Question on range etiquette [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : Question on range etiquette


Phantom465
12-05-2012, 15:04
So I was thinking about this last time I was at the range. When Iím done shooting, I leave my empty brass on the floor. I do not reload. I figure that there will be someone who comes after me who does reload, and would be happy to get some free brass.

Just wondering what everyone else does. Do you sweep it up? Leave it behind for the next shooter?

wvtarheel
12-05-2012, 15:06
Our local range (outdoor) the ground is so covered in brass it doesn't seem like a big deal at this point. I don't reload either so we let ours hit the ground and stay there.

glockfanbob
12-05-2012, 15:06
Sweep it up and put it in the bin with the rest of them. I SHOULD just keep them for when I start to reload innthe future but I don't .

Phaze5ive
12-05-2012, 15:08
I sweep it just because I think brass everywhere on the ground could be a potential hazard. If nothing, I just don't like leaving my area a mess after I'm done.

concretefuzzynuts
12-05-2012, 15:10
Range rules where I shoot is clean up your own mess.

USMCsilver
12-05-2012, 15:15
Range rules where I shoot is clean up your own mess.

The one indoor range I visit asks to clean it up, too.

BradD
12-05-2012, 15:19
Leave the place at least as clean as it was when I get there. If I wanted people to have a shot at the brass, I'd put it in a can and sit it in the corner or on a table.

Edit: at every range I've used, the rule was to clean up.

Cream Soda Kid
12-05-2012, 15:19
Range rules where I shoot is clean up your own mess.

Same rules apply at my range. It's a safety thing. Brass can be slippery when stepped on.

k9medic
12-05-2012, 15:19
The range I go to asks you to leave it there on the floor. They collect it and reload and sell the reloads to make a small profit for the range.

There's no cost to use this range and the people who do the reloading do it voluntarily.


Posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire (http://www.outdoorhub.com/mobile/)

TK-421
12-05-2012, 15:21
My range is outdoors and says that once it hits the ground, it's there's, and you're to leave it alone, unless you marked it or know for sure it's your's. You're not allowed to pick up any brass that doesn't belong to you, but you're free to leave it where it lies if you want. They say they pick up brass and sell it, to help make money for the range. But I think that's a load of bull. The place is so littered with brass that I wouldn't be surprised if they haven't picked up a single piece of brass in the last five years or so.

I personally just leave it alone because it's covered, so the brass hits the roof and flies everywhere, it would be a pain in the butt to try and find every piece of brass. And laying a tarp down isn't an option, because the brass flies everywhere. The only way to police your brass would be to get one of those catchers that attaches to the frame and directly covers the ejection port, so that it goes immediately into the catcher, instead of flying through the air.

stolenphot0
12-05-2012, 15:27
If I am lucky enough to be the only one there or can get far enough away, I pick mine up and keep it. Last time I was there my 27 was throwing brass so far away that it was in another guys area, so I packed up and left.

My other range sweeps as people shoot.

Andy W
12-05-2012, 15:34
The outdoor range I sometimes go to doesn't allow you to pick up brass or even "bend down" on his range. Do it, and an employee will yell at you to stop. Keep doing it and you'll probably get thrown out. It's obstensibly for safety reasons but the real reason is probably because the owner wants to keep the brass and reload it. The other day I had to pay $18 for a box of S&B 9mm from this range because I ran out of ammo and still wanted to shoot. That's ridiculous. I paid it though so I can't ***** too much. If I buy his overpriced ammo I should at least be able to collect the brass if I want. When I bought the ammo, I paid for the cases too, Not just the powder, bullets and primers lol. That would be an interesting small claims court case.

hogfish
12-05-2012, 15:55
Sweep it up, unless there's a sign that says not to. :grouphug:

RonS
12-05-2012, 15:57
I buy cleaned Rem 9mm brass for $15 for 250 and clean up every one of my cases I can find. I'm grateful for people who leave brass on the ground, I picked up nearly a full 50 rounds of Speer .45 ACP during the summer after a guy with a new Kimber left his. It is all cleaned and reloaded and sitting in the bottom of the range box now.

bigchuck83
12-05-2012, 16:01
range i go to has containers, broom and dustpan to sweep up brass. most people don't clean up after themselves. Everytime i am there i do my best to pick up all my brass and place it in the proper bucket.

TK-421
12-05-2012, 16:19
The outdoor range I sometimes go to doesn't allow you to pick up brass or even "bend down" on his range. Do it, and an employee will yell at you to stop. Keep doing it and you'll probably get thrown out. It's obstensibly for safety reasons but the real reason is probably because the owner wants to keep the brass and reload it. The other day I had to pay $18 for a box of S&B 9mm from this range because I ran out of ammo and still wanted to shoot. That's ridiculous. I paid it though so I can't ***** too much. If I buy his overpriced ammo I should at least be able to collect the brass if I want. When I bought the ammo, I paid for the cases too, Not just the powder, bullets and primers lol. That would be an interesting small claims court case.


