a different person for her role. After 1 week, told her "we don't need you anymore. don't bother showing up anymore." Sat at home a week because she didn't want to have to explain why to new employer.

No one gives that place notice anymore.

smokin762
11-25-2012, 07:38
The company that I am currently working for used to give an employee a 2 week notice that the company was letting them go. Then management would go around the plant to let us other employees know what was happening.

They don’t do this any longer.

Johnspark
11-25-2012, 07:40
There are many reasons why an employer would not want to have a person around for two weeks after giving notice.

The job may be of a sensitive nature, such that the employee may carry current knowledge of proposals or designs to a competitor. This is what happened to me when I left my position.

The employer may also not want the morale issue of having a terminal employee discussing the benefits of leaving with all the other employees.

There are many other reasons, but the whole point of "notice" is supposed to be courtesy and should be applied as deserved in my opinion.

Diesel McBadass
11-25-2012, 07:56
I may add my perspective is not higher levels of work, its not companies with proposals and such. Ive been a cashier a cookand a delivery driver at various places.

All i know, is being unemployed with no money sucks, id ratherdeal with a job i didnt like until i found a new one

chadster1
11-25-2012, 08:16
I quit a company with no notice one time. A two week notice is a courtesy that only benefits the employer. The main reason that this company was not due that courtesy was that a couple of months prior to quitting when I needed time off to attend a funeral, I was told that I had bad timing. I told that manager that I would have my family consult him in the future regarding the scheduling of funerals. I had worked for that company for almost 9 years.

I came in on a Friday morning, turned in my expense reports, made my deposits, cut my company credit card in half. I filled out my own exit interview along with a letter detailing my reasons for not giving notice and faxed it to every department in the corporate office.

About a month after I walked out of that job, I signed my franchise contract with Snap-on. Best decision I ever made.

handyman
11-25-2012, 08:29
Now, i have seen quite a few people quit jobs ive worked at or jobs friends have. Many people quit on the spot, alk out during a shift, etc. Almost none give a notice. A 2 weeks notice is a courtesy i would give.

What i cant understand though, is these people almost never have another job lined up. They aren't quitting to start a new job. they are just quitting because they dont like where there at and apparently would rather make no money and be broke?

What am i missing here?

Every ones handles stress ect different, some times its not about the money.

Diesel McBadass
11-25-2012, 08:50
I also want to add 2 weeks notice doesn't ONLY benefit employer. When employees quit where i work you end up shortstaffed through that scedule. You work days and hours you werent expecting to and productivity goes down. It sucks for other employees.

Giving a notice (we just had a guy do that, first ive seen in a year) gives time to make better scedules and start looking for new hires. 2 weeks notice benefits everyone, when you company only hires 13 people.

G-19
11-25-2012, 09:01
I walked out in the middle of a shift at a plastic extruding company I worked for after I got out of the Air Force. The place sucked, 12 hour three on - three off rotating shifts. No lunch break, you ate when and if your line permitted. The foreman was always bulling, cussing, and threatening people. He threatened to fire me because I leaned on a box about hour 8 of my 2 day of mandated OT, no sitting was allowed.

One day I got an "emergency" phone call from my mother telling me that a job I had applied for had called with a start date. I walked back to my line, hit the emergency stop button on the extruder and walked out. The screaming and *****ing of the foreman was music to my ears. Cost the company many hours of down time on that machine.

Been at that new job for 24 years.

Davegrave
11-25-2012, 09:03
You either pick very bad places to work many times over by accident or have a long history as a vindictive employee.

I tend to like Ray, but that's the fist thing that popped in my head too. :rofl:
Reminds me of Jim Jeffries standup routine.
"You ever meet a woman who's complaining that all 4 of her husbands beat her? All 4? Really? One, two, three, four? Well it sounds like someone doesn't know when to shut her mouth.
I'll give you sympathy on 3 and chalk it up to bad luck. But 4? Well....someones a button pusher!"

