You guys ever eat fiddle heads? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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DrMaxit
11-30-2012, 05:03
So I stumbled across this vid and a few others and I realized I have no idea what the hell "Fiddleheads" are. What do you guys think?

Fiddle Heads

Tvov
11-30-2012, 05:51
They are "young" ferns, as far as I know. I've had them a few times, usually sauteed with butter and garlic. I think grocery stores have them in the spring sometimes.

Oh, are they good? I guess so... they didn't wow me or anything.

tantrix
11-30-2012, 06:13
Can't take anyone seriously if they cook on an electric stove.

Mrs.Cicero
11-30-2012, 06:23
I have a couple recipes around here somewhere...

Dubble-Tapper
11-30-2012, 09:32
no, but after reading a certain S. King book ive always wanted to try them

Al Czervik
11-30-2012, 09:36
They are "young" ferns, as far as I know. I've had them a few times, usually sauteed with butter and garlic. I think grocery stores have them in the spring sometimes.

Oh, are they good? I guess so... they didn't wow me or anything.

This. And, don't buy any that have opened up, or uncoiled, as they are past their prime.

FullClip
11-30-2012, 11:02
I remember my grand mother saying you had to either be Indian or French to eat them, and you had to be Indian to find them.:supergrin:

We'll I'm neither, but I love a batch of fresh fiddleheads and fired brook trout in the spring. The ferns grow along river and stream banks, and there is a very short season when you can pick them while they are still curled up tight, about the size of a 50 cent piece. You have to clean them good as inside the spiral of the new fern is the dirt and humus from the forest floor. I boil mine until they are just past the crunchy side (mushy fiddleheads are pretty nasty). A healthy splash of cider vinager and butter on them. Serve with a few small fresh brook trout about 8 inches long, pan fried in butter, and you've got a real Maine springtime treat!!:supergrin:

HerrGlock
11-30-2012, 11:09
no, but after reading a certain S. King book ive always wanted to try them

The Girl Who Loved Tom... can't remember the baseball player's name.


Good book!

Fiddleheads are just like just about any other soft green.

Dennis in MA
11-30-2012, 11:15
My wife, Fern, loves them. ;)

sebecman
11-30-2012, 12:31
Very tasty as previously noted.

I like them with vinegar and butter and a little salt.

smokeross
11-30-2012, 14:50
Every spring. They grow everywhere around here. Often times just pluck the heads off while hiking and eat them as is.

cgwahl
11-30-2012, 15:08
It's nice that they let people with mental deficiencies cook in that home, just wish they'd have let someone more grownup mentally do the video. Couldn't make it passed 30 seconds.

DrMaxit
11-30-2012, 15:23
It's nice that they let people with mental deficiencies cook in that home, just wish they'd have let someone more grownup mentally do the video. Couldn't make it passed 30 seconds.

:rofl: I'm pretty sure he's trying to be funny. And you're a grinch.

So basically you have to live where they grow wild to get them it seems eh? I'm trying to eat better and looking for more "green" stuff to try as I don't like vegetables that much.

zoyter2
11-30-2012, 17:24
I am sure it was hilarious. I wanted to punch him in the head at 7 seconds. No sense of humor that zoyter2.

Mrs.Cicero
11-30-2012, 17:52
:rofl: I'm pretty sure he's trying to be funny. And you're a grinch.

So basically you have to live where they grow wild to get them it seems eh? I'm trying to eat better and looking for more "green" stuff to try as I don't like vegetables that much.

I don't know about wild. They grow about 6 feet from my kitchen door, right near the propane tank. But the crazy green-beanie lady we bought this place from planted random stuff all over the yard (makes it darn hard to mow) - rhubarb, garlic, comfrey, horseradish (which it took me three months to even recognize 'cause we never had it growing up), walking onion, hell she planted a bunch of freaking figs in the hoop house. There's some little tiny spring plant with bitty pink flowers that has little corm-like roots that taste like potatoes down near the river, too. I looked those up in the wildflower ID book, and it mentioned they were edible so I ate them. There's some weird vine with five leaves that has blue berries on it growing on the fenceposts, too. NOT blueberries, or anything else I recognize. I ate one and didn't die, but they were more astringent than sweet, so I thought I'd not do that again...

MB-G26
11-30-2012, 18:43
I am completely confused............................ :embarassed:

Restless28
11-30-2012, 19:02
So, he's trying to be cute mimicking black folks in speech. I'm with Zoyter. That guy needs a punch.

DrMaxit
11-30-2012, 20:46
So, he's trying to be cute mimicking black folks in speech. I'm with Zoyter. That guy needs a punch.