Would they complain if you put one of those brass catchers on your firearm that catch the brass a net as soon as it leaves the chamber?

Halojumper
12-05-2012, 16:24
The rule at both clubs I belong to is clean up your own brass. However, when I shoot at a commercial range, I either pick it up for myself or just leave it on the floor for them. The place I was at last has you just keep kicking it out in front of the firing line. I assume the staff collects it after they close.

Andy W
12-05-2012, 16:33
Would they complain if you put one of those brass catchers on your firearm that catch the brass a net as soon as it leaves the chamber?

I have no idea. By the way I don't think I would actually take him to small claims court over it but it's funny to think about. If I were rich and had nothing to do, maybe but I'm soon to be a grad student so I don't have time for that stuff, not to mention money. :tongueout:

rednoved
12-05-2012, 16:34
It depends on the range I go to. One range has brooms and dustpans to sweep up the brass. Another range I go to wants you to leave the brass on the ground so they can collect it. You are allowed to keep yours, but you aren't supposed to pick up brass that isn't yours.

Andy W
12-05-2012, 16:36
The gun club/indoor range my dad and I were members of expected you to sweep up your own brass and either take it home or throw it in the brass barrel. You also periodically swept the range area if you were the only one there and it needed it. It was a pretty cool place. Members also volunteered to do maintenance and renovations on the building to keep costs down.

WarCry
12-05-2012, 16:36
I go to an outdoor range, and it depends on the range there I'm using. If I'm shooting off of a deck or built-up platform, I'll clean it off. If it's an "open" range, it's going into dirt or gravel, so I don't bother.

One thing they do there is they let local Boy Scouts come out and collect the brass, not for reloading, but to take in for recycling as a way of fund-raising. Gotta like the 'giving back' aspect of that.

HollowHead
12-05-2012, 16:50
I pick up out in the desert (I hate littering) and the one indoor I go to has a take or sweep policy. HH

TK-421
12-05-2012, 16:54
I have no idea. By the way I don't think I would actually take him to small claims court over it but it's funny to think about. If I were rich and had nothing to do, maybe but I'm soon to be a grad student so I don't have time for that stuff, not to mention money. :tongueout:

I didn't think you'd actually take him to small claims court, it was just one of those "What if" ideas that seem totally stupid in retrospect, but funny to mention and laugh about. I have those kinds of ideas too. They're fun to think about, and plan out, but would never actually work. :rofl:

I'm thinking I will get one of those brass catching nets that attach to the frame, once I have the money for a mass order of like 1,000 rounds of ammo. Might as well start saving it, I do plan on reloading at some point. Not really to save money or anything, but just so I can look at my ammunition and say "Yeah, I made that."

PBR Sailor
12-05-2012, 16:56
Picking up after yourself is good etiquette. When I shoot 100 rounds, I pick up at least 110 brass. I encourage others at my gun club to do the same. If we all do this, eventually the range will be clean. You can always give the brass to someone later if you don't reload.

LuvDog
12-05-2012, 17:04
It depends on the range but I prefer to sweep up after I'm done and keep it. I don't reload yet, but I plan too.

larry_minn
12-05-2012, 17:26
Just from OP. You have good start. ASK. When you get to range look over range rules, ask questions.
Most ranges you pick up your brass. I HAVE been at ranges where they consider any brass that hits floor as THEIRS. (those I recall also require you shoot THEIR ammo)
I was at one that didn't allow you to sweep up brass (lead concerns)\
Norm is pick up your brass, sweep it in pile/pan/bucket, unless fellow shooter asks if they can h ave it.

mr00jimbo
12-05-2012, 17:56
You should get a really fine tuned extractor and put a bucket to your 4 O'clock and make all your brass land in it.

concretefuzzynuts
12-05-2012, 18:00
You should get a really fine tuned extractor and put a bucket to your 4 O'clock and make all your brass land in it.

I can set a bucket at 4 O'clock at 15 fee away with my Mini 14 and hit the bucket from a bench rest shot, 100% on the time.

Rifle dependability.

Benton
12-05-2012, 18:05
You are so right! Someone will be happy to get your brass for reloading! The local range wants you to clean up after yourself but, it's not enforced. I always collect up my center fire brass because it's mine, i paid for it, and i will be reloading someday. I would personally not shoot at a range that had a rediculous rule that you couldn't collect your own brass.

elsolo
12-05-2012, 20:06
Usually, the range specifies THEIR policy on brass, and it varies.

Indoor ranges want you to sweep it forward of the firing line so they can collect it and sell it to the commercial reloading firms.

Outdoor ranges with concrete and benches often provide brooms and buckets for you to clean up your brass so they can sell it.

I have never been to a range that didn't allow me to pick up my own brass. I had some idiot RO try to stop me once, then I showed him all the caseheads were marked with a Sharpie and asked if the mags that hit the ground were now range property as well.

jtmac
12-05-2012, 20:16
The last indoor range I went to provided a broom, dustpan, and bucket. You were welcome to leave the brass there if you so chose...