But back to the subject at hand, I'm sad I've never done it. I have a child and bills and there's no way I could take that risk. If my boss started molesting me I'd have to stay and take it till I could find another job. I have no choice. But I'd love to be free enough, safe enough to just say "go to hell, this ain't worth it" and walk out and never look back.
I wish I had when I was younger just so I could have felt it. I've seen more than my fair share, both as a coworker and a manager. I've never been mad about it. Don't get me wrong, I've been put in a bad spot by it and had some rough days making up the work, but as the guy walked away I always felt a little twinge of unabashed respect mixed in with my disappointment.





One day I got an "emergency" phone call from my mother telling me that a job I had applied for had called with a start date. I walked back to my line, hit the emergency stop button on the extruder and walked out. The screaming and *****ing of the foreman was music to my ears. Cost the company many hours of down time on that machine.

Been at that new job for 24 years.
:notworthy::notworthy::highfive:

ClydeG19
11-25-2012, 10:42
When I leave a job, I go out like the action hero quitting his corrupt govt agency at the end of a movie. I toss my badge on the desk of the supervisor, whip out a snappy one liner, take the girl around the waist and walk off into the sunset, thoroughly content with my new unemployment. I don't even wait for security to escort me out. :rock:

vart
11-25-2012, 12:41
I walked out on one job, and that was a union job over 20 years ago.

I was working for Maytag in Newton, IA and I had started out in sheetmetal, inspecting washer tubs for defects and grinding the defects off. They start every new hire out in sheetmetal; it was like bootcamp for the factory. Noisy, hard work, hot, miserable. After 3 months doing that, I was promoted to Quality Assurance, the best job in the factory.

However, I made the mistake back then of letting people know I was a conservative republican. Once you get labeled a republican in a union factory, you either get promoted to management as fast as you can, or your life is made hell by the union thugs.

After 2 years there, work had slowed down and the union said employees in my department could either take a voluntary lay off for a month or two and receive unemplyoment and union benefits which equaled about $50 less a week than full-time pay, or you could take a demotion to sheetmetal.

I submitted my request for the voluntary lay-off and had lined up some part-time work painting for a friend.

A week later, my union boss told me that I would be going back to sheetmetal. When I told him that I had submitted a request for the lay-offs, he just smiled and said that there must have been a mix-up.

I went back to sheetmetal and got the worst job in the factory; pulling 5-20 lb parts off the line and reaching up and hanging them on hooks for the paint booth. It was incredibly fast and exhausting; imagine suddenly using those muscles that you hadn't used much before. By lunch, I couldn't hardly lift my arms.

I got the message; either support the union or they will make life hell. I walked out at lunch and have never regretted it.

SevenSixtyTwo
11-25-2012, 12:55
I walked out on one job, and that was a union job over 20 years ago.

I was working for Maytag in Newton, IA and I had started out in sheetmetal, inspecting washer tubs for defects and grinding the defects off. They start every new hire out in sheetmetal; it was like bootcamp for the factory. Noisy, hard work, hot, miserable. After 3 months doing that, I was promoted to Quality Assurance, the best job in the factory.

However, I made the mistake back then of letting people know I was a conservative republican. Once you get labeled a republican in a union factory, you either get promoted to management as fast as you can, or your life is made hell by the union thugs.

After 2 years there, work had slowed down and the union said employees in my department could either take a voluntary lay off for a month or two and receive unemplyoment and union benefits which equaled about $50 less a week than full-time pay, or you could take a demotion to sheetmetal.

I submitted my request for the voluntary lay-off and had lined up some part-time work painting for a friend.

A week later, my union boss told me that I would be going back to sheetmetal. When I told him that I had submitted a request for the lay-offs, he just smiled and said that there must have been a mix-up.

I went back to sheetmetal and got the worst job in the factory; pulling 5-20 lb parts off the line and reaching up and hanging them on hooks for the paint booth. It was incredibly fast and exhausting; imagine suddenly using those muscles that you hadn't used much before. By lunch, I couldn't hardly lift my arms.

I got the message; either support the union or they will make life hell. I walked out at lunch and have never regretted it.

