My cat was mauled by a coyote(?) [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : My cat was mauled by a coyote(?)


Cooper
12-23-2012, 23:05
Let the cat out. An hour later she's back with half her lower jaw peeled off, bite marks around her ribcage and one paw de-gloved. $850 later the vet is supposedly patching her up. Breaks my heart to see her torn up like that.

I'm in a suburban neighborhood with no dogs. The vet said whatever got her was big enough to get its mouth around her whole body. We've been seeing coyotes in the field across the way, but they would have had to have ventured a couple hundred yards among the tight-knit houses to get up here. The cat doesn't stray very far.

Is that usual coyote behavior? What can be done. We're inside the city limits, so I can't shoot em.

Tango 1Zero
12-23-2012, 23:08
The coyotes will come to the door to snatch a cat if its hungry. She must have got in a good hit in to get away.

Gregg702
12-23-2012, 23:24
That is terrible, but terrible things happen to pets that are allowed to roam on their own, be it a coyote, getting hit by a car, or some other accident or predator. Keep your girl indoors, it is much better for her. I hope she heals up ok.

Cooper
12-23-2012, 23:38
She must have got in a good hit in to get away.

She's tough! She's actually a neighborhood cat (well, she WAS . . . after $850 she's ours now) that was here when we moved in, and she spends her days mooching off everybody and her nights mooching off us specifically. She has survived several incidents like this one (though none nearly as severe) as well as being hit by a car before we knew her.

She will be an indoor cat from now on. We have to protect our investment.

http://www.darktopography.com/images/blog2010/rosiefocus1.jpg

goldenlight
12-23-2012, 23:50
That is terrible, but terrible things happen to pets that are allowed to roam on their own, be it a coyote, getting hit by a car, or some other accident or predator. Keep your girl indoors, it is much better for her. I hope she heals up ok.

This.

Indoor cats live longer, with far fewer expensive visits to the vet.

All my cats have been indoor only cats, and they have lived from 15 to 18 years. I provide a perch where they can look out the window, and they like going out on my 3 season (fully enclosed, with storm windows) porch.

I'm sorry about your cat, but keeping her indoors from now on is really the only way to keep her safe. At least one coyote knows where she lives, now.

itisbruno
12-23-2012, 23:52
Sorry to read this, terrible news.

VinnieD
12-23-2012, 23:59
If you can't shoot them, you can keep coyotes away with firecrackers and/or an airgun. They're pretty cowardly, and tend to avoid areas where they meet resistance. Considering your cat managed to come back at all, tells me she put up one hell of a fight to get away, and probably put the fear of God into one of them.

I've been trying to deal with the ones around here, but they're pretty evasive, so I can't ever get a clear shot, but putting a round of buckshot over their heads tends to keep them away for a while. (I live in a rural area.) I'm sure a pellet in the backside would teach them a lesson.

GRIMLET
12-24-2012, 00:03
How would a high speed pellet gun do against them with a nice head shot?
Some of those things have good fps.

That might be ok inside city limits. Check first though.

bigchuck83
12-24-2012, 00:51
hope your cat heals well. Coyotes are a big problem.

Ohio Copper
12-24-2012, 01:06
.22lr with a can?

harlenm
12-24-2012, 01:42
This.

Indoor cats live longer, with far fewer expensive visits to the vet.

All my cats have been indoor only cats, and they have lived from 15 to 18 years. I provide a perch where they can look out the window, and they like going out on my 3 season (fully enclosed, with storm windows) porch.

I'm sorry about your cat, but keeping her indoors from now on is really the only way to keep her safe. At least one coyote knows where she lives, now.

Indoor cats are cheaper? I have 4 cats, 3 go outside. The indoor cat has had all but 3 of his teeth extracted due to gum disease and last year had a urinary tract blockage and spent 4 days in the emergency vet. Spent about $5500 on him over the 5 years we've had him.

