State Trooper steals money/jewelry off fatal crash victim [Archive] - Glock Talk

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harlenm
11-29-2012, 19:48
http://www.ctpost.com/news/article/State-cops-trooper-stole-from-dead-man-4077756.php

Bruce M
11-29-2012, 19:57
Pretty stupid of him.

*ASH*
11-29-2012, 19:59
what a fing scumbag :steamed:





and IBTL . im wagering it wont go 2 pages

JMS
11-29-2012, 20:02
Making 6 figures and he'd risk his job for $4000-$5000?? :upeyes:

cowboywannabe
11-29-2012, 20:10
when i was in FTO i was working a fatal wreck, an old timer (Ron) came over while i was doing an invetory and grabbed a cigarette off the dash board, lighted it and began smoking. i looked at my FTO and didnt know what to say, my fto said "Ron, what are you doing"?

Ron said is a deep Haus Cartwright voice with a build to match: "he aint going to smoke no more unless he goes down there" (pointing at the ground).

happy seal
11-29-2012, 20:12
What a dirtball! He is sittng on his butt with full pay while we work paying his salary. Any job I know he would be fired period. That police union is brazen to stand up for those type of rights. Worst yet he will pay a fine and that is all. Hell, I bet he even gets his job back.

Restless28
11-29-2012, 20:12
when i was in FTO i was working a fatal wreck, an old timer (Ron) came over while i was doing an invetory and grabbed a cigarette off the dash board, lighted it and began smoking. i looked at my FTO and didnt know what to say, my fto said "Ron, what are you doing"?

Ron said is a deep Haus Cartwright voice with a build to match: "he aint going to smoke no more unless he goes down there" (pointing at the ground).

Old timers rock.

tadbart
11-29-2012, 20:13
State Troopers. AAA with a badge.

gjk5
11-29-2012, 20:15
forget that he is a cop, why would anyone who makes over 6 figures a year risk a good paying job and great retirement bennies for $3K?


retard.


ETA: JMS beat me to it.

M2 Carbine
11-29-2012, 20:16
You don't just all the sudden become the low life that would steal from a dying man.
Makes you wonder what else he's been doing for years.

They can roast his ass for all I care but I feel for his wife and kids.

Gallium
11-29-2012, 20:16
Fun and games aside, here is a link of the police officers in CT who have been decertified, for whatever reasons.

http://www.ct.gov/post/lib/post/certification/list_of_decertified_officers.pdf

Restless28
11-29-2012, 20:17
State Troopers. AAA with a badge.

Truth. The graviest of LE jobs.

Gallium
11-29-2012, 20:24
Truth. The graviest of LE jobs.

No, not by a long stretch. The cushiest jobs include working for the DA, working for the state's AGs office, working courts, working gigs that don't involve a lot of anything.

If anything, state policing is often as tough as it gets being out there by your lonesome, and in lots of cases, the state police academy is harder than (example only) a city/county gig.

Granted, in some states everybody goes thru the same academy, but to say that a troopers job is cake is like me saying I'm going to row from Bristol, England to Boston in a week, and then run the Boston Marathon.

It really aint that simple.

cowboywannabe
11-29-2012, 20:25
Old timers rock.

i should add that this was in 1991 with a state agency in the urban "midwest"....back when you could call a flasher a weeny wagger and not get suspended.

janice6
11-29-2012, 20:28
Temptation and action is a terrible combination. What a shame.

rednoved
11-29-2012, 20:28
I imagine he will lose his job. Seems fair.

gjk5
11-29-2012, 20:29
No, not by a long stretch. The cushiest jobs include working for the DA, working for the state's AGs office, working courts, working gigs that don't involve a lot of anything.

If anything, state policing is often as tough as it gets being out there by your lonesome, and in lots of cases, the state police academy is harder than (example only) a city/county gig.

Granted, in some states everybody goes thru the same academy, but to say that a troopers job is cake is like me saying I'm going to row from Bristol, England to Boston in a week, and then run the Boston Marathon.

It really aint that simple.

I usually agree with you, and I think I do on the point you were making, but I don't think I get the analogy........:whistling:

Restless28
11-29-2012, 20:32
No, not by a long stretch. The cushiest jobs include working for the DA, working for the state's AGs office, working courts, working gigs that don't involve a lot of anything.

If anything, state policing is often as tough as it gets being out there by your lonesome, and in lots of cases, the state police academy is harder than (example only) a city/county gig.