Would it have been any easier if you were a liberal Democrat? 30~% of our local membership is Republican. We all work hard every day for our pay. What is a union boss? My boss is with the company in a management position. If anything, your boss would have favored you over the pro union Democrats. I think you found out the hard way that the stories of five guys standing around watching one work is BS.:supergrin:
BTW, Thanks for the good work. Our Maytag W&D have been working great for years!

vart
11-25-2012, 13:13
I think you found out the hard way that the stories of five guys standing around watching one work is BS.:supergrin:
BTW, Thanks for the good work. Our Maytag W&D have been working great for years!

I actually helped build the Maytag washer I have in my house and it has been perfect for 20 years...:supergrin:

No, I never saw 5 guys standing around while one works. I did see guys come to work drunk and not get in trouble. I did see guys sexually harass females and not get in trouble. I was pressured to vote democratic and I know I got stuck back in sheetmetal for daring to admit I was a republican.(Iowa is a blue state anyways)

Most of the workers were good people and worked hard and deserved the wages they got. Some were worthless and the union kept them employed.

Averageman
11-25-2012, 15:36
I recently worked with a guy that is a total PITA. Now normally I just avoid folks like that and pity them for being a miserable unhappy soul, but unfortunatly I could not avoid this one.
Would I quit? No, perhaps not, but taking the issue up higher along with many other co-workers seemed to have no effect. The odd thing is everyone agreed that this guy is a jerk and there was little they could/would do about it.
I love my job, but if I had to work for fifteen more minutes with that guy, we would have had an issue.
I can see that if I was young and didn't have nine years with the company I might have walked off the job without notice rather than listen to him gripe, moan and complain and make inapporpriate threats against fellow employee's, especially when management knows it is an issue and can't or wont do anything about it.

michael e
11-25-2012, 16:03
I walked out of a second job. Was just working to pay off some stuff when I was younger. We agreeded to part time, that turned to 45 hours a week, on top of my 50 hours at main job. After 4 weeks of this, no days off, I told PT job we needed to talk about my PT. Manager said nothing we can do we need you, told him I was done.

Walk Soft
11-25-2012, 16:25
I grew up poor,left home at 17.I've never used unemployment.In my twenties I walked off of a few jobs.I'm the kind of guy who never misses work and work is always a competition for me.I'm not happy unless I'm out performing others in the same or similar job enough for people to notice.There have been times I was in an integral position and under appreciated or underpaid. It's an awesome feeling to say @*%! you guys,I'm going home.
Now that I'm in my thirties I think more before I act.Actually I run a business which was one of the ones I quit.The owner of this business tracked me down,contacted me at the job I was at and made several offers before I accepted the position.I did give two weeks notice when I left that job for this one.I'll give notice when and if I leave the current one because I'm well compensated and appreciated.

sappy13
11-25-2012, 19:02
iv never understood it either. just doesnt make since to quit any job without having another lined up. Most people that do that just dont think ahead.

RayB
11-25-2012, 20:17
A) You either pick very bad places to work many times over by accident

B) or have a long history as a vindictive employee.


A) Professional sales is often a dicey proposition... You can do well for years, and they'll promote and insert an idiot into a key position, and everything tanks.

I've also seen OEMs make critical engineering or merchandising errors, that destroyed years of careful, hard work.

And I’ve had union strikes leave me with no goods to ship, rendering all my previous good work, pointless.

I'm fifty-seven, and I got into sales for a major OEM in 1979, a time when career salespeople with long-term employers were starting to go extinct... Prior to this, putting in twenty years with a company was a doable thing... I got in at a bad time, though this wasn’t immediately evident...

B) Vindictive? In fact, I'm superlatively fair. And easy to understand. With me, you can expect to get back what you give. How simple is that?

But I'm notoriously difficult to intimidate, and not often wrong, since I choose my battles carefully.

What's more, for the last couple of decades, I've owned my homes free and clear, and everything else I call mine, and I had income from rental property and other investments...

Today, I'm semiretired at 57, and take only those jobs I'm interested in doing.