The last outdoor range had nothing posted, but it was littered with trash--half of it non-reloadable.. I'd like to find everyone that didn't pick up their cases and beat them.

ArtificialGrape
12-05-2012, 20:21
At my indoor club the policy is to clean up your brass. I haven't started reloading, but I have been collecting my brass for awhile. Before that I just swept it forward of the line.

-ArtificialGrape

jrd22
12-05-2012, 20:29
I've never been to a range so I was wondering about this ( thinking about joining a club on the neighbor island). I pick up when I'm done shooting up at the old dump, cause I don't want it to look like... a dump.

sappy13
12-05-2012, 20:34
I tend to clean up my brass when I shoot at my gf parents house. The local indoor range has a rule that you leave it. The outdoor range i frequented where i used to live was the same way. The outdoor ranged sold their own reloads though, so it made sense there.

R*E
12-05-2012, 20:51
Shoot a revolver and you don't have to worry about picking up or not. :cool:

WarCry
12-05-2012, 21:17
Shoot a revolver and you don't have to worry about picking up or not. :cool:

No thanks, I already use enough of my range-time reloading.

Lone_Wolfe
12-05-2012, 21:36
Range rules where I shoot is clean up your own mess.

A range I used to go to wanted you to leave brass, but allowed you to pick up your own. Another that I went to one time would sweep around you while you were shooting. That was too damn distracting, I left and never went back.

Kloogee
12-05-2012, 21:40
One of our local indoor ranges won't allow you to pick up anything once it hits the floor. I rarely go there any more, but when I do, I use some of my cheap, Russian steel ammo.

Anywhere else, I pick up anything I shoot and whatever goodies others have left laying around. I don't reload yet, but if I do get into it, I'll have plenty to go with. Otherwise I'll sell the used brass and recoup a small portion of my ammo costs. Win-win either way.


Posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire (http://www.outdoorhub.com/mobile/)

686Owner
12-05-2012, 22:51
My brass tends to bounce everywhere, but I try to clean up my area. I don't want to sweep anyone else's brass up in case they reload.

gwalchmai
12-06-2012, 06:22
So I was thinking about this last time I was at the range. When Iím done shooting, I leave my empty brass on the floor. I do not reload. I figure that there will be someone who comes after me who does reload, and would be happy to get some free brass.

Just wondering what everyone else does. Do you sweep it up? Leave it behind for the next shooter?That is the correct etiquette. Some ranges want to scarf ALL the brass. Those ranges should be avoided.

gwalchmai
12-06-2012, 06:29
When I see folks shooting new ammo and not picking up their brass I ask if they mind me taking it, then sweep up after they're done. It usually results in smiles all around and a discussion of how to get started reloading.

Some of those nazi ranges you guys mention need to go out of business. ;)

elsolo
12-06-2012, 10:49
When I see folks shooting new ammo and not picking up their brass I ask if they mind me taking it, then sweep up after they're done. It usually results in smiles all around and a discussion of how to get started reloading.

Some of those nazi ranges you guys mention need to go out of business. ;)
+1

I have never been turned down when asking the shooter next to me if he minds if I pick up his brass for reloading.

Often starts a conversation and "want to try this gun?"

Glockz0r
12-06-2012, 11:43
I shoot steel cased ammo out of most of my guns so I have little incentive in keeping it. The range rules in my area are police your brass with a broom and dustpan.

Psychman
12-06-2012, 13:33
I pick it up and put it in my brass bag for later reloading. Brass is expensive!!

cola490
12-06-2012, 13:41
The rule at my range is to sweep any brass in your area in front of the shooting bench.

DWARREN123
12-06-2012, 14:04
I police my brass because I do reload. I sweep up anything left on the floor because I believe it is a fall hazard. :supergrin:

Jason D
12-06-2012, 19:27
What's mine is mine and will remain mine until I deem it necessary to junk it.

Halojumper
12-07-2012, 16:22
The rule at my range is to sweep any brass in your area in front of the shooting bench.

I hope that's after they call a cease fire! :)

Glock20 10mm
12-07-2012, 16:36
You make the mess you clean the mess.

Veedubklown
12-08-2012, 08:12
I sweep it just because I think brass everywhere on the ground could be a potential hazard. If nothing, I just don't like leaving my area a mess after I'm done.

This is what I do. On the concrete firing line of my outdoor range, I'll scoop up my brass and put it in their bucket, or my saved brass pile. Casings everywhere can be like stepping on marbles.

Out in the dirt, I scoop up my brass if the area is clean. If it's already filled will steel casings everywhere, and I'm shootin 22 or steel casings, I'm not too concerned.

Some ranges have it posted, to not pick up brass (or to be sure and pick up your brass). Some say it's a safety hazard having brass buzzards all over the firing line, others reload it and sell it as range ammo.