Granted, in some states everybody goes thru the same academy, but to say that a troopers job is cake is like me saying I'm going to row from Bristol, England to Boston in a week, and then run the Boston Marathon.

It really aint that simple.

Patrol troopers in Alabama ride the gravy train. Troopers are required to standby on highway construction sights here. Part of the job?

No, it's all overtime. The off duty guys close to retirement padded their income by thousands of dollars to pad their pension.

Meanwhile, municipal police and deputies serve warrants and do a helluva lot more than run radar guns.

Scott3670
11-29-2012, 20:35
I had to toss my badge after a bad injury during a training exercise. To this day I can hold my head high and say that at least I tried to to the job. But this ass hat makes anyone who has ever had the honor of wearing a badge look bad. I hope he gets bent over in jail... frequently and painfully.

JDennis
11-29-2012, 20:41
No, not by a long stretch. The cushiest jobs include working for the DA, working for the state's AGs office, working courts, working gigs that don't involve a lot of anything.

If anything, state policing is often as tough as it gets being out there by your lonesome, and in lots of cases, the state police academy is harder than (example only) a city/county gig.

Granted, in some states everybody goes thru the same academy, but to say that a troopers job is cake is like me saying I'm going to row from Bristol, England to Boston in a week, and then run the Boston Marathon.

It really aint that simple.

I can agree to a point. But the only time I been belittled and insulted by a LEO has been troopers. In both states I have lived in. My grandfather is a retired trooper so I have no prejudice but they are a different breed so to speak. I imagine the swing in stand up and corrupt can be greater. No matter what happens LEO is for the greater good (and sometimes a pita for us good citizens that have brain fart). It is a travesty that some bad eggs feel the need to do this. I hope he gets what he deserves.

Fox184
11-29-2012, 20:57
I know of a former trooper that was caught stealing. He now has a felony conviction and is riding the gravy train. He claimed PTSD or some crap, received a medical retirement, and is getting a check from the state for the rest of his miserable life. Hell, the agency even issued him a retiree ID card.

If that doesn't chap your ass nothing will.

ticktwrter
11-29-2012, 21:04
Several years ago a neighboring officer actually took concert tickets from the body of a fatal crash victim. He figured no ne would miss them. He was caught when he went to the concert but the dead guy's family were in the connecting seats....cost him his job as it should have.

BamaTrooper
11-29-2012, 21:19
Patrol troopers in Alabama ride the gravy train. Troopers are required to standby on highway construction sights here. Part of the job?

No, it's all overtime. The off duty guys close to retirement padded their income by thousands of dollars to pad their pension.

Meanwhile, municipal police and deputies serve warrants and do a helluva lot more than run radar guns.

Troopers in AL are limited in the amount of overtime they can apply to their retirement. That limit is 20% of their base pay. The majority of the overtime is alloted to the lower ranking (and lower paid Troopers).
Construction zone OT is paid through the DOT and areas with large numbers of construction zones will be required to use other agencies.

Your only run radar gun comment requires only this :upeyes:.

Restless28
11-29-2012, 21:25
Troopers in AL are limited in the amount of overtime they can apply to their retirement. That limit is 20% of their base pay. The majority of the overtime is alloted to the lower ranking (and lower paid Troopers).
Construction zone OT is paid through the DOT and areas with large numbers of construction zones will be required to use other agencies.

Your only run radar gun comment requires only this :upeyes:.

So, at $50k, a trooper can earn $10k of OT. The average salary of the final 3 out of 5 years determines the monthly pension.

These city and county cops are in harm's way more the the troopers.

The Machinist
11-29-2012, 21:31
If anything, state policing is often as tough as it gets being out there by your lonesome, and in lots of cases, the state police academy is harder than (example only) a city/county gig.
Yep. Parking behind a bush at 3 AM itching for the chance to write a ticket to the first guy going five over must be real tough.

cowboywannabe
11-29-2012, 21:44
i can see where this is going....IBTL.

JDennis
11-29-2012, 21:56
Yep. Parking behind a bush at 3 AM itching for the chance to write a ticket to the first guy going five over must be real tough.


If it keeps me from getting slammed into by a drunk driver when I am leaving a friends house or a night out with my g/f then hell yes!!

BossGodfrey
11-29-2012, 22:04
These are the people we are told to respect and obey without question. Yea right. It's a shame a few bad apples make the other 50% look bad !

Cochese
11-29-2012, 22:05
These city and county cops are in harm's way more the the troopers.