--Ray

Huaco Kid
11-25-2012, 20:34
The company that I am currently working for used to give an employee a 2 week notice that the company was letting them go. Then management would go around the plant to let us other employees know what was happening.

They don’t do this any longer.

I worked for a very large government defense contractor.

One day, the fire alarm went off. 500 people went out to the parking lots and assembled in their assigned meeting places. After a while, they told us it was ok to go back in, except...

We had to use the front door and use our access cards to get in, one at a time.

If your card didn't work you had to go stand over there...

They escorted those people (like, 50 of them) in, one at a time to retrieve their personal belongings.

I never felt the same about the company after that (no, I didn't get laid-off) and most definitely never trusted the management after that.

RayB
11-25-2012, 20:42
I tend to like Ray, but that's the fist thing that popped in my head too. :rofl:



Feel the love... :hearts:

:wavey:

--Ray

RayB
11-25-2012, 20:44
I walked out in the middle of a shift at a plastic extruding company I worked for after I got out of the Air Force. The place sucked, 12 hour three on - three off rotating shifts. No lunch break, you ate when and if your line permitted. The foreman was always bulling, cussing, and threatening people. He threatened to fire me because I leaned on a box about hour 8 of my 2 day of mandated OT, no sitting was allowed.

One day I got an "emergency" phone call from my mother telling me that a job I had applied for had called with a start date. I walked back to my line, hit the emergency stop button on the extruder and walked out. The screaming and *****ing of the foreman was music to my ears. Cost the company many hours of down time on that machine.

Been at that new job for 24 years.


That's the most beautiful thing I've read in a long, long time! :crying:

Nicely done, sir! :thumbsup:

--Ray

gjk5
11-25-2012, 20:45
these kind of threads always remind me how juvenile grown men can be.

RayB
11-25-2012, 20:55
You either pick very bad places to work many times over by accident or have a long history as a vindictive employee.


I didn't even tell you about the time I lawyered up and sued my employer through Worker's Comp, and kicked his abusive *****! :supergrin:

Here too, this guy was never happy unless he was dumping all over someone... :steamed:

They had to pay all my medical bills, including surgery and weeks of PT, plus lost income and damages... :therapy:

Vindictive? Not really... :shakehead:

But arguably unlucky! :freak:

--Ray

P.S. "Ass!" with dollar $$ signs is censored? :shocked:

RayB
11-25-2012, 21:01
these kind of threads always remind me how juvenile grown men can be.


In particular since the greater balance of threads are sooo mature... :upeyes:

--Ray

DanaT
11-26-2012, 04:47
I didn't even tell you about the time I lawyered up and sued my employer through Worker's Comp, and kicked his abusive *****! :supergrin:

Here too, this guy was never happy unless he was dumping all over someone... :steamed:

They had to pay all my medical bills, including surgery and weeks of PT, plus lost income and damages... :therapy:

Vindictive? Not really... :shakehead:

But arguably unlucky! :freak:

--Ray

P.S. "Ass!" with dollar $$ signs is censored? :shocked:

You are semi retired, so it doesnt affect you.

BUT, when you walk off the job, you are generally not eligible for re-hire. Also, any workers comp claim can be found and any legal action against an employer can be found. Background checks often find all of these things.

Personally, I wouldnt hire someone who sued their previous employer. If I have two previous employers tell me you are not eligible for re-hire, I probably will not hire you.

Everyone now-a-days needs to keep in mind how easy information is to find on someone. A good background check can save a company a lot of money down the road.

walt cowan
11-26-2012, 06:36
Now, i have seen quite a few people quit jobs ive worked at or jobs friends have. Many people quit on the spot, alk out during a shift, etc. Almost none give a notice. A 2 weeks notice is a courtesy i would give.

What i cant understand though, is these people almost never have another job lined up. They aren't quitting to start a new job. they are just quitting because they dont like where there at and apparently would rather make no money and be broke?

What am i missing here?

does anyone give a two week notice before they fire you?:whistling:

Travelin' Jack
11-26-2012, 06:41
does anyone give a two week notice before they fire you?:whistling:

The only job I ever lost, I was laid off from. I was given about ten weeks notice for that.

