How do you track the # times your brass has been loaded? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Kwesi
12-17-2012, 09:29
For semi auto pistol brass: Do you use a colored marker around the primer, put a mark on the case itself or what? Is the color removed when tumbled with Corn Cob? I have my 10mm brass in mind.

Hoser
12-17-2012, 09:53
Pistol brass? Dont track that stuff. I lose it long before it wearing out is a concern.

For long range rifle I just load up 500 rounds and use them for the life of the barrel. After a few thousand rounds the barrel is toast and the brass has been loaded 5-6 times at that point. New barrel = new brass.

fredj338
12-17-2012, 10:18
For rifle, I keep them in 60-100rd plastic boxes & write it on the lid. For handgun, I don't bother but for a 100 set aside for hunting guns like the scoped 44mag.

dhgeyer
12-17-2012, 11:38
Do you use a colored marker around the primer, put a mark on the case itself or what? Is the color removed when tumbled with Corn Cob?

I load and shoot by the box, 50 or 100 round batches. Every time I reload a batch I relabel the box with all pertinent information: Date, load data, brand of cases or mixed, and how many times the batch has been reloaded. It's not perfect, as I lose a case here and there, which I replace with once fired cases. This last only applies to semi-autos of course. I don't lose revolver cases. After the batch has been reloaded what I consider to be its life, I recycle the whole batch in buckets provided at my club.

unclebob
12-17-2012, 12:11
I have a bucket in the reloading room full of brass that I work out of. I go to the range and shoot X number of rounds. I take the brass and run them through Walnut media with dryer sheets. Those then go in the bucket by the tumblers. I keep doing this until all the brass in the bucket that is in the reloading room is empty. I then run the brass that is by the tumblers through corn cob media and 50/50 mixture of mineral spirits and Nu-Finish car polish. Those then go into the bucket in the reloading room and I start all over again. I do this 6 times then they go in a bucket for lost brass matches. I keep tack in my head but you could somehow mark the container or just put a note in the bucket. I loose every little brass other than the lost brass matches.
Rifle brass is like what Fred said.

Kwesi
12-17-2012, 12:25
Thanks. I edited the OP to state semi auto pistol brass (10mm).

Colorado4Wheel
12-17-2012, 13:17
I don't track pistol brass. Even full lower 10mm.

unclebob
12-17-2012, 13:28
If I didnít lose the brass in the lost brass matches. I still would do it the same way. But when I started to get a fair amount of split cases then I would get rid of that brass in those buckets and start over.

IndyGunFreak
12-17-2012, 14:11
Pistol brass... When it splits.. I've had it to long.. :)

Boxerglocker
12-17-2012, 14:27
Pistol brass never, load it till it spilts.

AR rifle, I mark the boxes 2nd, 3rd, etc. I keep those 2 gallon ice cream bins labeled as such. Once the fill up I load a batch of 500 or so. By the 4th firing. I usually leave it on the ground at a lost brass match.

PhantomF4E
12-17-2012, 14:42
Loading pistol brass. If it splits , you must quit .

Kwesi
12-17-2012, 15:03
I do load until that vertical split occurs. The reason I asked is because I've read some posts that limit top end loads to brass only fired x times.

brisk21
12-17-2012, 16:18
I can tell how many times my .45 has been loaded. There is an extractor mark on the rim of the case for every time it has been fired. I have some brass that has been loaded 5 or 6 times and it still works great!!!

fredj338
12-17-2012, 16:44
I do load until that vertical split occurs. The reason I asked is because I've read some posts that limit top end loads to brass only fired x times.

If you are going to run max loads in your 10mm, then I would sort by times fired. The brass is going to fail sooner than later.

SJ 40
12-17-2012, 18:29
Till the cases split or I don't like how the primer pocket feels as I'm priming the case,then it becomes scrap. SJ 40

dkf
12-17-2012, 19:16
Put a tally mark on the brass with a fine sharpie every time it is loaded and then wrap case several times with clear box tape to prevent the sharpie mark from being removed.:whistling:















I just shoot until it starts to look real rough and wore out and the rim has a excessive marks on it.:supergrin:

Colorado4Wheel
12-17-2012, 19:40
10mm load data is not really that high of pressure. Never had a split case cause me any issues. I never even notice it even.

norton
12-17-2012, 19:40
Pistol brass I don't bother counting.
Rifle brass, especially 30.06 goes into old kitty litter jugs. I have them marked as once fired, twice etc.
.223 I haven't been good about keeping track of firing cycles.
.17 Remington Center fire brass usually splits at the neck after two or three loads. It sort of eliminates itself.

jdavionic
12-17-2012, 19:47
I don't. Since I don't know if it's my brass or someone else's, I just ensure that I inspect each case.

Firecop203
12-17-2012, 21:17
I've never tried to keep track of how many times they've been loaded. I inspect before the next loading. It if doesn't pass the inspection, it goes into a scrap bucket.

Kwesi
12-17-2012, 21:25
I don't. Since I don't know if it's my brass or someone else's, I just ensure that I inspect each case.

If you loaded 10mm you wouldn't have that problem.

jmorris
12-18-2012, 07:59
I get my brass for free but have now idea of its history. Before it was delivered to me ready to go, I still used free range brass and didn't know the history then either.

kastiron
12-18-2012, 16:10
I shoot mostly 30-06 and cast bullets now. I don't track # of firings any longer, just inspect each loading.

One time at the range, I decided to load the same case until it failed to get an idea of what the life expectancy was. I ran out of bullets to load in the single case at 100 firings, and the case looked as good as it did when I started the test.

shotgunred
12-18-2012, 18:03
For pistol brass I have two 5 gallon buckets for each caliber, clean and dirty.

Taterhead
12-18-2012, 21:15
If you loaded 10mm you wouldn't have that problem.

Isn't that the truth. You almost never see 10mm brass at the range. All the 10mm auto shooters I know handload. It is too expensive to shoot factory. So if I find a piece of 10mm brass at the range, it is most assuredly mine. To your original question, I don't count times loaded for pistol brass. If going with a hot load, it gets new or once fired (by me) brass.

For bolt-action rifle, I keep brass in 50 count cases. They live together their whole life. I keep the empties and loaded rounds together until all 50 are shot. Then they are tumbled and re-loaded together with the same components and specs. Typically for what I am doing, 5 rounds and done. Then the old brass is replaced with 50 pieces of new brass.

oneofthose
12-21-2012, 13:13
I used to mark the base with different colored markers. Once the loaded rounds were nose down in the box, I'd lay a ruler along side one row at a time, using the ruler as a guide to draw a line (or 2) down each row until done. Now I don't bother keeping track of how many times it's been loaded.

Now I mark the bases with a color that identifies my favorite loads, so I can identify them more easily by sight. As an example, 165 gr 40sw gets a black line, 180 gr gets a red line.

Ferdinandd
12-21-2012, 22:12
I'd like to have started off separating brass and marking it, but I didn't. 25 years later, it may be too late to start. I reload .223, .357, 9mm, and .45 ACP. When cases split, I chuck them. I watch for overly stretched primer pockets and haven't noticed anything severe. Haven't had a problem yet.

Arby238
12-22-2012, 06:35
Till the cases split or I don't like how the primer pocket feels as I'm priming the case,then it becomes scrap. SJ 40
Same here.