You have no idea what you are talking about. At all.

:upeyes:

Sincerely,

City & County cop.

cowboywannabe
11-29-2012, 22:09
funny, this cop was arrested and will be prosecuted by who? thats right, cops.

Rabbi
11-29-2012, 22:10
funny, this cop was arrested and will be prosecuted by who? thats right, cops.



Cops dont prosecute people. That is not how it works.

Cochese
11-29-2012, 22:10
State Troopers. AAA with a badge.

You couldn't be more wrong.

Maybe we should cue the murse jokes.

Cochese
11-29-2012, 22:11
Cops dont prosecute people. That is not how it works.

In a manner of speaking they do.

And CW has been a cop longer than you and I combined and doubled. ;)

c01
11-29-2012, 22:11
Cops dont prosecute people. That is not how it works.

Thanks Rabbi

ray9898
11-29-2012, 22:12
WTH??? I understand temptation and how certain situations can be a character test. What I will never understand is how people rationalize the risk knowing if you get caught you will destroy everything you know. Good riddance.

Cochese
11-29-2012, 22:13
Yep. Parking behind a bush at 3 AM itching for the chance to write a ticket to the first guy going five over must be real tough.

Spoken like someone who never has walked in harms way.

:wavey:

Gallium
11-29-2012, 22:13
I usually agree with you, and I think I do on the point you were making, but I don't think I get the analogy........:whistling:

Ok. I actually rowed from England to Boston since my last post, and completed the marathon (but I stopped to check in on the LaBeefa thread, and thus I came in 5th).

My point is, that ^^ little story there is bulls-scat, just like the claim he made.



Yep. Parking behind a bush at 3 AM itching for the chance to write a ticket to the first guy going five over must be real tough.

I hate to go Rabbi/Won on you, but you have CHERRY picked one singular activity as a basis of your dislike for troopers? The last guy who operated on my kid...he left somethings to be desired, but that don't mean all doctors are idiots.

cowboywannabe
11-29-2012, 22:13
Cops dont prosecute people. That is not how it works.

you know what i mean, or so i thought.

Rabbi
11-29-2012, 22:14
In a manner of speaking they do.

And CW has been a cop longer than you and I combined and doubled. ;)

Lots of people have been a cop longer than I have but I still dont see how cops prosecute anyone. Looking at the legal definition of the word, you would have to be rather liberal with it.

Rabbi
11-29-2012, 22:15
you know what i mean, or so i thought.

Fair enough.

Rabbi
11-29-2012, 22:16
Yep. Parking behind a bush at 3 AM itching for the chance to write a ticket to the first guy going five over must be real tough.

And what happens when that "first guy" has a warrant for hurting someone you love?

Cochese
11-29-2012, 22:18
Yep. Parking behind a bush at 3 AM itching for the chance to write a ticket to the first guy going five over must be real tough.

This trooper got bored running radar and went looking for some second degree burns to keep him busy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtMFuXA5sOs&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Cochese
11-29-2012, 22:18
And what happens when that "first guy" has a warrant for hurting someone you love?

Exactly.

Cochese
11-29-2012, 22:19
Lots of people have been a cop longer than I have but I still dont see how cops prosecute anyone. Looking at the legal definition of the word, you would have to be rather liberal with it.

Stop being such a *******ed scientist.

:supergrin:

Wil Ufgood
11-29-2012, 22:20
Guy's a tool for what he did, that being said, a lot of ignorant posts here.

Cochese
11-29-2012, 22:24
Lots of people have been a cop longer than I have but I still dont see how cops prosecute anyone. Looking at the legal definition of the word, you would have to be rather liberal with it.

The other day, I had a jury trial on a DWI/intox assault. The prosecutor, who is a nice guy, but has been an ADA for four months invited me on as an advisory witness.

I essentially walked him through the parts he didn't understand, provided him with direction on direct/redirect/cross, eliminated folks in Voir Dire, etc.

Afterward, he thanked me for the win and asked if I enjoyed my ride along. :supergrin:

Cochese
11-29-2012, 22:26
Oh and for the record, this soon to be former trooper, if guilty, should take the full ride and enjoy jail and the want ads.

cowboywannabe
11-29-2012, 22:31
why all the crap against state cops, county cops, city cops.....? a cop is a cop when the fists or bullets start flying.

some act like asses when they get their commission......there are two kinds of cops, those who carry the badge and those who have the badge to carry them.