SevenSixtyTwo
11-26-2012, 07:26
The last technician that was fired from our company got no notice at all. Union BA said you violated company policy, nothing we can do. Case closed. Why should there be any loyalty the other way other than future consequences with future employers.

series1811
11-26-2012, 07:39
It's much funner to quit a bad job when you already taken a better one. :supergrin:

jason10mm
11-26-2012, 07:45
The two week notice is entirely a courtesy. As management, I expect it from folks who are moving on to other jobs (it happens, especially in military connected gov't work). It is a way to preserve your relationship with the employer. A discontented worker quitting, well of course they would not want to preserve that relationship thus an on the spot departure is acceptible to them. They probably wouldn't be considered favorably in the eyes of mangement anyway. Of course these days a prior reference is almost worthless, lots of places will only have a HR person confirm dates of employment, so the opinion of your previous sup is irrelevent unless there is a back door conversation.

Jon_R
11-26-2012, 08:15
Just depends. I can get bye for a while without a paycheck and I have a lot of education and skills in things people want in the current job market and am cleared. (BS Engineering, Computer Security, MS Digital Forensics, Cisco, Unix, etc..) I would expect I could get a comparable job fairly quickly but try and prepare that it would take a while.

I also lead a IT group and there are situations that are feasible where I could be given an order to do something that I find so wrong on moral and ethical grounds that I would decline and tender my resignation and would be willing to leave immediately. Also once I go I will not come back, or answer questions, or help out the guys, etc.

I generally follow a traditional military style. There are 3 people in the company that are in my chain of command (CIO, President, and Owner). If they clearly order me to do something I either carry it out or I will resign. If they ask my opinion on the matter I will provide it. It is their company and I will support them to the best of my ability but somethings I just won't do so I will let them replace me with someone that will do what it is they think they need done.

I have been there 13 years so working out so far.

Now, i have seen quite a few people quit jobs ive worked at or jobs friends have. Many people quit on the spot, alk out during a shift, etc. Almost none give a notice. A 2 weeks notice is a courtesy i would give.

What i cant understand though, is these people almost never have another job lined up. They aren't quitting to start a new job. they are just quitting because they dont like where there at and apparently would rather make no money and be broke?

What am i missing here?

RayB
11-26-2012, 12:42
1) You are semi retired, so it doesnt affect you.

2) BUT, when you walk off the job, you are generally not eligible for re-hire. Also, any workers comp claim can be found and any legal action against an employer can be found. Background checks often find all of these things.

3) Personally, I wouldnt hire someone who sued their previous employer. If I have two previous employers tell me you are not eligible for re-hire, I probably will not hire you.

4) Everyone now-a-days needs to keep in mind how easy information is to find on someone. A good background check can save a company a lot of money down the road.


1 & 2) No, but it did at the time. I offered a full explanation in an amplified resume, including a copy of the Administrative Law Judge's opinion that the employer had been negligent, and was at fault for my injury. This makes the employer look bad, and not me. But if you hold employers in the highest esteem, and regard employees as lower forms of life, you would no doubt circular file my application and in the long run, do us both a favor.

3) If your intentions are sincere, the fact that I sued another employer and won should not trouble you. If it does, then you're probably intimidated by me, or by the prospect of an employee that will tell you where the bear sits, if it becomes necessary.

4) As with the UCB claims that found the employer at fault, and sided with me. Those prospective employers that would tend to want to crap on me in the same way, if doing so became expedient, would definitely think twice before bringing me on board.

Keep in mind that when the rubber hit the road, I delivered, and usually beyond expectations. Nobody ever had to tell me to work harder, work smarter, or keep accurate paperwork, since I tend to be meticulous about those things. My customers invariably respected me, and many genuinely liked me; go figure. I go all out for my customers... To this day I get weekly email from ex-customers, one ex-employer, and two ex-secretaries. In fact, I met my present wife at one of these jobs...