Don't even take the other cats to the vet except for rabies shots every 3 years.

posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire (http://www.outdoorhub.com/mobile/)

roger123
12-24-2012, 04:32
Sorry to hear about the cat, we have 5. 4 rescues from off the street and one "store bought" (all indoors). Best of luck to you guys.

ltj9296
12-24-2012, 04:58
We lost our dog to coyotes last year. She was not a small dog, about 65 lbs. I was gone, but my neighbor saw it. He said it was 4 or 5, I hate I was gone when she needed my help.
Also a Raccoon can kill or injure a pet. My vet said he had to put a big Rottie down after a fight with a coon.
I am sorry about your cat, but I wish owners would not leave them outside. I have chickens and they will kill the chicks. I use to see cats all the time, but now only once in a while. I think the coyotes have killed most of the ones that stay outside around here.

GlockPride
12-24-2012, 05:18
Coyotes are very good at luring. Most people don't realize but yotes have something like 1700 different vocalizations. They will get a dog lured out by sounding like a female in distress or other means. Then 3-5 more will sneak in and all ambush the dog. No dog that I know of could fend off that many hungry coyotes without an intervention.
Cats are naturally curious and I'm sure the coyotes can make sounds that most cats would want to check out.
Good luck on getting her healed up.

amazon
12-24-2012, 05:23
Sorry to hear about your cat. Hope she heals up well. She's a tough kitty to say the least! Hope she has a tough girlie name like Xena Warrior Princess or something :-)

Bren
12-24-2012, 06:04
Is that usual coyote behavior? What can be done. We're inside the city limits, so I can't shoot em.

Yes, that is very usual. Cats are pretty much a food staple for suburban coyotes.

Bren
12-24-2012, 06:05
She will be an indoor cat from now on. We have to protect our investment.

http://www.darktopography.com/images/blog2010/rosiefocus1.jpg

I invested a couple of thousand into my formerly feral stray cat, when he got caught in a radiator fan, now he has his own room and hates going outside.

heyTJ
12-24-2012, 06:14
Sorry to hear about the kitty. I have indoor and outdoor cats.
They don't cross the line. The outdoor cats have a very important job, keep the barn and surrounding area rodent free.
All my outdoor cats are and will be rescue cats. They have a somewhat safe place to live and are fat and happy.
I don't bother taking them to the vet because they most likely will disappear one day.

lunarspeak
12-24-2012, 06:20
im going to really freak you out on this one and i bet you wont believe the things im going to say but its more likely true..


a coyote and prob several of his friends have ventured out of that field and into your yard and several hundred yards into the neighborhood...with a cat going in and out of your house id also bet that he has been on your porch..

and it doesnt matter if you kill him and most of his friends because as long as there are cats around as a food source then they will not leave.

ive killed four in the last 2 years and my negihbor has trapped and shot over 20 and we still have them around..

i once saw one in the parking lot of northlake mall in charlotte eating thrash

Dennis in MA
12-24-2012, 08:16
Shucks. C'mon up north. Our coyotes came in from OVER the Great Lakes. (Coyotes are not indigenous to the Northeast.)

As they went, they bred with wolves. Hybrids. Size of a medium-to-large dog. Hunt WELL in packs and regularly take down deer in my area. Full-size northern deer, not them 85lb deer they get in places.

Would have saved you $850 if you lived up here. Kitty wouldn't have had a chance.

camelotkid
12-24-2012, 08:24
don't care what a city ordinance says, if I see a coyote in my yard and I have my gun with me it is getting shot. I don't care if its with my AR or with a damn snubby. I hate coyotes.

Jay S.
12-24-2012, 08:27
Shucks. C'mon up north. Our coyotes came in from OVER the Great Lakes. (Coyotes are not indigenous to the Northeast.)

As they went, they bred with wolves. Hybrids. Size of a medium-to-large dog. Hunt WELL in packs and regularly take down deer in my area. Full-size northern deer, not them 85lb deer they get in places.

Would have saved you $850 if you lived up here. Kitty wouldn't have had a chance.

This. Moved from Maine to MS a few years ago. Big difference in the size. On the other hand, I have seen more bobcats down here in the last two years than I have my entire life up north. They are everywhere down here.

Steel Head
12-24-2012, 08:30
I hope kitters gets better soon:wavey:
I shoot at or kill any coyote I see at there are various cats,small dogs and chickens where I live.

G30SF/F-250
12-24-2012, 08:43
I hope your kitty heals up well.:wavey:

ranger1968
12-24-2012, 08:53
I invested a couple of thousand into my formerly feral stray cat, when he got caught in a radiator fan, now he has his own room and hates going outside.

