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Averageman
12-05-2012, 17:33
My Son is interested in a Career.
I have done the search just interested in your experiances.
Thanks
A/M

*ASH*
12-05-2012, 17:40
only experiences ive had is bad ones, i only see them when someone in my family dies

i know one thing i had no idea the schooling and medical school stuff one has to go thru .


long ago i dated a girl ,her dad ran a funeral home , they lived upstairs , always creeped me out , still does . and i feel bad for that one time we made the two - back beast in one of his coffins :embarassed::embarassed:

debbert
12-05-2012, 17:41
Many years ago, I thought about going into the mortuary business. During my investigation, I found out that between the schooling (the same courses as doctors take), plus the apprenticeships, etc... it took just as long to become a mortician, to take care of the dead, as it did to become a doctor, to take care of the living.

I didn't think that that was right, so I never pursued it after that. Sometimes I wished that I would have, as it is a job that has pretty good security. People are always dying to do business with you.

jp3975
12-05-2012, 17:43
My Son is interested in a Career.
I have done the search just interested in your experiances.
Thanks
A/M

Id advise him to become a nurse instead. If he becomes an RN, he can do the traveling nurse thing. Up to $100 an hour. Ive seen small towns do $50 an hour, 7 days on and 7 off.

There's not much money in that field unless you own your own funeral home.

Depending on where you live, average pay is 30k and its an Associate degree.

Its an interesting job. But he probably wont have a lot of extra cash doing it.

Rabbi
12-05-2012, 17:44
It seems like most everyone in the industry is a salesman (prepaid funeral and when it happens) Some of them seem to do rather well. like the 80-120K lifestyle.

I would assume, given that there are not really very many funeral homes per capita, that being the actual guy in charge of any given location (The Director) is probably a pretty hard job to come by. I would also bet it is a 6 figure job in most cases.

As for the people who actually prep the bodies, perhaps there is some room there...but again, it seems like most everyone in that industry (and it stands to reason) is a salesman, no matter what title they use.

jp3975
12-05-2012, 17:45
Many years ago, I thought about going into the mortuary business. During my investigation, I found out that between the schooling (the same courses as doctors take), plus the apprenticeships, etc... it took just as long to become a mortician, to take care of the dead, as it did to become a doctor, to take care of the living.

I didn't think that that was right, so I never pursued it after that. Sometimes I wished that I would have, as it is a job that has pretty good security. People are always dying to do business with you.

Its an associate degree plus two year apprenticeship which is paid.

If he started working at a funeral home while in school he would be working on his apprenticeship while in school. So you could become a mortician in as little as 2 years if you work hard.

Rabbi
12-05-2012, 17:49
During my investigation, I found out that between the schooling (the same courses as doctors take), plus the apprenticeships, etc... it took just as long to become a mortician, to take care of the dead, as it did to become a doctor, to take care of the living.

I find that highly implausible.

It take 8 years to even get the MD/DO title, then it takes another 3-7 to become a "type" of doctor and another 1-3 years after that if you wish to subspecialize. All of this and you have not even taken your board certification(s) yet....and much of this, every week, for years is over 80 hours. So it is double the training years.

So, for Doctors, 12 years minimum...for most longer. A real quick googling shows that State requirments for Morticians very but in most places a bachelor’s degree is more than enough.

debbert
12-05-2012, 17:50
Its an associate degree plus two year apprenticeship which is paid.

That may be true, now. Back in the day, it added up to about 8 years when you factored in the schooling and the apprenticeships. I don't know if this changes anything but I was considering the job of the guy that handled the bodies and did the makeup and such... I wasn't looking at the front office position.

SPIN2010
12-05-2012, 17:53
I would steer him waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay clear of that profession, as it is pretty hard to make a living off of "$500.00" cremations as in ground burial disappears completely.

Its an associate degree plus two year apprenticeship which is paid.

Only for the Mortuary Technician side (embalming), Funeral Director is a BS degree in most states now (... but there are several that do not even require a degree i.e. CO)

P.S. With mortuary school and PA (Phys Asst) school I was looking at five years max down at UK (but I had two other degrees to use as credit enhancers). I am sure it is about two years more without college credit to apply.

debbert
12-05-2012, 17:53
I find that highly implausible.

It take 8 years to even get the MD/DO title, then it takes another 3-7 to become a "type" of doctor and another 1-3 years after that if you wish to subspecialize. All of this and you have not even taken your board certification(s) yet....and much of this, every week, for years is over 80 hours. So it is double the training years.