I never held a sales position where they didn't end up offering me a promotion. If results mattered, I was your man. If petty politics and ass kissing was your thing, you would quickly grow to dislike me, because I have little patience and less time for that crap.

Again, professional sales in the big leagues can be really cut throat... Through the 80’s and 90’s the average stint for an aggressive salesperson with any given employer in a given position, was four years... While I ended up doing okay with a life of career sales, I do not recommend it to young people as a career choice in today’s business climate.

--Ray

RPVG
11-26-2012, 13:13
"... If your intentions are sincere, the fact that I sued another employer and won should not trouble you..."
As a hiring manager, if I have three applicants to choose from, and one had sued a previous employer, I'd be down to two.

Why bother with someone who "may" turn out to be a "professional victim"? (I've seen plenty of those in my time.) Or an on-the-job "lawyer". (Seem plenty of those, too.) Much easier to steer clear of potential troublemakers.

427
11-26-2012, 13:33
In the car business, it's not uncommon to have people quit without notice or a job lined up. It used to be that one could quit in the morning, and have a new job after lunch.

People move around and a person staying in a general location long enough where everybody knows (of) everybody, it's not generally frowned upon. In that business, as much as people gossip, there really aren't secrets.

sciolist
11-26-2012, 13:33
Now, i have seen quite a few people quit jobs ive worked at or jobs friends have. Many people quit on the spot, alk out during a shift, etc. Almost none give a notice. A 2 weeks notice is a courtesy i would give.

What i cant understand though, is these people almost never have another job lined up. They aren't quitting to start a new job. they are just quitting because they dont like where there at and apparently would rather make no money and be broke?

What am i missing here?


Maybe they want to take some time off from work. What's wrong with that? I’ve taken a few years off work without having anything else vocational lined up.

DanaT
11-26-2012, 13:37
As a hiring manager, if I have three applicants to choose from, and one had sued a previous employer, I'd be down to two.

Why bother with someone who "may" turn out to be a "professional victim"? (I've seen plenty of those in my time.) Or an on-the-job "lawyer". (Seem plenty of those, too.) Much easier to steer clear of potential troublemakers.

We tend to think alike.

I dont want to be the next employer in a pattern.

Spiffums
11-26-2012, 14:11
Right to work...........if you can fire them on the spot they can quit on the spot with no notice.

RPVG
11-26-2012, 14:53
We tend to think alike.

I dont want to be the next employer in a pattern.

For me, it wouldn't even have to be a pattern. I look for signs of a "potential" troublemaker when hiring. A good track record is important for a candidate, but I think everyone has a "nuisance" factor, too. Everyone. (Well... except you and me, of course. :cool:)

It's just not worth trying to deal with people who have an "attitude". There are too many other qualified applicants out there.

Unfortunately, a disproportionate number of lawsuits are brought by people with an "attitude". Fairly or not, I tend to lump them together when hiring.

Kingarthurhk
11-26-2012, 15:10
Probably giddy to be paid for 2.5 years to sit around the house or entertain hobbies.

smokin762
11-26-2012, 15:34
I worked for a very large government defense contractor.

One day, the fire alarm went off. 500 people went out to the parking lots and assembled in their assigned meeting places. After a while, they told us it was ok to go back in, except...

We had to use the front door and use our access cards to get in, one at a time.

If your card didn't work you had to go stand over there...

They escorted those people (like, 50 of them) in, one at a time to retrieve their personal belongings.

I never felt the same about the company after that (no, I didn't get laid-off) and most definitely never trusted the management after that.

The company I work for is European owned. About 8 years ago, they bought out one of their competitors. Our company bought them because they wanted the competitor’s distribution system. They had warehouses all across the US and Canada.

As time went on, our company moved its headquarters to the headquarters of the other company. It was a much larger building with a larger office space. Little by little, they started telling office workers at our plant, that their position was being eliminated at our location and being moved to the new headquarters. If they wanted to keep their jobs, they would need to relocate. Many people did just that. Within a few months on a Sunday evening, they all got a call to come in for a meeting. Every one of them was terminated. The remainder of the officer workers that was told they need to relocate quit.