That's a really pretty cat; I'm glad she's going to be OK....

Indoor is the right thing to do; they live longer, and they tend to be healthier in most cases;

Our three cats won't even go outside; they know their food dish is in the house, and there's dirt out there.

ithaca_deerslayer
12-24-2012, 10:00
At least with Northeastern coyote, I'd think that anytime a coyote could get his jaws on a cat, it would be over. I don't see any house cat putting up enough of a fight to be able to get away.

But having said that, a coyote might be in chase and not get a firm grip on the cat, and the cat might slip mostly out of reach and get up a tree or through a fence or something and get away wounded.

One night a year or so ago, a coyote almost got my cat. She is a barn cat, transitioned to an indoor/outdoor cat over the years, but always wants to go out every day or night to hunt rodents. One night I wake to a cat fight screaching sound, and go out with my 26. Coyote prints around my car. And a piece of my cat's fur with bloody skin attached from the middle of the tail. And by a stock fence, a big area of loose hair from my cat. I looked around, and circled around my pasture to find tracks out, or drops of blood to trail, but couldn't find anything. Came back, figuring she was a goner.

Had been calling for her, nothing. Then looked in the barn carefully, and found her up on the hay bales, laying in shock and bleeding from her tail. Took her into the basement and placed her in a basket, and just let her rest. The bleeding seemed like it was gelling and slowing, even though a 2" section of her tail was exposed raw flesh. A couple days like that and she started to move around a bit more, and even to timidly go outside. A few days more, and acting more normal, and the tail was just like bare scab for a couple inches, kinda gross looking but not infected. Weeks back to complete normal behavior, and the hair starting grow. Months later, the fur grew back, and you can't tell it happened. She's just as much a hunter as she ever was, but hopefully a little more careful.

I figure my immediately going outside had scared the coyote off as it was trying to get to my cat under the car. Maybe she had got grabbed just as she had made it under the car while running for life. Prints looked like two coyotes were trying to get under, probably when I opened the door to come out.

I can't promise you that I was wearing any clothes when I had run outside :)

mikegun
12-24-2012, 10:08
How would a high speed pellet gun do against them with a nice head shot?
Some of those things have good fps.

That might be ok inside city limits. Check first though.

id use this method anyway, whos to know....btw, very sorryu to hear about your cat, hes lucky to have a devoted owner like you...

Cooper
12-24-2012, 10:19
Well, we got a call this morning from the vet. A new doctor is on the morning shift, and this doctor is convinced that the cat was hit by a car. I am not convinced, especially because last night's doc was showing us bite marks and saliva from an attack. But I am not a vet.

In any event, this furball is staying indoors from now on. Thanks for all the responses and well-wishes in this thread!

TheExplorer
12-24-2012, 10:24
Yeah, a snow tire with studs.:upeyes:

Best wishes for a speedy recovery. Great looking feline you got there.

BSA70
12-24-2012, 10:59
$850, my heart would be broke too....l.

She is very lucky. May not be coyote, I would feel she would not have gotten away.

My cat was mauled by a racoon. We have them here in the city. He bit a chunk of muscle out of here left rear quarter. About the size of a 50 cent piece. I figured it would heal and she would have no problems. She limps badly to this day:crying:

BSA70
12-24-2012, 11:01
Well, we got a call this morning from the vet. A new doctor is on the morning shift, and this doctor is convinced that the cat was hit by a car. I am not convinced, especially because last night's doc was showing us bite marks and saliva from an attack. But I am not a vet.

In any event, this furball is staying indoors from now on. Thanks for all the responses and well-wishes in this thread!

That's bogus! They do not know what they are talking about. Go elsewhere!

lunarspeak
12-24-2012, 11:06
it might have been a car..i knew a kid that came to school with what looked like knife wounds..straight line..18 inches down the forearm,what appeared to be stab wounds.....he had fallen off the back of a pick up.

cangler
12-24-2012, 11:07
She is lucky to be alive!

It's disturbing to see coyotes attach cats, they are ruthless!

Now go take care of those wild dogs... you know what to do.

AK_Stick
12-24-2012, 11:27
Could be a fox. They'll tear a cat up. Id expect a yote to just kill a cat.