So, for Doctors, 12 years minimum...for most longer. A real quick googling shows that State requirments for Morticians very but in most places a bachelorís degree is more than enough.

Here ya go: http://www.ehow.com/how_10074171_become-mortician-ohio.html

Rabbi
12-05-2012, 18:00
Here ya go: http://www.ehow.com/how_10074171_become-mortician-ohio.html

So my thoughts were right, it is not near as long as becoming a doctor. It takes 5 years (4 year degree + 1 year certificate program) Then you have up to 18 months to complete an apprenticeship.

Again, to be a Medical Doctor

8 years of school.

If you get to count the apprenticeship, doctors get to count post graduate training.

3-7 years residency (80+ hours a week, so that is 6-14 years of training hours)

1-3 years fellowship (again 80 or more hours a week in most cases)

Then your boards.

There are few professions that require as long a training process as becoming a board certified doctor in the U.S.

You also picked a State (Ohio) with some of the longest requirments, most have less. Doctors have the same training requirments in every State.

debbert
12-05-2012, 18:06
So my thoughts were right, it is not near as long as becoming a doctor. It takes 5 years (4 year degree + 1 year certificate program) Then you have up to 18 months to complete an apprenticeship.

Again, to be a Medical Doctor

8 years of school.

If you get to count the apprenticeship, doctors get to count post graduate training.

3-7 years residency (80+ hours a week, so that is 6-14 years of training hours)

1-3 years fellowship (again 80 or more hours a week in most cases)

Then your boards.

There are few professions that require as long a training process as becoming a board certified doctor in the U.S.

I did not post this to cause a debate. I also want to point out that when I was considering this, it was almost 30 years ago. Things have definitely changed since then.

Perhaps I should have said "almost as many years as a doctor."

I also picked Ohio because I am a lifelong resident of Ohio.

jp3975
12-05-2012, 18:06
That may be true, now. Back in the day, it added up to about 8 years when you factored in the schooling and the apprenticeships. I don't know if this changes anything but I was considering the job of the guy that handled the bodies and did the makeup and such... I wasn't looking at the front office position.

You get schooled for both funeral director and embalmer. Although some people choose not to take the embalming courses and just want to direct.

I went to school for it 07-09.

I cant imagine it ever took that long. Really, you could learn to do it easily without ever going to school. In fact, you dont have to go to school in one state. I think its CO if i recall correctly.

All that it really is, is basics like comp, algebra, speech, etc, and Anatomy I/II, thanatochemistry, microbiology/pathology, embalming, funeral history, psyc, sociology, etc.

I dont think theres any way to stretch it that long.

Rabbi
12-05-2012, 18:09
I did not post this to cause a debate. I also want to point out that when I was considering this, it was almost 30 years ago. Things have definitely changed since then.

Perhaps I should have said "almost as many years as a doctor."

I also picked Ohio because I am a lifelong resident of Ohio.

I still dont see how 6.5 years( at the most) is almost 11 years (at the very least)

Dubble-Tapper
12-05-2012, 18:11
he wants to be a mortician? have any neighborhood pets come up missing lately?

just kidding, that was mean.


honestly, my best friend dad was a funeral director/mortician when we were growing up. he ran the whole operation, pick up, prep, embalming, cremation, sales, family grief counseling, all that.

he made good money, but that career caused him many issues with depression and it really changed the dude. you have to be a certain type of person to deal with death for a living.

jp3975
12-05-2012, 18:13
Only for the Mortuary Technician side (embalming), Funeral Director is a BS degree in most states now (... but there are several that do not even require a degree i.e. CO)

P.S. With mortuary school and PA (Phys Asst) school I was looking at five years max down at UK (but I had two other degrees to use as credit enhancers). I am sure it is about two years more without college credit to apply.

Not around here. 2 year course and you're qualified to be an embalmer/funeral director.

I cant fathom why director is a bs. Different states i guess.

Mine was in AR and i could take a simple board exam to be qualified in LA or TX. Its a two year degree in all three states.

debbert
12-05-2012, 18:16
In any event, I wish your son the best with whatever decision he makes, averageman. Regardless of the number of years for schooling and apprenticeships (30 years ago), I couldn't reconcile the amount of schooling that it took to prepare dead people for a funeral with the amount of schooling that it took to take care of living people. At the time, it was a considerable choice for me, regardless of how Rabbi wants to dissect it.

At times, I regret that I didn't go through with it.