That's what "black folks" in your area sound like? Hmm. I didn't get that impression at all.

Anyways, thanks for the replies.

RRP
11-30-2012, 20:58
Fiddlehead picking is somewhat of a tradition in my area, sorta like blueberry picking in the summer, and apple picking in the fall.

I don't boil fiddleheads. Cooking them in a microwave is easier and faster. Lightly drizzle olive oil over the cleaned fiddleheads. Then add a few shakes of Montreal Steak Seasoning. Stir to coat evenly. Nuke for 3-4 minutes, or until tender. They are very tasty cooked this way.

Harvesting fiddleheads in the wild appeals to me in a weird way that's hard to describe. I guess it fuels my fantasy of being self-sufficient.

DrMaxit
11-30-2012, 21:06
Fiddlehead picking is somewhat of a tradition in my area, sorta like blueberry picking in the summer, and apple picking in the fall.

I don't boil fiddleheads. Cooking them in a microwave is easier and faster. Lightly drizzle olive oil over the cleaned fiddleheads. Then add a few shakes of Montreal Steak Seasoning. Stir to coat evenly. Nuke for 3-4 minutes, or until tender. They are very tasty cooked this way.

Harvesting fiddleheads in the wild appeals to me in a weird way that's hard to describe. I guess it fuels my fantasy of being self-sufficient.

I've always liked harvesting food from the wild. Always seems to taste better too. :)

scwine
11-30-2012, 21:46
nope, but I heard of Fiddle Faddle (https://www.google.com/search?q=fiddle+faddle&hl=en&tbo=u&tbm=isch&source=univ&sa=X&ei=hou5ULaDBYjY2AX7xICYBQ&ved=0CEcQsAQ&biw=1440&bih=785)though.

MrsKitty
11-30-2012, 22:06
Every spring. They grow everywhere around here. Often times just pluck the heads off while hiking and eat them as is.

I've always wanted to try them after learning that was one of your safest options to eat when stranded or lost in the wilderness.

countrygun
11-30-2012, 22:43
I don't know about wild. They grow about 6 feet from my kitchen door, right near the propane tank. But the crazy green-beanie lady we bought this place from planted random stuff all over the yard (makes it darn hard to mow) - rhubarb, garlic, comfrey, horseradish (which it took me three months to even recognize 'cause we never had it growing up), walking onion, hell she planted a bunch of freaking figs in the hoop house. There's some little tiny spring plant with bitty pink flowers that has little corm-like roots that taste like potatoes down near the river, too. I looked those up in the wildflower ID book, and it mentioned they were edible so I ate them. There's some weird vine with five leaves that has blue berries on it growing on the fenceposts, too. NOT blueberries, or anything else I recognize. I ate one and didn't die, but they were more astringent than sweet, so I thought I'd not do that again...

Did the 'Blue" berries have a kind of "Holly" like leaf?
And was the fruit in the berry a deep reddish purple

"Oregon Grape"

or were the leaves more like a small laurel and the meat of the berry a paler light purple white?

'Salal"

Mrs.Cicero
12-01-2012, 06:47
Did the 'Blue" berries have a kind of "Holly" like leaf?
And was the fruit in the berry a deep reddish purple

"Oregon Grape"

or were the leaves more like a small laurel and the meat of the berry a paler light purple white?

'Salal"

Must be Salal. What the heck is Salal?

Restless28
12-01-2012, 06:53
That's what "black folks" in your area sound like? Hmm. I didn't get that impression at all.

Anyways, thanks for the replies.

Hey pal, we talk like this down south. There are all kinds of folks down here. Most of us don't use African American. You're either white or black. Don't use my words to imply racism.:wavey:

Arc Angel
12-01-2012, 08:14
I like them with balsamic vinegar, a little butter, and fried garlic. This part of northeastern Pennsylvania is, 'lousy' with them in the Spring.

(By the way, that guy in the video doesn't know the first thing about how to properly cook green vegetables. ;)

Dubble-Tapper
12-01-2012, 10:38
The Girl Who Loved Tom... can't remember the baseball player's name.


Good book!

Fiddleheads are just like just about any other soft green.

thats the one. :supergrin:

it was a very interesting read. i think about it every time im in the woods alone.

DrMaxit
12-01-2012, 22:51
Hey pal, we talk like this down south. There are all kinds of folks down here. Most of us don't use African American. You're either white or black. Don't use my words to imply racism.:wavey:

Hey Restless, It was not my intentions to make you sound racist. My purpose for using the quotes was to quote you not try an turn anything around. I don't think you're racist. I apologize for the misunderstanding.

:cheers: