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jdavionic
11-25-2012, 12:18
I've previously posted about driving my daughter's older Honda Accord that has 190k miles down to her college ~500 miles. All was fine.

Now with winter break approaching, I'm wondering whether it makes more sense just to leave it down there over the break.

If I did that, the car would sit for exactly 4 weeks. The other option is to drive down in another vehicle, follow her up, she'd drive it over the break, then follow her back down at the end of the break. She really doesn't need the car over the break.

If I leave it down there, I could either put in a storage unit or leave it outside. The car is currently in Central FL.

So with all that, what would you recommend - drive it up or store it down there for 4 weeks?

If I store it, I'm thinking that I ought to -
- fill the tank up with premium gas?
- over inflate the tires by ~ 5 psi?
- disconnect the battery?
- rent a storage unit to keep it in versus leaving it outside

I don't know if all of that is required for 4 weeks or not.

What would you recommend?

Thanks for your help.

BlownFiveLiter
11-25-2012, 12:20
I would leave it exactly as it is. The battery should be able to hold a charge for a month.

JDennis
11-25-2012, 12:22
For a month, dont worry about the gas. Make sure tires are filled, disconnect the battery.

vart
11-25-2012, 12:23
My suburban sits for a month at a time without being driven and it fires right up every time; no need to do anything special.

Now, if it was for a year or so, then there are things you should do...

jdavionic
11-25-2012, 12:29
I would leave it exactly as it is. The battery should be able to hold a charge for a month.

I thought about getting a battery maintainer/tender. But I could almost by a replacement battery for the money...and then I wouldn't have to worry about where to plug it & keeping the hood popped over.

Leaving the battery connected has the advantage of keeping the alarm armed.

CitizenOfDreams
11-25-2012, 12:40
A properly working modern car should start right up after sitting idle for a month. Even the battery should keep enough charge without disconnecting it, unless the car has an unusually high drain current.

Dan_ntx
11-25-2012, 12:41
Don't disconnect anything... A month is not long enough to worry about anything draining or going flat.

jdavionic
11-25-2012, 12:46
No need to rent a storage unit?

JMS
11-25-2012, 12:49
Buy a club for it and leave it be.

Dan_ntx
11-25-2012, 12:52
No need to rent a storage unit?

Not for the cars sake... If the area is high crime or you have other non automotive concerns that is a different story.

Full disclosure, I've been in the car business for years and buy for a lot that has 900+ cars on the ground at any given time. We routinely have cars waiting on parts or in our repo section that sit for multiple months with no preperation or special considerations. I had a Lincoln Navigator that was reported stolen in Mexico (ins fraud) that sat for 6 months while we got that mess worked out...turned the key and it fired up no problem. Unless something is draining the battery, a month or two is no problem at all. Worst case you jump start it.

ray9898
11-25-2012, 12:52
It's only a month, no need to do anything. My hunting/fishing/camping vehicle sits that long several times a year and fires right up.

427
11-25-2012, 13:10
As others have said, if the car is sitting for a month you don't have to do anything special.

When you go back check all the fluids and tire pressure, though.

captainstormy
11-25-2012, 13:36
You seriously worry to much about this car. Also, why are you driving down to your daughter?

Just have her drive it up, let it sit unused during the break and drive it back down. She's a big girl.

While its up there it would give you a chance to do any maintenance you wanted as well.

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2

wrczx3
11-25-2012, 13:44
Put car in park,roll up windows,remove keys from ignition,lock the doors and walk away.

jdavionic
11-25-2012, 13:45
You seriously worry to much about this car. Also, why are you driving down to your daughter?

Just have her drive it up, let it sit unused during the break and drive it back down. She's a big girl.

While its up there it would give you a chance to do any maintenance you wanted as well.

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2

You're probably right that I worry too much. There is no outstanding maintenance that I need to do on the vehicle. It has been well maintained over the life the vehicle and had the service required before bringing it down there...including 4 new tires.

