Anyone ever have a large safe stolen from them? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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KennyFSU
11-26-2012, 10:49
Or has heard of this happening to anyone? I'm going to assume they weren't bolted down but is this a common occurrence during home burglaries?

ScottieG59
11-26-2012, 11:13
The typical burglar quickly runs to the master bedroom and grabs what he can carry. Even this is rare in many places. Normally, even a 100 pound safe is too much to take.

Safe can be and have been targets during home invasions.

Very large safes are usually left alone even if not bolted down. Some thieves will try to tip a safe over and try to pry it open, if they have large crowbars, or if you left some appropriate tools out. Others will try to punch the lock out. These efforts are defeated by the better safes.

Professional criminals will defeat the safe with enough time. There are not many thieves with professional level skills

KennyFSU
11-26-2012, 11:19
The typical burglar quickly runs to the master bedroom and grabs what he can carry. Even this is rare in many places. Normally, even a 100 pound safe is too much to take.

Safe can be and have been targets during home invasions.

Very large safes are usually left alone even if not bolted down. Some thieves will try to tip a safe over and try to pry it open, if they have large crowbars, or if you left some appropriate tools out. Others will try to punch the lock out. These efforts are defeated by the better safes.

Professional criminals will defeat the safe with enough time. There are not many thieves with professional level skills

Good response, I believe that to be the case as well. I doubt the average random burglar would even attempt to break into a safe since many burglaries last a few seconds and are "smash and grab" jobs.

I am just curious to see if it has ever happened to anyone and what precaution were taken afterwards.

ditto1958
11-26-2012, 11:32
Years ago it happened to my father-in-law. He was moving to another part of the state, and had a large safe in one of the new barns on his new farm. Someone loaded up the safe onto a vehicle, took it to another location, and carcked it open. The police later recovered it, but not the contents.

PBR Sailor
11-26-2012, 11:41
The safe was on the first floor of a neighbor's house. It was not bolted down. The neighbor was on vacation and the burglars wheeled the safe out of the house. The hallway they moved the safe down had a night light plugged into an outlet that the homeowner had to remove so there would be enough room to move the safe past the outlet. At least the burglars were kind enough to plug the night light back in after they moved the safe.

Mushinto
11-26-2012, 11:46
In over 30 years of law enforcement, I've never seen it.

The old saying is that you don't have to bolt down your safe until after your first burglary.

I have two 30" safes because 30" is the widest I can physically get into my house. They are bolted together, so if they can get it out, they deserve it.

SC Tiger
11-26-2012, 12:21
I have heard of one being ripped out through a window (presumably with a winch) and then (presumably) loaded in a truck with the same winch. It would have to be somewhere where neighbors can't see you though.

smokeross
11-26-2012, 12:27
Doubt that many burglars show up at the scene with a fork lift and flat bed truck.

Bren
11-26-2012, 12:42
Or has heard of this happening to anyone? I'm going to assume they weren't bolted down but is this a common occurrence during home burglaries?

The first burglary case I ever worked, a doctor had a medium sized safe stolen from his office. I still remember it well:

They managed to use the alarm code to shut off the alarm. :whistling:

It had his "very valuable coin collection" inside. :whistling:

He needed a report for the insurance, but I didn't get to ask him the details because he was on a plane to Las Vegas, so I discussed it with his brother. :whistling:
Apparently the insurance gave them some trouble about waiting to see if it could be recovered, so the same brother showed up a few weeks later with the empty safe that he just happened to "spot down over the river bank in another part of the county as he was driving by.":upeyes:

It wasn't bolted down.

Psychman
11-26-2012, 12:46
Gravity would be a huge hurdle to jump over for someone to get my safe out of my house.

Fear Night
11-26-2012, 12:54
Depends how big and how heavy. Also, was placing the safe a straight shot or did it take careful navigation? Could a piece of power equipment be brought in to move the safe?

My safe weighs 1365lbs empty, and it took 4 professional movers and myself 2.5 hours of tedious navigation to get it in position. We used a heavy duty dolly and my floor jacks. We also did this with the door off, which is probably 1/3 of the total weight alone. Let's just say I highly dread the day I have to move.

I'd recommend the burglars bring in a professional and just crack it where it sits.

dpadams6
11-26-2012, 13:06
In over 30 years of law enforcement, I've never seen it.

The old saying is that you don't have to bolt down your safe until after your first burglary.

I have two 30" safes because 30" is the widest I can physically get into my house. They are bolted together, so if they can get it out, they deserve it.
20 years here and not once. Burglars want to get out asap. Maybe if you live in the middle of no where and no one else around it might be more likely, but still very rare. I think its also important to not tell everyone what's in your safe. You don't want to make it tempting for whoever you know or people that know them and find out.

.264 magnum
11-26-2012, 13:10
In over 30 years of law enforcement, I've never seen it.

The old saying is that you don't have to bolt down your safe until after your first burglary.

I have two 30" safes because 30" is the widest I can physically get into my house. They are bolted together, so if they can get it out, they deserve it.

I know four Dallas cops fairly well. None of the them has seen a large safe removed either although they know it happens.

Most times some random BG breaks in and either ignores ones safe entirely or tries to open a safe with a screwdriver or small crow-bar and quits after one minute of effort.

KennyFSU
11-26-2012, 13:14
Some great stories, thanks for sharing.

I just purchased a safe, the current weight (loaded) is easily over 350 lbs.

I really don't want to have it anchored in BUT if stolen safes were a common occurrence, I would.

.264 magnum
11-26-2012, 13:18
The first burglary case I ever worked, a doctor had a medium sized safe stolen from his office. I still remember it well:

They managed to use the alarm code to shut off the alarm. :whistling:

It had his "very valuable coin collection" inside. :whistling:

He needed a report for the insurance, but I didn't get to ask him the details because he was on a plane to Las Vegas, so I discussed it with his brother. :whistling:
Apparently the insurance gave them some trouble about waiting to see if it could be recovered, so the same brother showed up a few weeks later with the empty safe that he just happened to "spot down over the river bank in another part of the county as he was driving by.":upeyes:

It wasn't bolted down.

Hmmmmm......seems legit. One of my best friends is a lawyer/insurance fraud investigator, he has at least 100 great stories.

Stuff like......
Malefactor: "Mr. Investigator I was in Jackson MS the night my diamond encrusted Rolex was stolen from my otherwise pristine home in Dallas"

Buddy: "Interesting because I have phone records that show several cell-calls to friends and family from your phone indicating your phone was in Dallas that night." "And a cash withdrawal was made using your bank card at x time that same night also in Dallas and that ATM took a picture of you."

.264 magnum
11-26-2012, 13:19
Some great stories, thanks for sharing.

I just purchased a safe, the current weight (loaded) is easily over 350 lbs.

I really don't want to have it anchored in BUT if stolen safes were a common occurrence, I would.

I'd anchor it. Does so makes losing your valuables even less likely.

sciolist
11-26-2012, 13:27
My reason for bolting my large safe down is not so much to prevent it from being removed from the house, but to prevent it from being tipped over. It was a PITA to get in the house, and would be seriously difficult to get out with the contents inside. But I could tip it over by myself, were it not bolted down. Laying it down would make it easier to break into.

Fear Night
11-26-2012, 14:12
Some great stories, thanks for sharing.

I just purchased a safe, the current weight (loaded) is easily over 350 lbs.

I really don't want to have it anchored in BUT if stolen safes were a common occurrence, I would.
At that weight, I'd recommend anchoring it down. 4 men carrying it off is less than 100lbs for each to lift a piece.

500-600lb motorcycles find their way into the back of pickup trucks all the time with enough hands and a little elbow grease.

KennyFSU
11-26-2012, 14:21
Funny you mention that; I had a bike stolen that way years ago, lol.

Steve0853
11-26-2012, 14:43
Some great stories, thanks for sharing.

I just purchased a safe, the current weight (loaded) is easily over 350 lbs.

I really don't want to have it anchored in BUT if stolen safes were a common occurrence, I would.


I'd also anchor that safe. 350 lbs. is not a lot at all for someone who has decided that they had rather steal than work for a living.

Batesmotel
11-26-2012, 15:28
My biological father tried it.

Hooked a chain to it and dragged it out the front door. He and his partner attempted to drag it home. They got pulled over 3 blocks away dragging it down State Street in Salt Lake City at 3:00 AM.

They claimed someone just left it on the side of the road and the hook on the chain grabbed their car as they drove over it.

He went back to prison.

KennyFSU
11-26-2012, 15:29
My biological father tried it.