I have a red fox living in my neighborhood that takes cats regularly.

Hummer
12-24-2012, 11:58
That is terrible, but terrible things happen to pets that are allowed to roam on their own, be it a coyote, getting hit by a car, or some other accident or predator. Keep your girl indoors, it is much better for her. I hope she heals up ok.

This.

Indoor cats live longer, with far fewer expensive visits to the vet.

All my cats have been indoor only cats, and they have lived from 15 to 18 years. I provide a perch where they can look out the window, and they like going out on my 3 season (fully enclosed, with storm windows) porch.

I'm sorry about your cat, but keeping her indoors from now on is really the only way to keep her safe. At least one coyote knows where she lives, now.

Well, we got a call this morning from the vet. A new doctor is on the morning shift, and this doctor is convinced that the cat was hit by a car. I am not convinced, especially because last night's doc was showing us bite marks and saliva from an attack. But I am not a vet.

In any event, this furball is staying indoors from now on. Thanks for all the responses and well-wishes in this thread!


Sorry about your cat, and sorry you had to learn the hard lesson. It happened to me once, and I've never let it happen again.

I think a person who truly cares about their pet cat would not allow it to roam freely because of the risk from predators, accidents, and disease. Most keen observers of wildlife have seen plenty evidence of how coyotes, foxes, bobcats, hawks and owls take feral/free roaming domestic cats. They are doing just what comes naturally.

What isn't natural in North America is 200 million domestic cats that originated from Asia. Feral and free roaming cats take a terrible toll on native American wildlife. Many songbird populations are in dramatic decline, and some extirpated due largely to feral/free roaming cats. Estimates range from 12-20 million songbirds killed every day in the lower 48 due to the free roaming domestic cat.

Responsible cat owners keep their cats safe indoors at all times. JMO

Kingarthurhk
12-24-2012, 12:08
Let the cat out. An hour later she's back with half her lower jaw peeled off, bite marks around her ribcage and one paw de-gloved. $850 later the vet is supposedly patching her up. Breaks my heart to see her torn up like that.

I'm in a suburban neighborhood with no dogs. The vet said whatever got her was big enough to get its mouth around her whole body. We've been seeing coyotes in the field across the way, but they would have had to have ventured a couple hundred yards among the tight-knit houses to get up here. The cat doesn't stray very far.

Is that usual coyote behavior? What can be done. We're inside the city limits, so I can't shoot em.

With those type of injuries wouldn't euthenasia be more humane?

fusegsp
12-24-2012, 12:56
She is lucky to be alive!

It's disturbing to see coyotes attach cats, they are ruthless!

Now go take care of those wild dogs... you know what to do.From what I've seen, any carnivore is ruthless. Kill or be killed and all that.

Kevin108
12-24-2012, 13:04
Look for powderless .22 lr. I've only shot it in a Cricket but it was practically silent even with such a short rifle.

jtull7
12-24-2012, 18:20
I read somewhere that I believe to be authoritative that there are now coyotes in every county in the contiguous US. WOW!

The real enemies of cats and small dogs around here are the owls. If an indoor cat gets out by mistake, it won't last an hour.

BTW, in the last couple of weeks, we have had continuous snow on the ground, which is unusual. We have seen on at least four occasions coyotes hunting in packs of up to eight hunters. They have come within ten feet of our house. All early morning. We don't kill coyotes around here because they kill the rodents that carry the plague.

My wife is a little nervous walking the dog, but I make her carry bear spray with her. So far, so good.

FLIPPER 348
12-24-2012, 18:45
The coyotes will come to the door to snatch a cat if its hungry. She must have got in a good hit in to get away.

The only good thing about coyotes here, no friggin stray cats!



.......and they nab a few of the filthy pet-cats also

Pawcatch@aol.co
12-24-2012, 19:18
Buy some books and dvds and learn how to trap them.
www.wildlifecontrolsupplies.com is a great place to start.

The collarum trap is a great coyote control device if it is legal in your area.It is perfectly safe to use around cats.

LL6
12-24-2012, 20:04
The only good thing about coyotes here, no friggin stray cats!



.......and they nab a few of the filthy pet-cats also
Lighten up scrooge.