We are going to get a low mileage used vehicle for her next year. This car will be used locally by my other daughter. In the meantime, there's no way I'm comfortable letting her drive by herself up here. Yes, we've got AAA and she has a cell phone. But stuff happens. Call me an over-protective Dad.

Paul_J
11-25-2012, 15:57
If it did need service this would be a great time for a shop to store......opps, I meant perform the service for you. :whistling:

I'm also an over protective dad who has a daughter that drives between Houston and Dallas to attend school. It's only 4.5 hours but I don't rest until I get the message she is at her dorm.

PBR Sailor
11-25-2012, 16:07
Make sure the gas tank is full and the tires are properly inflated before you park it. Throw a dryer sheet under the seat and one in the trunk to keep out the musty smell if it is humid where you are going to park it. Lock the doors of course. Park it where you will not forget it's location and you be able to find it in a month.

aircarver
11-25-2012, 16:20
doors of course. Park it where you will not forget it's location and you be able to find it in a month.

Park it where it won't get towed ... :whistling:

.

jdavionic
11-25-2012, 17:38
Make sure the gas tank is full and the tires are properly inflated before you park it. Throw a dryer sheet under the seat and one in the trunk to keep out the musty smell if it is humid where you are going to park it. Lock the doors of course. Park it where you will not forget it's location and you be able to find it in a month.

Thanks. I would have never thought about the dryer sheet idea.

roger123
11-25-2012, 17:41
I'm in the Navy and have routinely let my car sit for 6 months at a time with no issues. The car will be fine for a month.

jdavionic
11-25-2012, 17:48
I'm in the Navy and have routinely let my car sit for 6 months at a time with no issues. The car will be fine for a month.

Wow...you didn't have to do anything to keep the battery charged enough?

jpa
11-25-2012, 18:29
Didn't she tell you? She's hitching a ride home with her biker ex-con boyfriend...they don't need to call when she gets home, you should hear his Harley from a couple blocks away...

Cooper
11-25-2012, 18:31
Let her drive it! It's only 500 miles, and she's surely driven more than that during the semester. She'll be fine . . . and if it breaks down, well . . . every college kid should have a nightmare breakdown experience. There are some things you have to learn the hard way.

jdavionic
11-25-2012, 18:43
Didn't she tell you? She's hitching a ride home with her biker ex-con boyfriend...they don't need to call when she gets home, you should hear his Harley from a couple blocks away...

Funny man...your day will come and you can count the gray hairs. I used to think having boys was worse than girls. However it's times like this where I'd just say - 'let 'em drive...he'll work it out if it doesn't make it'. That's a whole lot different when it's your daughter.

sputnik767
11-25-2012, 19:35
Dude, just leave it alone and don't worry about it. If you told me it would sit for a year, then sure, take some steps, but a month is nothing. My 2003 Tacoma stayed with my dad for a year when I just came to NYC. I asked him to drive it periodically, and 6 months later when I came to visit, the truck was in the exact place I left it. I asked him if he drove it and he told me that he never got around to it. The truck started right up. Then after I left, it sat for another 6 months until I decided to bring it up with me. No issues at all.

aircarver
11-25-2012, 19:39
Funny man...your day will come and you can count the gray hairs. I used to think having boys was worse than girls. However it's times like this where I'd just say - 'let 'em drive...he'll work it out if it doesn't make it'. That's a whole lot different when it's your daughter.

I got four dotters-

You got it easy .... :supergrin:

:rollingeyes:

.

jdavionic
11-25-2012, 19:43
I got four dotters-

You got it easy .... :supergrin:

:rollingeyes:

.

Geez, counting your wife...that's like playing Russian Roulette with 5 rounds in the revolver each month. :supergrin:

aircarver
11-25-2012, 19:47
Geez, counting your wife...that's like playing Russian Roulette with 5 rounds in the revolver each month. :supergrin:

...You do unnerstand .... exactly !!

:supergrin:

Example: Last week youngest (goes to college an hour away) got a flat & shredded the tire. Had a perfectly good spare. Had refused my offer to all the girlz to teach tire-changing 101. Wanted me to drive an hour (two ways) to change the tire ....

After sufficient foot dragging and actually starting out on the fool's errand, she got a samaritan to change the tire for her ...

Dotters .... :freak:


.

goldenlight
11-26-2012, 03:06
For a month, dont worry about the gas. Make sure tires are filled, disconnect the battery.

DON'T disconnect the battery: the car needs it to keep the engine management control computer settings.

Most cars will recover the setting when driven for awhile at freeway speeds.. but a few will not.

Then you have to take it to the Honda dealer to get the firmware reinstalled. It's very expensive.

Buy a set of jumper cables; every car should have a set in the trunk anyways.

Odds are you daughter won't need them. Four weeks in a mild climate should not drain a good battery, but if she does need them, she will have them.

Fill the tank all the way full with regular gasoline; there's no need to buy premium.

Overfilling the tires isn't a bad idea. In 4 weeks they shouldn't leak, but you never know. It's easier to let air out than take off a flat tire, and fill it up.

I anticipate no problems for this Honda Accord if you store it for 4 weeks.

Find a place to store it inside, if at all possible. People notice when I car doesn't move for a long time, and somebody may target a burglary on that information. Better safe than sorry.

Gallium
11-26-2012, 03:46
DON'T disconnect the battery: the car needs it to keep the engine management control computer settings....


What? 1st I ever heard this. I've had 1/2 doz EFI vehicles with batteries very dead or disconnected and never had any issues.

jdavionic
11-26-2012, 06:39
Find a place to store it inside, if at all possible. People notice when I car doesn't move for a long time, and somebody may target a burglary on that information. Better safe than sorry.

I called the school and they actually allow parking in the garage over the break, which has security. So that looks like a good option.



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M&P15T
11-26-2012, 07:53
In the meantime, there's no way I'm comfortable letting her drive by herself up here. Yes, we've got AAA and she has a cell phone. But stuff happens. Call me an over-protective Dad.

O.k., you're an over-protective Dad.

Seriously, stop helicopter-parenting. Let her grow up a bit.

jpa
11-26-2012, 16:11
...You do unnerstand .... exactly !!

:supergrin:

Example: Last week youngest (goes to college an hour away) got a flat & shredded the tire. Had a perfectly good spare. Had refused my offer to all the girlz to teach tire-changing 101. Wanted me to drive an hour (two ways) to change the tire ....

After sufficient foot dragging and actually starting out on the fool's errand, she got a samaritan to change the tire for her ...

Dotters .... :freak:


.

Don't worry about whether she got the tire changed. Worry about what she had to do to get the tire changed...:tongueout:

Sorry, I'm just kidding for the most part but I really feel for the overbearing parents in this thread who feel like it's a failure on their part as a parent that their child made a bad decision. It's part of growing up. We all make choices and we all have to live with the consequences. Your daughter refused to learn how to change a tire. Now she's stuck hoping a kind soul would come along and do it for her. Maybe next time she'll take you up on the offer to teach her something useful.

For the OP, I hope your blood pressure didn't rise too much over the biker boyfriend crack. I'm trying to make a point that you need to loosen up. Your daughter is just as capable as any man, anything you can do so can she, GI Jane, don't open her door for her blah blah and all that other feminazi bull crap. But seriously...she's a big girl and is going to have to eventually do stuff on her own. Let her worry about the car and know that she can call AAA just like you could if it won't start. As for protecting the car while she's gone, parking in the garage at school sounds like a novel idea. Is there any way to leave HER cell phone number and name with the campus security/police in case something happens to the car while it's parked there?