The funeral business these days is a conglomerate. Very few, if any independent funeral directors or funeral home businesses exist anymore. You son should take that into consideration as well.

DaneA
12-05-2012, 18:21
I would support him fully if I were you. People will be dying to see him after he gets out of school. Although it seems to me that business would always be dead. Tough choice.

jp3975
12-05-2012, 18:25
To the op...

Since there is disagreement here as to how long it takes...google "funeral program [your state]" and then call them and ask.

Takes two years in LA/AR/TX.

I would advise him to chose another field though, as there isnt much money in it if you work for someone else. If he wants to own a place...you can become rich doing that, but its a lot of work and money to get there.

debbert
12-05-2012, 18:27
To the op...

Since there is disagreement here as to how long it takes...google "funeral program [your state]" and then call them and ask.

Takes two years in LA/AR/TX.

I would advise him to chose another field though, as there isnt much money in it if you work for someone else. If he wants to own a place...you can become rich doing that, but its a lot of work and money to get there.

:agree:

robin303
12-05-2012, 18:31
Look at the bright side. You will never run out of work.

elsolo
12-05-2012, 18:41
It seems like most everyone in the industry is a salesman (prepaid funeral and when it happens) Some of them seem to do rather well. like the 80-120K lifestyle.

I would assume, given that there are not really very many funeral homes per capita, that being the actual guy in charge of any given location (The Director) is probably a pretty hard job to come by. I would also bet it is a 6 figure job in most cases.

As for the people who actually prep the bodies, perhaps there is some room there...but again, it seems like most everyone in that industry (and it stands to reason) is a salesman, no matter what title they use.

"Casket salesman" is how my friend's father describes being the second generation owner of the funeral home.

He encouraged one son to pursue more challenging interests, he became a physicist.

The other son gets to inherit the family business, eventually.
That part of the industry is apparently difficult to get into.

vikingsoftpaw
12-05-2012, 19:05
My Son is interested in a Career.
I have done the search just interested in your experiances.
Thanks
A/M


If he wants to make it a career, tell him to seek a Bachelors Degree in Mortuary Science.

Jade Falcon
12-05-2012, 20:18
My Son is interested in a Career.
I have done the search just interested in your experiances.
Thanks
A/M

Based on my knowlege (little), most Funeral Homes require you to have a Degree in Mortuary Sciences, so prepare him for some 2 or 4 years of college.

Jade Falcon
12-05-2012, 20:26
Does your son look like this, by any chance:

http://www.google.com/url?source=imglanding&ct=img&q=http://www.notinhalloffame.com/UserFiles/Image/article_images/WWE/Paul%20Bearer.jpg&sa=X&ei=hg_AULrSO-vliwKsi4G4DA&ved=0CAsQ8wc&usg=AFQjCNEKXB7yCcu4WrDH6YTc_asip4gDKw

http://www.wrestling18.com/images/55/paul-bearer-86.jpg

http://www.wrestling18.com/images/55/paul-bearer-109.jpg

:rofl:

airmotive
12-05-2012, 20:27
I did not post this to cause a debate. I also want to point out that when I was considering this, it was almost 30 years ago. Things have definitely changed since then.

Perhaps I should have said "almost as many years as a doctor."

I also picked Ohio because I am a lifelong resident of Ohio.

I think you're thinking of an ME (medical examine and/or coroner) which is an MD if I recall correctly. That's often confused with a mortician. Different hats.

md2lgyk
12-06-2012, 07:52
My son-in-law is a funeral director. He did a lot of research on career fields while still in high school and chose that because he figured he'd always have a job. So far he always has, though there is a LOT of training and certifications involved. But he's only in his mid-30s, and makes probably $150K.

Glockgeezer
12-06-2012, 07:57
No repeat customers, only referrals !

certifiedfunds
12-06-2012, 08:10
Many years ago, I thought about going into the mortuary business. During my investigation, I found out that between the schooling (the same courses as doctors take), plus the apprenticeships, etc... it took just as long to become a mortician, to take care of the dead, as it did to become a doctor, to take care of the living.

I didn't think that that was right, so I never pursued it after that. Sometimes I wished that I would have, as it is a job that has pretty good security. People are always dying to do business with you.

:rofl: No

My FIL is a funeral director. He has an unrelated masters degree and did like a 1 year JUCO program to get licensed to embalm and stuff.

