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audiomechanic
12-31-2012, 17:59
So I'm posting this for my wife using my account.

Back-story (shortened): my wife grew up in a very oppressive household that put fear of guns above that of death and taxes. Her mom was controlling and had mental problems herself. Then she met me. I had a few guns when we dated and got married, but I'm not a 'gun nut' (not that there's anything wrong with gun nuts :tongueout: ). She did not even want to be in the same room with a gun. I never pressured her to shoot, handle, or otherwise like my guns or any guns.

After 4 years of marriage and me not pressuring, her attitude and outlook on guns has radically changed. She shot my old .22 Luger pistol and then shot my .380 Sig P230 a few times. Then this year for Christmas I got her a G19 (which she picked out and tried out by renting at the range first) and she really loves it. However, she's having a bit of trouble at the range and she's becoming discouraged and down on herself.

The main problem is she's anticipating the trigger. She flinches just before firing which causes the barrel to drop and her to shoot low. She's on center for the most part, just low. The range guides have given her tips and tricks and whatnot to help her, but it hasn't really. She's been working on taking her time to shoot and notice what she's doing incorrectly.

She went to the range by herself today and was told that she needs to stop shooting the Glock and solely shoot the .22.

My thought is this shooting thing is all still so new that she's still having a bit of sensory overload (her words) and she's just not used to it yet. I told her she just needs time and practice. More time behind her Glock and many more rounds to get her used to not only the gun, but the recoil, the noise, and being in a loud environment with other guns. She does better after she's been shooting for 30 minutes or so. She does worst when she first arrives. She's only shot at 7 yards and is concerned about being ready for her CHL class (womens only at the end of Feb).

Any other ladies out there can offer advice? Am I off base with my thoughts? I've got firearms experience, but I'm no expert.

My wife thanks y'all in advance. :)

4Rules
12-31-2012, 18:36
Both recoil and noise can detract from the shooting experience - in a negative way - so that advice to stick with .22LR until able to shoot good groups with it is solid advice. Double-plug to mitigate noise - with quality maximum-attentation ear plugs combined with quality maximum-attentation ear muffs - and shooting outdoors on quieter ranges. For best results, in addition to the preceeding, also find a qualified trainer - pistol instructor or pistol coach - for some formalized one-on-one shooting instruction.

colin1230
12-31-2012, 20:19
Advice doesn't get better than 4Rules!! Have fun with your wife and a .22, and I mean a lot of fun. Her shooting and confidence will only get better, yours too.

GT4494
12-31-2012, 21:22
Best training aide I have found is a laser. You can put it on the g19 and she can do dry fire practicing anytime and anywhere. Teaches great trigger control.

MAC702
12-31-2012, 21:32
... dry fire practicing...

This.

She should do hours of dry fire practice every month. On the order of several times more trigger presses than actual rounds fired at the range.

Then, when she gets to the range, trigger control is much easier, because it is a mental discipline and the dry-fire practice gives you an easier ability to shoot the same way you dry-fire without moving the gun.

And yes, a good instructor is worth his pay for an hour of live-fire training.

TH3180
12-31-2012, 22:35
I agree 100% with what 4Rules posted. Here are a few things that really help(ed) me.
#1 Dry fire with an empty case on top of the slide. Start with a 45 case and when she can consistently dry fire without the case falling off. Move down in case diameter. I still do this with an empty .22LR standing upright. It is harder then you would think.
#2 Chase a hole. Put a blank piece of paper up as her target. Have her shoot towards the middle of the paper for the 1st shot. Remaining shots out of the mag using the 1st shot has your aiming point.
#3 The pencil trick. While dry firing. Put a sharp pencil down the barrel eraser end 1st. Start at about 4" away from a blank piece of paper at eye level. Pull the trigger. the 1st mark is your aiming point. As the group tightens up, move back. This works better with non-striker pistols, but it still works ok with GLOCKs.
#4 Chapstick. Take a tube of Chapstick, put one end on the pad of the the trigger finger and the other end at the webbing between the thumb and trigger finger. Simulate pulling the trigger. If the tube is going at an angle either way when pulling the trigger. The trigger pull is wrong. Hell it's the only reason I carry chapstick in my pocket. You can practice trigger pull anytime anywhere, without having a gun in your hand. It keeps me sane in rush-hour traffic 5 days a week.
I dry fire way more then I live fire. It's all about a good sight picture and feeling the break of the trigger.

vettely
12-31-2012, 22:40
I agree 100% with what 4Rules posted. Here are a few things that really help(ed) me.
#1 Dry fire with an empty case on top of the slide. Start with a 45 case and when she can consistently dry fire without the case falling off. Move down in case diameter. I still do this with an empty .22LR standing upright. It is harder then you would think.
#2 Chase a hole. Put a blank piece of paper up as her target. Have her shoot towards the middle of the paper for the 1st shot. Remaining shots out of the mag using the 1st shot has your aiming point.
#3 The pencil trick. While dry firing. Put a sharp pencil down the barrel eraser end 1st. Start at about 4" away from a blank piece of paper at eye level. Pull the trigger. the 1st mark is your aiming point. As the group tightens up, move back. This works better with non-striker pistols, but it still works ok with GLOCKs.
#4 Chapstick. Take a tube of Chapstick, put one end on the pad of the the trigger finger and the other end at the webbing between the thumb and trigger finger. Simulate pulling the trigger. If the tube is going at an angle either way when pulling the trigger. The trigger pull is wrong. Hell it's the only reason I carry chapstick in my pocket. You can practice trigger pull anytime anywhere, without having a gun in your hand. It keeps me sane in rush-hour traffic 5 days a week.
I dry fire way more then I live fire. It's all about a good sight picture and feeling the break of the trigger.
#1. Try balancing a penny on the front site while dry firing.