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_UuVwwaMKmZs/TQEAywRAS0I/AAAAAAAACSE/4X_0XGy77Rw/s1600/Mistletoe.JPG

DaneA
12-24-2012, 20:12
A high power pellet gun or 22 shorts. You will see that shot placement is king. Also if you just injure them the rest of the pack will take care of them for you.

NEOH212
12-24-2012, 20:24
I sure hope your kitty is doing well. That would tear my heart out to see any cat hurt like yours was!

I'm glad to hear she didn't get hurt any worse!

:wavey:

19crew
12-24-2012, 20:36
I'd suspect a raccoon, most of the ones in urban areas are huge. I doubt it would have got away from a coyote, coyotes will kill a dog their size without issue.

G29Reload
12-24-2012, 21:41
Let the cat out. An hour later she's back with half her lower jaw peeled off, bite marks around her ribcage and one paw de-gloved. $850 later the vet is supposedly patching her up. Breaks my heart to see her torn up like that.

I'm in a suburban neighborhood with no dogs. The vet said whatever got her was big enough to get its mouth around her whole body. We've been seeing coyotes in the field across the way, but they would have had to have ventured a couple hundred yards among the tight-knit houses to get up here. The cat doesn't stray very far.

Is that usual coyote behavior? What can be done. We're inside the city limits, so I can't shoot em.

Easy meet for wile e c.
1, keep kitty indoors, pet often, bring mouse toys and cat treats. Keep up with vets orders.
2. Go to gun store. Obtain .22 cb longs.

3. Cb longs very quiet, if neighbors see you it sounds like a pellet gun. Screw city ordinances. Kitty must be avenged.

4. Dust coyotes on sight.

bmoore
12-24-2012, 21:43
Coyotes are very good at luring. Most people don't realize but yotes have something like 1700 different vocalizations. They will get a dog lured out by sounding like a female in distress or other means. Then 3-5 more will sneak in and all ambush the dog. No dog that I know of could fend off that many hungry coyotes without an intervention.
Cats are naturally curious and I'm sure the coyotes can make sounds that most cats would want to check out.
Good luck on getting her healed up.

That's where I come in. I can lure coyotes, and my 22-250 talks them into sticking around.

Kevin108
12-24-2012, 22:07
Easy meet for wile e c.
1, keep kitty indoors, pet often, bring mouse toys and cat treats. Keep up with vets orders.
2. Go to gun store. Obtain .22 cb longs.

3. Cb longs very quiet, if neighbors see you it sounds like a pellet gun. Screw city ordinances. Kitty must be avenged.

4. Dust coyotes on sight.

.22 LR vs. .22 CB Long - YouTube

I'm sold!

Dalton Wayne
12-24-2012, 22:41
Sorry to hear about this, letting a cat out to roam is cruel and you are to blame. People please don't let your beloved pets out to roam.

When I moved into my house in town I was over run by stray cats I made quick work of them with my 22 and cb caps. the damage stray cats do is unbelievable I now have baby birds in my trees that I never had, and no longer the smell of cat spray.

I would never let a pet roam the neighborhood. My dog's are family members they have a fenced in yard they go out three times a day other then that they are kept in the house.

Armchair Commando
12-24-2012, 22:50
Easy meet for wile e c.
1, keep kitty indoors, pet often, bring mouse toys and cat treats. Keep up with vets orders.
2. Go to gun store. Obtain .22 cb longs.

3. Cb longs very quiet, if neighbors see you it sounds like a pellet gun. Screw city ordinances. Kitty must be avenged.

4. Dust coyotes on sight.

Yeah but if something does happen he'll be arrested for discharging a firearm in city limits, A Air Force Rifle will smoke a coyote very easily and he cannot be charged with discharging a firearm!

ilgunguygt
12-24-2012, 23:28
The only good thing about coyotes here, no friggin stray cats!



.......and they nab a few of the filthy pet-cats also
Too bad they dont nab filthy gun owners who vote for socialist presidents while bragging about it insisting they would NEVER touch gun rights.:whistling:

RPVG
12-24-2012, 23:34
When I lived in the Mojave Desert, I never could keep cats. Lord, I tried! Their smell keeps sidewinders away. But the damned coyotes killed 'em faster than I could replace 'em. There was no place for them to climb.

