So, My Cousin Texts Me..... [Archive] - Glock Talk

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M&P15T
12-04-2012, 10:42
My cousin is a CNC machinist. In the past he has made artificial replacement joints and stuff.

This morning, he texts me and tells me that the parts he is machining are really eating up his tools.

I text back asking what he is machining, to which he replies "castings". I asked for further clarification, and he replies "well, forgings".

I finally just asked "what are you making?". He replies they're parts for Delta commercial aircraft brake assemblies.

I texted back "Make them right!!!"

He texts back "Don't fly Delta!! Lmao".

Fear not folks, is actually quite good at what he does.

G29Reload
12-04-2012, 10:50
He doesnt live in western loudound does he? I live next door to a guy that does that kind of thing in the medical field and used to be an aircraft mechanic.

M&P15T
12-04-2012, 10:58
He doesnt live in western loudound does he? I live next door to a guy that does that kind of thing in the medical field and used to be an aircraft mechanic.

Nope, he's in Michigan/Indiana.

I'm actually not knowledgable on where he works.

John43
12-04-2012, 11:10
One of my friends kids said Delta stood for don't ever leave the airport.

Dennis in MA
12-04-2012, 12:06
One of my friends kids said Delta stood for don't ever leave the airport.

My grandfather used to say that.

I'm not sure if it means the PLANES never leave or that you shouldn't leave on their planes.

Bilrus61
12-04-2012, 12:08
Did you tell him the big money is in making extractors for Glocks?

M&P15T
12-04-2012, 12:18
Did you tell him the big money is in making extractors for Glocks?

I can't imagine trying to machine a part that small. Obviously it gets done, but I would imagine the smaller parts are actually harder to machine than the larger ones.

But, that's just a guess. I could be completely wrong.

crazycooter91
12-04-2012, 13:21
I can't imagine trying to machine a part that small. Obviously it gets done, but I would imagine the smaller parts are actually harder to machine than the larger ones.

But, that's just a guess. I could be completely wrong.


They are a hell of a lot harder to machine...at least for me. Two years machine shop experience if you count trade school. Taking drafting classes now...Machining isn't the career for me.

Batesmotel
12-04-2012, 15:39
I can't imagine trying to machine a part that small. Obviously it gets done, but I would imagine the smaller parts are actually harder to machine than the larger ones.

But, that's just a guess. I could be completely wrong.

I have done some macro photography on extremely tiny machined parts and assemblies for a patent attorney.

The incredible skill of the machinists and the precision of the specialized tools is amazing.

Paul_J
12-04-2012, 15:44
At Delta Airlines, they learn something from every plane they crash!

Bradhazz
12-04-2012, 17:03
I'm a machinist by trade and I can tell you castings and forgings are the worst between hard spots and voids it can kill tooling quickly. Our basic material is 316ss/410/17-4, and it just gets crazy from there with hast c or b, Monel, titanium. We have made aircraft parts in the past and the requirements are insane easily on par with nuclear specs. Since it sounds like he used to make medical parts in a job shop type place I may know where he works or he may have made stuff for us in the past when we get busy we outsource all over the Michigan area.

Rotn1
12-04-2012, 17:42
Landing gear forging steel is very special stuff.
Usually vacumn arc re-melted stainless steel. Very clean, very tough.
Need to know what you are doing to perform work like this. He must be very good.

Dubble-Tapper
12-04-2012, 20:37
I can't imagine trying to machine a part that small. Obviously it gets done, but I would imagine the smaller parts are actually harder to machine than the larger ones.

But, that's just a guess. I could be completely wrong.

small intricate parts are indeed difficult to machine.

in my machining experience, the hardest part about machining any intricate object is retention. how will you hold the part and still be able to complete the various processes in the least amount of repositioning. you have to think ahead.

Dubble-Tapper
12-04-2012, 20:40
I know quite a few Boeing union machinists.

i take the train.

dino1
12-04-2012, 21:19
I'm a glassblower and we have a machine shop as well. I can't believe they don't brake more stuff. Basically you're trusting your set up and programs and once you hit go it's all out of your hands. At least with my job I can see if I'm screwing up and compensate for it on the fly.

Dubble-Tapper
12-04-2012, 21:52
I'm a glassblower and we have a machine shop as well. I can't believe they don't brake more stuff. Basically you're trusting your set up and programs and once you hit go it's all out of your hands. At least with my job I can see if I'm screwing up and compensate for it on the fly.

its far from out of ones hands. I first modify my height offset (z axis) and run it at a much slower feed rate so you can visually see the cutting path before you touch any tools to metal.

also, you run the program in single block (single movements at a time) mode so you can prove out your program.

Dubble-Tapper
12-04-2012, 22:00
I'm a machinist by trade and I can tell you castings and forgings are the worst between hard spots and voids it can kill tooling quickly. Our basic material is 316ss/410/17-4, and it just gets crazy from there with hast c or b, Monel, titanium. We have made aircraft parts in the past and the requirements are insane easily on par with nuclear specs. Since it sounds like he used to make medical parts in a job shop type place I may know where he works or he may have made stuff for us in the past when we get busy we outsource all over the Michigan area.

yeah castings/forgings are hard on tooling. interrupted cuts and density variations along with vibration.

M1a65
12-05-2012, 04:15
Aircraft parts are made to very tight spec's and tolerences, then they go thru a battery of inspection, NDT (non destructive testing) and operational checks long before the general public boards the aircraft. Systems are triple redundant or better (like having 3 different braking systems for your car). Makes it pretty safe. Other than the hassle getting past TSA flying is much safer than a road trip to the grocery store! I should know, I work for Delta and I'm the guy doing the inspection & preflight testing the aircraft before you get on!

M1a65
12-05-2012, 04:20
Oh, and for Paul J, our last crash was in 1985 due to windshear. They have since developed technology to give advanced warning of that situation that wasn't around back in 1985. Bet you've had more accidents than my airline since then!

nmk
12-05-2012, 07:55
Oh, and for Paul J, our last crash was in 1985 due to windshear. They have since developed technology to give advanced warning of that situation that wasn't around back in 1985. Bet you've had more accidents than my airline since then!

http://www.muzakblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/Oh-Snap.jpg

Oh snap!

David N.
12-05-2012, 17:50
Oh, and for Paul J, our last crash was in 1985 due to windshear.

http://www.airdisaster.com/cgi-bin/view_details.cgi?date=08311988&reg=N473DA&airline=Delta+Air+Lines

http://www.airdisaster.com/cgi-bin/view_details.cgi?date=07061996&reg=N927DA&airline=Delta+Air+Lines

http://www.airdisaster.com/cgi-bin/view_details.cgi?date=10191996&reg=N914DL&airline=Delta+Air+Lines


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