Hooked a chain to it and dragged it out the front door. He and his partner attempted to drag it home. They got pulled over 3 blocks away dragging it down State Street in Salt Lake City at 3:00 AM.

They claimed someone just left it on the side of the road and the hook on the chain grabbed their car as they drove over it.

He went back to prison.

Holy cow, now THAT'S a story! :wow:

Batesmotel
11-26-2012, 15:34
Holy cow, now THAT'S a story! :wow:

I never met him. He got my mother pregnant right after he got out of prison. (Back of a 57 Chevy at a drive in movie) Armed robbery I think. He wanted to marry her and was looking for some quick cash. I was adopted. Met her about 15 years ago.

jtull7
11-26-2012, 17:58
Since I have in-floor radiant heat, I cannot bolt my safe down. I used to keep it in the garage and it was bolted then. But I have flooding problems in the garage, so I moved the safe into the house.

larry_minn
11-26-2012, 18:34
Well the local ATM was (attempted) to be stolen. It weighs 300+ lbs, was bolted down,etc inside store.
The crooks waked around Police Cheif's house (we found tracks in snow, followed them to gas station)
They stole a pickup that they backed thru front doors, ran chain to ATM. The chain was not quite up to load. Sadly the end of chain didn't catch anyone (solid)

.264 magnum
11-26-2012, 18:40
My biological father tried it.

Hooked a chain to it and dragged it out the front door. He and his partner attempted to drag it home. They got pulled over 3 blocks away dragging it down State Street in Salt Lake City at 3:00 AM.

They claimed someone just left it on the side of the road and the hook on the chain grabbed their car as they drove over it.

He went back to prison.

Sorry bro. In spite of that and all the back story than must accompany it you turned out great - I'm proud of your kids so I know you must be as well. At the end of the day it's our kids that matter the most IMO.

Cavalry Doc
11-26-2012, 18:43
In over 30 years of law enforcement, I've never seen it.

The old saying is that you don't have to bolt down your safe until after your first burglary.

I have two 30" safes because 30" is the widest I can physically get into my house. They are bolted together, so if they can get it out, they deserve it.

Now that is a good idea.

:wavey:

boozer
11-26-2012, 19:28
When I went to pick up my son from his girlfriends house a couple years ago I saw a police car in the driveway of a house a couple doors down.

He told me they were broken into.

The thieves waited until the owner left, drove around to the back yard, backed over the patio, through the french doors and into the great room.

Ran upstairs, punched holes through enough walls to encircle the safe with a cable, winched the safe through the walls, through the upstairs railing, crashing it to the first floor.

Finished winching it into the truck and left. The safe was found broken and abandoned a week later.

Of course these losers thought they had scored big, and they did, but how do you get rid of one of a kind jewellery, watches, and guns?

They ended up dumping most of it when one of the crew got busted trying to sell a high end 1911. They all ended up in prison. The news reported the contents of the safe at $2 million.

One of the carpenters on a recent remodeling job turned out to be one of the culprits.

So absolutely bolt them down/together, that will deter the usual kick and grab housebreakers.

A couple of guys with a truck, winch, and a partner saw, could get about any safe out of a house if they thought it was worth it.

relayman
11-26-2012, 19:50
My safe is not bolted down . Home security system , and you would have to remove at least 3 doors to get it out the front door . Nothing gets past the nosy ***** across the street . Back door is not an option . Elevated deck .

4 glocks
11-26-2012, 20:23
Some great stories, thanks for sharing.

I just purchased a safe, the current weight (loaded) is easily over 350 lbs.

I really don't want to have it anchored in BUT if stolen safes were a common occurrence, I would.


As others have said 350 lbs is not that hard to move, not easy but can be done.

I have my safe bolted down and feel better that way.

Kalmah
11-26-2012, 20:56
My ex-fiancee had her house broken in to a few years ago. She didn't even have a safe, just a Stack-On gun cabinet. Wasn't anchored or anything. There were pry marks on it but they didn't get it open, and they didn't take it.

As has already been mentioned, most burglaries are of the smash and grab variety and they want to get in and get out as quickly as possible. If it's going to take more than a minute to get it open or get it out the door, they're probably going to give up on it.

collim1
11-27-2012, 01:51
I've investigated hundreds of home burglaries over the years. I have never seen a bolted down safe carted off. I have only seen 1 full size gun safe taken from the house, it was not bolted. We found it on the side of the road empty, looked like they got into it with a wood splitter on the backside.