Cochese
11-29-2012, 22:35
why all the crap against state cops, county cops, city cops.....? a cop is a cop when the fists or bullets start flying.

some act like asses when they get their commission......there are two kinds of cops, those who carry the badge and those who have the badge to carry them.

Well said.

JLB768
11-29-2012, 22:54
What a shame, I'm sure this is a rare event.

CAcop
11-29-2012, 23:01
Lots of people have been a cop longer than I have but I still dont see how cops prosecute anyone. Looking at the legal definition of the word, you would have to be rather liberal with it.

There are a few places that actually do have cops prosecute cases. Mas Ayoob has described doing so in his jurisdiction. In my area all muni and vehicle code tickets are prosecuted by the police. Some are even misdos. I feel bad for people who hire lawyers for $350 an hour for a $500 misdo.

I will grant you the cases most people think about are not run in court by cops.

devildog2067
11-29-2012, 23:02
I imagine he will lose his job. Seems fair.

Fair? Robbing a dying guy is one of the scummier things that a person can do. He belongs behind bars.

CAcop
11-29-2012, 23:12
So, at $50k, a trooper can earn $10k of OT. The average salary of the final 3 out of 5 years determines the monthly pension.

These city and county cops are in harm's way more the the troopers.

If you knew what you were talking about you would know from last years stats that traffic stops, disturbances, and ambushes were tied for first place for what kills cops. It used to be traffic accidents in first place but people like shooting at cops when they get a chance. If a trooper is doing a lot of traffic stops his odds of getting into a shooting are much higher than a city cop taking cold paper calls.

If you wear a uniform and a badge you are a target the minute you leave the office. It doesn't matter what color the uniform is or what the patch says on your sleeve.

Detectorist
11-29-2012, 23:43
If you knew what you were talking about you would know from last years stats that traffic stops, disturbances, and ambushes were tied for first place for what kills cops. It used to be traffic accidents in first place but people like shooting at cops when they get a chance. If a trooper is doing a lot of traffic stops his odds of getting into a shooting are much higher than a city cop taking cold paper calls.

If you wear a uniform and a badge you are a target the minute you leave the office. It doesn't matter what color the uniform is or what the patch says on your sleeve.

Every time I open the paper I read about a Cop getting hurt or killed during a traffic stop.

Detectorist
11-29-2012, 23:44
There's bad apples everywhere. Good cops are glad this guy got caught. Heck, I'm glad he got caught.

GRIMLET
11-30-2012, 00:32
Truth. The graviest of LE jobs.

I think not my good man.....for I have the thickest gravy in state le service.


Posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire (http://www.outdoorhub.com/mobile/)

Half-Breed
11-30-2012, 04:26
The bottom line is, a thief stole. Period. It doesn't matter if he was a cop, doctor, lawyer, accountant, engineer, mechanic, electrician, plumber or whatever. There are rotten apples in every profession.

Why does the GT membership continue to single out just a few professions, unless they have an ax to grind?

Bren
11-30-2012, 04:57
See, GNG, I told you you'd find something to make up for the horror of that NYPD officer buying shoes for the homeless guy. You guys must be thrilled, like it's christmas already.

Baba Louie
11-30-2012, 05:04
Why does the GT membership continue to single out just a few professions, unless they have an ax to grind?Because some Professions are held to a higher standard for good reason, even tho they are all human with the strengths and weakness' found therein, even while representing Authority. Tis human nature in some to dogpile on those with exposed human flaws or who misuse that authority? (and some people simply hate Coppers)

It's the stereotyping or generalization that one size fits all that gets old to me.

They/we should all walk a mile in those mocassins (and still we'd bemoan those who screw the pooch)

I'm sure the other Troopers working with the Officer in question are being pretty hard on him now... amongst themselves. As it should be. But let the investigation bear out the facts and allow the chips to fall where they may.

It could be that the money and jewelry in question left the motorcycle driver victim during the dynamics of the accident (ouch), was gathered up by said Trooper at the scene and... (I got nothing from there, depending on how said stuff was found in cruiser or discovered by whomsoever discovered it... eh?)

I feel for both sets of family members.

Bren
11-30-2012, 05:20
Because some Professions are held to a higher standard for good reason, even tho they are all human with the strengths and weakness' found therein, even while representing Authority.

And here a GT they are "held to a higher standard" by the same people who keep posting "they're no better than us and shouldn't get any rights we don't have." That's called a double standard.

noway
11-30-2012, 05:59
The only thing that really counts, is the office went home safe :upeyes:

TheExplorer
11-30-2012, 06:13
You don't just all the sudden become the low life that would steal from a dying man.
Makes you wonder what else he's been doing for years.