audiomechanic
01-01-2013, 09:45
Thanks all for the advice!!! I will run this past her. She's really discouraged right now and I'm trying to encourage her and just reaffirm that this takes practice. Her CHL class is Feb 24th and she's very concerned she won't be ready in time and won't pass the shooting proficiency part of the class. I think she'll do fine, personally, but she does need practice.

There's not really a good outdoor range around (there is one but it sucks and is stupid expensive) but she will try doubling up on hearing protection and shooting the .22. We'll check and see how much an hour of firearm training will be at the range we frequent. Otherwise, when she signed up for her CHL, she also signed up for a 2 hour basic handgun training course and will be taking that prior to the class as well.

She's being really hard on herself (a side effect of growing up with and learning from insane mentally ill parents) and it sucks watching that.

Thanks again everyone!!!

SARDG
01-03-2013, 09:13
Solid stuff from 4Rules.

Is your wife's upcoming course an NRA First Steps Pistol course, by chance? That is the NRA's most basic class and recognized in many states for CCW carry permits and the target distance is 5 yds. The student must get 15 rounds on a paper plate-sized target and .22s are generally used.

Where are you located? (I wish everyone on GT would list their location - it's really helpful in responding.) I'm an NRA instructor and lead the womens programs at my Florida (outdoor) club and am happy to offer extra (free) help to women when needed.

audiomechanic
01-03-2013, 10:15
Solid stuff from 4Rules.

Is your wife's upcoming course an NRA First Steps Pistol course, by chance? That is the NRA's most basic class and recognized in many states for CCW carry permits and the target distance is 5 yds. The student must get 15 rounds on a paper plate-sized target and .22s are generally used.

Where are you located? (I wish everyone on GT would list their location - it's really helpful in responding.) I'm an NRA instructor and lead the womens programs at my Florida (outdoor) club and am happy to offer extra (free) help to women when needed.

Hey there. We're in Texas (Katy specifically). Sorry about the location, will update that ASAP.

The class is not an NRA class, but is a Texas approved CHL course. Most of what the class teaches is about Texas law, but some sceneros and handgun handle is discussed as well. The firing test IIRC is 50 rounds from at least a .32 cal at 7, 10, and 15 yards. Not that hard, but the wife is stressing about it.

Thanks for the reply!

Sent from my orifice.

xidica
01-03-2013, 10:29
How is her grip and stance? I would recommend she read this if she hasn't :

http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/ayoob85.html

I can also virtually guarantee she will pass the shooting portion of the Texas CHL class if she can operate the weapon safely and hit paper at 7 yards.

Also, for a good outdoor range check out Hot Wells in Cypress. Its my regular spot to practice. Worth the drive. No rapid fire, but great covered, segregated, and large outdoor pistol range with nice people working there to boot.

janice6
01-03-2013, 10:33
I'm, sure she is learning just fine. Just impatient with her progress.

The advice posted here will help her considerably, don't give up. Sometimes it just takes a little longer to get the hang of it.

audiomechanic
01-03-2013, 10:49
How is her grip and stance? I would recommend she read this if she hasn't :

http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/ayoob85.html

I can also virtually guarantee she will pass the shooting portion of the Texas CHL class if she can operate the weapon safely and hit paper at 7 yards.

Also, for a good outdoor range check out Hot Wells in Cypress. Its my regular spot to practice. Worth the drive. No rapid fire, but great covered, segregated, and large outdoor pistol range with nice people working there to boot.

Yep, sent her that article about 2 weeks ago. She read it. :)

Her stance is good. Not as dramatic as in the article, but sturdy with a forward lean. The gun is definitely not pushing her backwards. Her grip leaves a little to be desired, especially in the grip strength category, but she's not limp wristing. She'll get a stronger grip as her forearm muscles increase in strength.

What she's doing the most is flinching before the trigger (anticipation). This, of course, is causing the muzzle of the gun to drop just before fire and she's hitting the paper low. Her grouping is actually not that bad, especially horizontally, she's just low. When she doesn't anticipate, she's pretty close to the bull.

I've been meaning to check out Hot Wells. A coworker of mine shoots there and likes it. Thanks. :)

Sent from my orifice.

audiomechanic
01-03-2013, 10:58
I'm, sure she is learning just fine. Just impatient with her progress.

The advice posted here will help her considerably, don't give up. Sometimes it just takes a little longer to get the hang of it.