The safes I see taken are the junk "sentry" personal safes that you can buy at walmart.

There are professional crews out there that very few preventative measures will defeat. However, most of the crews out working are juveniles, drug addicts, and jobless scum. They could be considered "professional" as this is a major source of income for them, but they are not "professional" in their abilities. They go after fast easy scores looking for electronics, jewelry, guns and cash. In and out in a few mins.

Buy a real safe, not a "gun cabinet", mount it to the floor and studs in the wall, and if possible put it in a closet. By being inside a closet it makes swinging an axe or maul at it more difficult, and gives them less room to try to pry it from the studs or push it over.

If the right person gets in your house there is little you can do to keep them out of your safe, but buying a good safe and mounting it properly will protect you in most cases.

Foxtrotx1
11-27-2012, 02:20
If bolting in not an option:

Keep several hundred pounds of ammo in there. Cases of .308 come to mind.

HKLovingIT
11-27-2012, 07:52
I'm not a cop but..., here is my two cents:

I think the greatest danger is telling people you have a safe or firearms or whatever. You might trust that person, but they mention it off hand to someone you don't know, then they mention it to someone off hand you don't know, who mentions it to someone of bad intent, like their nephew the meth head.

Then you got a guy and his two tweaker buddies in your house or waiting for you to come home at night, with a gun to your head telling you he will blow your brains out if you don't open the safe.

Shhhh....loose lips and all...

arclight610
11-27-2012, 07:58
Doubt that many burglars show up at the scene with a fork lift and flat bed truck.

Nope. I just show up with a van with "Safe Repair Man" painted on the side of it. :whistling:

PEC-Memphis
11-27-2012, 09:21
Since I have in-floor radiant heat, I cannot bolt my safe down. I used to keep it in the garage and it was bolted then. But I have flooding problems in the garage, so I moved the safe into the house.

How about the wall?

jtull7
11-27-2012, 09:30
PEC-Memphis, my walls are adobe. Plain old mud.

Kawabuggy
11-27-2012, 10:17
HKlovingit has it right.. People won't come prepared to break into your safe if they don't know you have a safe. He is right on the money. When we were young all the break-ins in the neighborhood were being done by other teenage kids in the neighborhood that knew the victims, and knew exactly what was in the home. I have had many discussions with my children when they have friends over about NOT DISCUSSING anything of value we might have in the home. We plan beforehand when other kids, or even adults, are going to be in the home and we lock everything up so that it is out of sight and we never discuss with ANYONE things that don't need to be discussed outside the immediate members of the household. In my mind, this is the first plan of defense, coupled with a good home alarm system that is monitored by a reputable company.

HKLovingIT
11-27-2012, 10:44
HKlovingit has it right.. People won't come prepared to break into your safe if they don't know you have a safe. He is right on the money. When we were young all the break-ins in the neighborhood were being done by other teenage kids in the neighborhood that knew the victims, and knew exactly what was in the home. I have had many discussions with my children when they have friends over about NOT DISCUSSING anything of value we might have in the home. We plan beforehand when other kids, or even adults, are going to be in the home and we lock everything up so that it is out of sight and we never discuss with ANYONE things that don't need to be discussed outside the immediate members of the household. In my mind, this is the first plan of defense, coupled with a good home alarm system that is monitored by a reputable company.

Right on the money. The first rule of fight club. Kids trained to keep info about our "stuff" to themselves.

When I was a kid a rash of break-ins happened in our neighborhood as well. Same reason. Same situation with teens who knew when people were out of town and what they had in the house generally speaking.

When I have people over that I "know", but don't really know, such as a party or work/social gathering, I sanitize the place for everything and double check all prescriptions locked up, no personal papers left out anywhere, etc. etc.

Buy any big ticket items, it's driven in the garage, unloaded door closed whenever possible, box it came in torn to bits, bagged and trashed.

Don't advertise.

Batesmotel
11-27-2012, 10:55
Sorry bro. In spite of that and all the back story than must accompany it you turned out great - I'm proud of your kids so I know you must be as well. At the end of the day it's our kids that matter the most IMO.

Thank you.

I learned very you don't need to make your parents mistakes.