I like that term...helicopter parenting....

jdavionic
11-26-2012, 17:50
For the OP, I hope your blood pressure didn't rise too much over the biker boyfriend crack. I'm trying to make a point that you need to loosen up. Your daughter is just as capable as any man, anything you can do so can she, GI Jane, don't open her door for her blah blah and all that other feminazi bull crap. But seriously...she's a big girl and is going to have to eventually do stuff on her own. Let her worry about the car and know that she can call AAA just like you could if it won't start. As for protecting the car while she's gone, parking in the garage at school sounds like a novel idea. Is there any way to leave HER cell phone number and name with the campus security/police in case something happens to the car while it's parked there?

I like that term...helicopter parenting....

No, I've got a sense of humor. I have to with 3 women in the house.

aircarver
11-26-2012, 18:05
I like that term...helicopter parenting....

The schools actually use that term in 'parent orientation' of new students, replete with glaring examples ....

It doesn't always take so they get more glaring horrible examples each year ... :whistling:

(I've been to a lot of 'parent orientations' .... :rollingeyes:

.

Roger1079
11-26-2012, 19:00
I've previously posted about driving my daughter's older Honda Accord that has 190k miles down to her college ~500 miles. All was fine.

Now with winter break approaching, I'm wondering whether it makes more sense just to leave it down there over the break.

If I did that, the car would sit for exactly 4 weeks. The other option is to drive down in another vehicle, follow her up, she'd drive it over the break, then follow her back down at the end of the break. She really doesn't need the car over the break.

If I leave it down there, I could either put in a storage unit or leave it outside. The car is currently in Central FL.

So with all that, what would you recommend - drive it up or store it down there for 4 weeks?

If I store it, I'm thinking that I ought to -
- fill the tank up with premium gas?
- over inflate the tires by ~ 5 psi?
- disconnect the battery?
- rent a storage unit to keep it in versus leaving it outside

I don't know if all of that is required for 4 weeks or not.

What would you recommend?

Thanks for your help.Lock it and leave it. The car will be fine as is sitting for 4 weeks.

Roger1079
11-26-2012, 19:07
What? 1st I ever heard this. I've had 1/2 doz EFI vehicles with batteries very dead or disconnected and never had any issues.The only thing that can be lost are the variable changes that the computer learns based on air charge temperature, driving style, etc. All newer EFI cars learn based on driver and climate to maximize fuel economy and driveability. The longer the car is driven, the more it will adapt.

I am oversimplifying this system, but you get the jist I'm sure. Truth be told, after changing a battery these changes are so minor that you likely will never notice that they have been lost and need to be relearned. I am assuming this is what the poster was talking about.

DoubleWide
11-26-2012, 19:12
Tell her to drive it home.

Get her to text/call before she leaves and update when she stops.

yodahunter
11-26-2012, 19:24
I am approaching 300k miles and I drive 4 hrs at a time and feel more confident with my vehicle than others. If the Honda is a hangar queen then I understand but with care it will be fine.


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jdavionic
01-06-2013, 15:32
Well, I just thought I'd follow up on this one. I left the car for 4 weeks. Upon returning, I found the battery was dead. I removed the old one, which was 4 yrs old. Not too old, but not new either. Rather than jump it back to life, I just decided to replace it.

Put the new one in and it started right up. No warning (aka, idiot) lights. I let it idle for a bit while I dug for the radio code. Then I took it out for a drive and all went well. Checked all the fluids...everything looked fine.

So that was it. Not too exciting, but I figured I'd share in case someone else considered the same type of decision later on.

Thanks for those that posted to help out.

jakebrake
01-06-2013, 15:33
For a month, dont worry about the gas. Make sure tires are filled, disconnect the battery.

yup. pull negative terminal, and call it a day.

sputnik767
01-06-2013, 16:37
yup. pull negative terminal, and call it a day.

If I was storing the car for 4 years, sure, but for 4 weeks, lock the doors and walk away. My car would sit for 5 months at a time last year with no issues.