All my cats have been "working cats". I always fed 'em about half of what they needed and they "worked" for the rest.

sdsnet
12-24-2012, 23:44
My experience with my own cats showed the outdoor cats that survive attacks by other animals, being hit by cars and the like live longer (health wise) than my indoor only cats. Statistically though indoor cats live longer from what I have read. One of my indoor/outdoor cats cost us $1200 for hernia caused by bite and another 900 for two separate infections after fights. Expensive cat finally settled down.

Indoor cats are cheaper? I have 4 cats, 3 go outside. The indoor cat has had all but 3 of his teeth extracted due to gum disease and last year had a urinary tract blockage and spent 4 days in the emergency vet. Spent about $5500 on him over the 5 years we've had him.

Don't even take the other cats to the vet except for rabies shots every 3 years.

posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire (http://www.outdoorhub.com/mobile/)

BEER
12-25-2012, 00:04
1) if you let your dog/cat/other pet outside unattended you allow them to enter the food chain. domesticated animals don't usually fare well in the food chain. besides that, most neighbors don't appreciate other people's animals roaming around their property. i've got a mess of barn cats that come and go, but they're barn cats not pets. they serve a purpose and they tend to themselves. my 2 pet cats are indoor cats and have only experienced the great outdoors during 2 moves.

2) if you're the truly vengeful type and you want to avenge your cat do not kill the coyote, just wound it and the rest of the pack will do the rest for you. domesticated animals don't fare well in the food chain but wounded animals fare even worse.

jthrelf
12-25-2012, 00:08
crossbow?

happy seal
12-25-2012, 00:10
good luck with the cat. I got a female that is a mouser outdoors. Last summer the coyotes chased her up the tree that is right next to the house. We had to shoo them away. They are denned up in the back woods. I also saw a Fisher two weeks ago cross the road in front of the house. They will tear up a cat in two seconds. I took pictures but they didn't come out good (no zoom). Five years ago we had baby bobcats living under the front stoop. Wer came home from vacation to find them burrowed under the concrete. They took off after they realized people live in the house. This was before the cat and we were only gone for a week. :dunno:

i wouldn't want to be a cat in the clutches of death like that, horrifying to say the least.

goldenlight
12-25-2012, 03:34
Indoor cats are cheaper? I have 4 cats, 3 go outside. The indoor cat has had all but 3 of his teeth extracted due to gum disease and last year had a urinary tract blockage and spent 4 days in the emergency vet. Spent about $5500 on him over the 5 years we've had him.

Don't even take the other cats to the vet except for rabies shots every 3 years.

posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire (http://www.outdoorhub.com/mobile/)

That's just bad luck/bad genes.

I'm talking statistics.

Indoor cats don't get mauled by coyotes/dogs/foxes/rabid raccoons, shot by the arsehole neighbors, or hit by cars. They don't get FIP, FeLeuk, or FIV, either.

Indoor cats live longer, healthier lives. It's a fact.

Wayward Bound
12-25-2012, 04:09
That is terrible, but terrible things happen to pets that are allowed to roam on their own, be it a coyote, getting hit by a car, or some other accident or predator. Keep your girl indoors, it is much better for her. I hope she heals up ok. this.

I am glad you are keeping kitty inside, she will protest and beg to be let out, but after a while she will realize that she is a house cat. House cats live longer and are MUCH healthier than outdoor cats. Shoe her away from the door each time you enter or exit, make her realize that being near the door is OFF LIMITS.

Wayward Bound
12-25-2012, 04:09
She's tough! She's actually a neighborhood cat (well, she WAS . . . after $850 she's ours now) that was here when we moved in, and she spends her days mooching off everybody and her nights mooching off us specifically. She has survived several incidents like this one (though none nearly as severe) as well as being hit by a car before we knew her.

She will be an indoor cat from now on. We have to protect our investment.

http://www.darktopography.com/images/blog2010/rosiefocus1.jpg just beautiful!!!

LL6
12-25-2012, 08:16
Too bad they dont nab filthy gun owners who vote for socialist presidents while bragging about it insisting they would NEVER touch gun rights.:whistling:
+1 :rofl:

happyguy
12-25-2012, 08:27
I love listening to coyotes at night, but I love my cats more.

Best wishes for a speedy recovery for kitters.

Regards,
Comrade Happyguy :)