They can roast his ass for all I care but I feel for his wife and kids.

Exactly.

Doesn't matter what field you're in.

Gallium
11-30-2012, 06:23
And here a GT they are "held to a higher standard" by the same people who keep posting "they're no better than us and shouldn't get any rights we don't have." That's called a double standard.


Let us be frank with each other.



Police should be held to high standards of integrity, because they are often called to task to enforce the law
Police (USA) should be held to high standards of handgun marksmanship, because the most lethal tool they have on their persons is usually a pistol
Police should be held to high standards of people handling skills, including verbal and physical "judo", because as a part of enforcing the law means they will have to go hands on with folks.
When police break the law we expect the full effect of the law to be administered because they had to sit thru so many boring sessions on the law, court procedures, etc - in other words, they really do know better.



If a judge breaks the law, I advocate implementing justice at the most severe level applicable for his/her case.


It's kinda like how we (well in my sphere of work) punish educators more severely for plagarism and cheating than we punish students.


Like how I give the real stink eye to the docs and nurses aggregated outside Sloane-Kettering Hospital (oncology, etc) smoking.


Like if I hear folks who profess to be "martial artists" getting their asses handed to them by "ordinary joes".

Keoking
11-30-2012, 06:33
Truth. The graviest of LE jobs.

FWIW, where I grew up in CT, the towns were too small to justify their own police force. CT State Troopers handled all policing.

rong338
11-30-2012, 06:39
http://www.ctpost.com/news/article/State-cops-trooper-stole-from-dead-man-4077756.php


Word is he has already "retired" but can't collect his pension until he is 59.5. He was also a union rep for the district he was assigned!

Bren
11-30-2012, 06:55
Wait a second - a connecticut trooper "earned $111,967 in 2011"? Does that include his wife's income or something?

Officer X
11-30-2012, 06:59
Just throwing this out there because this is all the article states and I find it kind of vague:

"When family of the accident victim, 49-year-old John Scalesse, of Orange, noticed that some of his possessions, including cash and jewelry were missing, they called the state police.

Investigators found Scalesse's clothing at the hospital -- but the other items were missing. They later discovered a large amount of cash in the trooper's cruiser."



Clothes would be at the hospital after medical staff removed and bagged them, any valuables would be handed right over to our officers to be given to family members or if none were available, logged and secured in our evidence locker. How much later were these items found in his troop car? Did he get busy with other invests and figure he'd take of logging them later? Was it a case of criminality and if so, why would he leave it in his troop car that the bosses could easily go into without a warrant? Was it a case of just being lazy? As a former union rep., was there a history and now this can be used as payback?

I think these are all valid questions. If it is shown that he was just a thief, then he should pay the price for it.

Bren
11-30-2012, 07:00
So, at $50k, a trooper can earn $10k of OT. The average salary of the final 3 out of 5 years determines the monthly pension.

These city and county cops are in harm's way more the the troopers.

Maybe in your state - definitely not in all. Here, state troopers do all the same law enforcement as counties and cities and, at many times and place, are the only law enforcement. Where I used to work, a single trooper would often be the only on-duty cop in a couple of counties, answering every call alone, from traffic to robberies, domestic violence, murders, etc., often with no chance of backup closer than a half hour or more away. No 24-hour city police, no 24-hour sheriffs, just state police in the rural counties. If you can't handle trouble, from fistfights to gunfights, without backup, you quit.

rong338
11-30-2012, 07:17
Just throwing this out there because this is all the article states and I find it kind of vague:

"When family of the accident victim, 49-year-old John Scalesse, of Orange, noticed that some of his possessions, including cash and jewelry were missing, they called the state police.

Investigators found Scalesse's clothing at the hospital -- but the other items were missing. They later discovered a large amount of cash in the trooper's cruiser."



Clothes would be at the hospital after medical staff removed and bagged them, any valuables would be handed right over to our officers to be given to family members or if none were available, logged and secured in our evidence locker. How much later were these items found in his troop car? Did he get busy with other invests and figure he'd take of logging them later? Was it a case of criminality and if so, why would he leave it in his troop car that the bosses could easily go into without a warrant? Was it a case of just being lazy? As a former union rep., was there a history and now this can be used as payback?

I think these are all valid questions. If it is shown that he was just a thief, then he should pay the price for it.