Now some of the people say if they are ever asked to relocate, they know it is time to look for a new job.

smokeross
11-26-2012, 17:05
I usually punch the boss in the neck, or kick him in the ***** when I quit without notice. Then as a bonus move, I toss a lit match in every trash can on my way to the door. But I am smiling as I do it. I'm a happy quiter.

Diesel McBadass
11-26-2012, 20:53
I wont quit without having another job lined up because i couldn't afford it, with the economy in the dump as much as it is even low skilled jobs are hard to get.

RayB
11-27-2012, 10:19
1) As a hiring manager, if I have three applicants to choose from, and one had sued a previous employer, I'd be down to two.

2) Why bother with someone who "may" turn out to be a "professional victim"? (I've seen plenty of those in my time.) Or an on-the-job "lawyer". (Seem plenty of those, too.) Much easier to steer clear of potential troublemakers.


1) I suspect you and I hire on different criterion... As a hiring manager (which I was) in my particular arena at that time, I would size the person up as to whether or not I thought he or she could take the bull by the horns and...

A) Overcome objections and close sales!

B) Analyze an ailing 10-county territory and fix it!

C) Analyze a competitor's activity and effectively counter it!

D) Recognize a dealer's potential and maximize it!

E) Cold call, prospect, and open viable new accounts!

F) Manage a co-op advertising budget and account for it!

G) Create and execute wholesale-retail promotions!

H) Execute factory sponsored national promotions

I) Collect past-due accounts!

J) Absolutely dominate your market!

K) Represent the OEM in a way that makes us proud!

L) Make each and every month!

And do all of the above primarily on commission, with minimal supervision and assistance, and vast amounts of autonomy... People that could actually do this in a cold, cruel world, month after month, tended to be those high-powered individuals that make many people uncomfortable.

You don't put a race horse in a plow horse's harness...

2) Why? Because they come off like they can actually do a job that most people fall on their asses attempting to do. So, there's that... :dunno:

Wait till you meet the upper management—the real movers and the shakers! Those guys are really intense! :shocked:

I think you and I are from two different worlds. :wavey:

I was admittedly, absurdly overqualified for many of the latter jobs I was offered and accepted, much to the chagrin of some HR managers that were used to shuffling office and warehouse staff about... But times were changing, and I eventually had to accept that. I actually used to refer to myself as one of the last of the T-Rex's... :fred:

By the bye, in the last trade shows I worked, many previous contacts would stop by to shake hands and say hello... And I still get almost daily email from a few customers, associates, and even a prior employer or two... :cool:

--Ray

DanaT
11-27-2012, 14:34
Wait till you meet the upper management—the real movers and the shakers! Those guys are really intense! :shocked:

What should I do when I meet the CEO? I would think having a beer would be good. What do you think.

ron59
11-27-2012, 15:49
Now, i have seen quite a few people quit jobs ive worked at or jobs friends have. Many people quit on the spot, alk out during a shift, etc. Almost none give a notice. A 2 weeks notice is a courtesy i would give.

What i cant understand though, is these people almost never have another job lined up. They aren't quitting to start a new job. they are just quitting because they dont like where there at and apparently would rather make no money and be broke?

What am i missing here?


It's pretty crazy to quit without another job, that's for sure.

Having said that.... I did it last year. I'm a computer programmer, had taken a new job and only been there for 4 months maybe. Small company, the one owner was a COMPLETE jackass. Too long of a story to go into, but he questioned something I did like I was an idiot, had done it once before (in front of others). My fist was balled I was so mad at him. I realize it sounds like I over-reacted, but I'd need WAY too much text to explain all the details.

Anyway, out the door. Had another job in a week.
Many professions don't have that luxury, but he made me so mad I couldn't think straight. And realize... that was the first job I had just QUIT, ever (I'm in my early 50's).

RayB
11-29-2012, 21:28
What should I do when I meet the CEO? I would think having a beer would be good. What do you think.


The usual standard in the office is coffee or water... :dunno:

Clearly, you enjoy a more laid back work environment! :freak:

--Ray