I can't imagine why people want those jobs but everyone is different.

certifiedfunds
12-06-2012, 08:12
I think you're thinking of an ME (medical examine and/or coroner) which is an MD if I recall correctly. That's often confused with a mortician. Different hats.

I have a friend who is an ME. She has an undergrad and masters in biology I believe.

DreamWeaver88
12-06-2012, 08:26
I would steer him waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay clear of that profession, as it is pretty hard to make a living off of "$500.00" cremations as in ground burial disappears completely.





If you add in a memorial visitation day, you'll be in the neighborhood of 4 or 5k +. There's money to be made.

gwalchmai
12-06-2012, 08:34
I did not post this to cause a debate. I also want to point out that when I was considering this, it was almost 30 years ago. Things have definitely changed since then. Yeah, sounds like you made an innocent statement. But then, this IS GnG, and no such thing goes unpunished... ;)

SPIN2010
12-06-2012, 08:49
If you add in a memorial visitation day, you'll be in the neighborhood of 4 or 5k +. There's money to be made.


LOL! Many think that ... ever been sued? If you are a funeral director you will be soon. :wow:

4-5K for a burial with options! Nobody will pay it unless in the heart of the southland ... call your local funeral home (that is not a legacy home in a small town) and see what business is like, you will be amazed.

Cremations are the order of the day, give Baxter or Cincinnati College of Mortuary Science a call and see what they have to say (CCMS has about shut the doors, I live just down the way from them).

Unless you are a legacy funeral home owner or in with SCI (or a big corp.) you ain't making that kinda cash off a funeral home (unless you are busting ass with preneed). But I doubt preneed is making that kinda steam, it has been effectively destroyed with all the foreign owned preneed schemes over the past ten years. I believe the issue in GA broke preneeds back without doubt.

LOL! The cemetarians make more money than a funeral director and they do not get sued as often.

SPIN2010
12-06-2012, 08:54
Not around here. 2 year course and you're qualified to be an embalmer/funeral director.

I cant fathom why director is a bs. Different states i guess.

Mine was in AR and i could take a simple board exam to be qualified in LA or TX. Its a two year degree in all three states.

Note: FOR OHIO!

http://codes.ohio.gov/oac/4717-1-12

byf43
12-06-2012, 09:12
I would steer him waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay clear of that profession, as it is pretty hard to make a living off of "$500.00" cremations as in ground burial disappears completely.


Only for the Mortuary Technician side (embalming), Funeral Director is a BS degree in most states now (... but there are several that do not even require a degree i.e. CO)

P.S. With mortuary school and PA (Phys Asst) school I was looking at five years max down at UK (but I had two other degrees to use as credit enhancers). I am sure it is about two years more without college credit to apply.





$500.00 cremations????
Not around here.
Minimum fee is $2,495.00 (cardboard box container).
Oak container (IF memory serves me) STARTS at $6,000.00.
The REAL $$$ is in financing the cremation.
1.5%/month, and must be paid off within 1 year, otherwise, interest rate goes to 3.5%/month.


Kinda lucrative.

Then, you have the cost of the urn, which can get ridiculously high.

Just think, being a mortician, you'll never have a customer walk out, on you.

WT
12-06-2012, 09:47
Locally we have an embalming factory. About 36 tables. In and out in 90 minutes. The hearse drops off the customer at one door, drives around back to another door, picks up the finished product, and off they go. In between the driver gets the hearse washed, has a coffee and donut, etc.

The local funeral homes don't do much embalming anymore.

sarge83
12-06-2012, 11:57
In many situations it depends on the laws of the state you are located in. In Kentucky you can become a director through an apprenticeship usually six months to a year. You can't embalm-legally or own a funeral home with just a directors license in Kentucky. In Kentucky you have to have the embalmers degree and pass the national and state boards in order to own a funeral home. Many owners will give an employee with the embalmers licensing and certification 1% of the company to get around the law in Kentucky.

To get your directors and embalmers license/degree you are talking about 2-3yrs. depending on your state's requirements.

I have a relative in the funeral business and cremations are becoming more and more prevalent as previously posted. I know people who got their embalmers license and all they do is embalm as a sub-contractor for multiple funeral homes. You get a call to embalm, you drive to the funeral home, embalm the body and at the end of the month send the funeral home a bill.