Apparently he went on vacation and when he returned they checked his cruiser and the cash and jewelry were still in it.

Gallium
11-30-2012, 07:22
Just throwing this out there because this is all the article states and I find it kind of vague:

"When family of the accident victim, 49-year-old John Scalesse, of Orange, noticed that some of his possessions, including cash and jewelry were missing, they called the state police.

Investigators found Scalesse's clothing at the hospital -- but the other items were missing. They later discovered a large amount of cash in the trooper's cruiser."



Clothes would be at the hospital after medical staff removed and bagged them, any valuables would be handed right over to our officers to be given to family members or if none were available, logged and secured in our evidence locker. How much later were these items found in his troop car? Did he get busy with other invests and figure he'd take of logging them later? Was it a case of criminality and if so, why would he leave it in his troop car that the bosses could easily go into without a warrant? Was it a case of just being lazy? As a former union rep., was there a history and now this can be used as payback?

I think these are all valid questions. If it is shown that he was just a thief, then he should pay the price for it.

You are a cop, you know this is not how it works for a cop (trooper) to be arrested on these types of charges.

Officer X
11-30-2012, 07:29
Apparently he went on vacation and when he returned they checked his cruiser and the cash and jewelry were still in it.

Was it a take home car or one left at the troop barracks that only he used?

This leads me to feel that he was forgetful, lazy, a duma.. or a combination. He had vacation on his mind and wanted to wrap things up and get going. I would think that if a trooper was going to steal a few thousand dollars off a dead person right before he was scheduled to go on vacation, he would take that with him for extra spending money.

BamaTrooper
11-30-2012, 07:38
So, at $50k, a trooper can earn $10k of OT. The average salary of the final 3 out of 5 years determines the monthly pension.

These city and county cops are in harm's way more the the troopers.

We can agree that city police and county deputies answer more calls of a wider variety and therefore are at greater risk from calls like domestic violence, but following your reasoning, the officers assigned to traffic details and civil process service aren't in as much danger as their patrol brothers.

Should you have a Trooper that works solely as a traffic cop, writing tickets and not checking further than "license and registration, please" then yeah it might be less dangerous than city/county criminal response. When, however, you have Troopers looking beyond the traffic stop, working in high crime areas to make arrests of criminals, then the argument loses steam.

One aspect of a Trooper's job that I think people often overlook is death notification; someone has to let families know their sons and daughters have been killed and, unlike violent crime death where the family has some inkling, an in-person cold call notification is usually a shock.
I've done about 80-90 of them; they aren't my favorite thing.


And for a Trooper to make 50k, he would have to be here about 10-15 years IF HE WAS GETTING RAISES.

Officer X
11-30-2012, 07:46
You are a cop, you know this is not how it works for a cop (trooper) to be arrested on these types of charges.

How do you know what I know?

In my career I have seen some pretty vindictive things done. Bad blood between officers, disputes that are years old remembered when one becomes a boss and wants retribution. I've seen a couple cases where union reps have had multiple charges signed against them just after they've taken action against the administration and watched as chiefs have gone out of their way to make their lives miserable.

I've seen chiefs try to pursue criminal charges against officers they just didn't like and have the county prosecutor's office advise that they will not support those charges, then have the department sign all kinds of departmental disciplinary charges trying to fire the officer only to have judges drop everything in arbitration.

I now lead the unit in charge of all IA invests and have been at odds with my own chief as he has wanted to use my office to "get back" at officers he doesn't care for. For some reason, he still wants me in that position, maybe I'm the voice of reason for him, I don't know.

Then again, this guy may just be a common thief. With the information provided, I have more questions than answers.

jason10mm
11-30-2012, 07:52
I don't think he "stole" anything, looks like it was right there in his duty vehicle the whole time. He "secured" it and just forgot about it. Is it policy or SOP to do this for large amounts of cash or valuables found on the scene? Was it bagged appropriately or stuffed under a seat? Did he take it and figured he would wait to see if anyone came asking for it?

BamaTrooper
11-30-2012, 07:52
These are the people we are told to respect and obey without question. Yea right. It's a shame a few bad apples make the other 50% look bad !

50% is a few? DAYUM!!!!!!!!!!!!!

diamondd2
11-30-2012, 07:53
Wait a second - a connecticut trooper "earned $111,967 in 2011"? Does that include his wife's income or something?

No, that's just his income. Heck, NJ troopers are pulling close to 150k with OT. Jersey City cops, $130k with OT.