You can make a living in the mortuary business and if you own the business a comfortable living.

thanospro
12-06-2012, 22:28
In TN, a minimum of an associates degree in mortuary science is required. A few schools offer a 4 year degree but it doesn't pay any different unless you're looking to work your way up the management ladder with a corporation. The anatomy, microbiology, and chemistry is pretty intense but everything else is pretty standard for any area of study. Don't look to get rich. Most funeral homes have a crazy call schedule and high burn out rate, especially corporations like SCI. The 2 year apprenticeship that most states require will usually weed out those that didnt know what they were getting in to. As an apprentice expect an average of 30k or so. After that it should go up unless a corporation is writing the check. The average dual licensed undertaker makes around 45k. Management has a different pay scale. The schedule is the big factor here. Some guys work their asses off 60+ hours a week for that. Some guys less than 50. If you're looking to make some decent money, go into the pre need sales side of it. Stay away from corporate firms though because at some point you won't be able to meet their goal, they'll just hire a new guy and he'll sell to all his family friends and neighbors..rinse/repeat. I know several pre need insurance guys in the 6 figure bracket. I can't think of anybody on the actual undertaker side that make quite that much unless their name is on the sign out front. I make funeral arrangements and embalm bodies. I get paid whether I'm pickling, burying or taking a nap. Life is good for me except those late night calls. Then I wonder why I got in the business in the first place. Been doing this 15 years. I've seen and smelled bodies at every stage of death of all ages. In the end, its the families that are the most difficult to deal with.

scwine
12-06-2012, 22:35
1st rent the movie "Bernie", true story out of Carthage, TX...
Bernie - Official Trailer [HD] Jack Black Movie - YouTube

The real "Bernie".. Bernie Tiede: the killer inside him - YouTube

I know one funeral director who was a "friend". Let's just say he is very different. I no longer associate with him. But I will say the above reminds me so much of him. Even looks and talks like him.

Averageman
12-07-2012, 05:43
Okay well lots of answers.
Look like we will go talk to a couple of folks here in town "In the business" and see what's up.
I can't imagine wanting to do this myself; but..
Some research did show me that you can walk out of school making 50-70K a year.

Ralff
12-07-2012, 06:05
I've thought about this myself. I've performed at hundreds of funerals and hung out at plenty of funeral homes before said events, so I have a pretty good idea of what goes on and grief stricken families don't bother me.

Unfortunately, the funeral director is usually the one that also prepares the bodies. I just don't think I could handle it. One of the directors at a fuenral home we visit takes some strange delight in telling me stories of working on mangled bodies.

snappy
12-07-2012, 06:40
It's a great career, people are dying to get in!

texasglong
12-07-2012, 08:30
It is my experience that a Funeral Director is the last person in the world to let you down, but business is always dead.

Krav Maglock
12-07-2012, 10:18
I've been an Embalmer for 18 yrs now and I like what I do. It can be a very rewarding Profession if your in it for the right reasons. Alot of kids who think they want to do this change their minds once they are faced with the realities of the job. I have seen Mortuary Science students pass out many times. If your son wants to check it out before school some funeral homes will hire you to work funerals run death certificates and even help out in the prep room, just to see if it is really something he wants to do. As far as pay, it depends on where you live. I make almost $30.00 hr and have alot of down time to do whatever.(like type this response) Sometimes when we are really slow we even go to the local shooting range..


Certified Glock Armorer

FullClip
12-07-2012, 11:55
Doubt if I could deal with the job, but somebody has to do it.

If it were up to me, I'd open up a "Discount Cemetary" type deal. Use a 18" post hole digger, stuff them in the hole upright, and crowd them in like a "Standing Room Only" section. Figure I could plant a lot more stiffs per acre that way.:supergrin:

rppnj
12-07-2012, 12:21
My Son is interested in a Career.
I have done the search just interested in your experiances.
Thanks
A/M

Unless your son has the money to open his own funeral home or better still, buy out an older Funeral Director that's ready to retire, this is NOT, NOT, NOT a good career move. After the time and money invested to become a Licensed Funeral Director, in many instances, the owners treat not just their apprentices but also licensees like personal slaves. During 'downtime', they are expected to vacuum, dust, wash windows, wash cars, cut/edge/maintain the lawn & landscaping and just be an all around 'gofer'. Then, when business is busy, you're expected to be on call 24/7 and work day and night. Of course, you are still expected to keep up with your slave duties, also. This information comes directly from several friends ofmine who were once licensed funeral directors, who after working in the business for a few years, couldn't wait to get out, HAPPILY giving up the time and money lost obtaining their license just to get out. BTW...they pay 'peanuts' based on what it costs to obtain a license....definitely not enough to save the amount necessary to open up your own business.