This is what I'm thinking too. She's doing something that was strictly forbidden (and beat into her) growing up so she's having to battle herself just to do it, let alone improve. She just needs practice and time and to do the things mentioned here.

I'll keep y'all posted on her progress. :)

Sent from my orifice.

xidica
01-03-2013, 11:02
Yep, sent her that article about 2 weeks ago. She read it. :)

Her stance is good. Not as dramatic as in the article, but sturdy with a forward lean. The gun is definitely not pushing her backwards. Her grip leaves a little to be desired, especially in the grip strength category, but she's not limp wristing. She'll get a stronger grip as her forearm muscles increase in strength.

What she's doing the most is flinching before the trigger (anticipation). This, of course, is causing the muzzle of the gun to drop just before fire and she's hitting the paper low. Her grouping is actually not that bad, especially horizontally, she's just low. When she doesn't anticipate, she's pretty close to the bull.

I've been meaning to check out Hot Wells. A coworker of mine shoots there and likes it. Thanks. :)

Sent from my orifice.

Hmm. Try buying some snap caps/dummy rounds and load the mags for her. When she gets to one it will be very clear what is happening and it will almost be embarrassing, but in a good way ("did all those people just see me flinch real bad? I don't want to do that again"). She will then be focused on making sure she doesn't flinch. With an explosion covering up a flinch its hard for anyone to really accept that they're flinching, but its just part of shooting and we all have to deal with it. The snap cap drills are one of the best and cheapest ways to correct the problem.

I'm really glad that she is a convert. Gives me hope that mine might eventually see the light!

audiomechanic
01-03-2013, 12:37
Hmm. Try buying some snap caps/dummy rounds and load the mags for her. When she gets to one it will be very clear what is happening and it will almost be embarrassing, but in a good way ("did all those people just see me flinch real bad? I don't want to do that again"). She will then be focused on making sure she doesn't flinch. With an explosion covering up a flinch its hard for anyone to really accept that they're flinching, but its just part of shooting and we all have to deal with it. The snap cap drills are one of the best and cheapest ways to correct the problem.

I'm really glad that she is a convert. Gives me hope that mine might eventually see the light!

Funny you mentioned that, she sent me an email about an hour ago with a link to thewellarmedwoman.com website with those for sale. I'm sure they can be found locally too.

I hope your wife converts over too. Mine sees what's happening to this country and wants to be armed. She no longer feels safe, even in Texas. :( She's worried (as many of us are) about what's coming politically.

xidica
01-03-2013, 12:42
Funny you mentioned that, she sent me an email about an hour ago with a link to thewellarmedwoman.com website with those for sale. I'm sure they can be found locally too.

I hope your wife converts over too. Mine sees what's happening to this country and wants to be armed. She no longer feels safe, even in Texas. :( She's worried (as many of us are) about what's coming politically.


AMSS gun shop off Jones and 1960 definitely has snap caps. I think Gander Mountain does as well but I refuse to pay the high prices there.

audiomechanic
01-03-2013, 12:43
Thanks! Will check 'em out!

Bren
01-03-2013, 13:09
After 4 years of marriage and me not pressuring, her attitude and outlook on guns has radically changed. She shot my old .22 Luger pistol and then shot my .380 Sig P230 a few times. Then this year for Christmas I got her a G19 (which she picked out and tried out by renting at the range first) and she really loves it. However, she's having a bit of trouble at the range and she's becoming discouraged and down on herself.

The main problem is she's anticipating the trigger. She flinches just before firing which causes the barrel to drop and her to shoot low. She's on center for the most part, just low. The range guides have given her tips and tricks and whatnot to help her, but it hasn't really. She's been working on taking her time to shoot and notice what she's doing incorrectly.


Get her some training.

I said "get" not "give" - you should not even be at the range when she gets training.

Aside from you, in particular, not having much training or experience, a husband or relative is one of the worst things that can happen to a new shooter (especially a female new shooter). Find her a class with a good instructor (not a class that is being run just for people who need to put in X hours to get a certification of some kind). A "women only" class would be best, if it's available.

I told her she just needs time and practice.

No, first she needs competent training. THEN time and practice might help. Practice does not make perfect, only perfect practice makes perfect. Many shooters start with poor training and learn bad techniques that actually make it much, much more difficult for them to learn to shoot.

audiomechanic
01-03-2013, 13:12
Get her some training.

I said "get" not "give" - you should not even be at the range when she gets training.

Aside from you, in particular, not having much training or experience, a husband or relative is one of the worst things that can happen to a new shooter, esepcially a female new shooter. Find her a class with a good instructor (not a class that is being run just for people who need to put in X hours to get a certification of some kind). A "women only" class would be best, if it's available.

The first I've heard of it being a bad idea for a spouse to teach the other spouse to shoot was very recently. I have to ask why? Not that I'm trying to be Mr. Knowitall teacher because I'm not, I'm curious as to why it's such a blanketed bad idea is all.

xidica
01-03-2013, 14:02
The first I've heard of it being a bad idea for a spouse to teach the other spouse to shoot was very recently. I have to ask why? Not that I'm trying to be Mr. Knowitall teacher because I'm not, I'm curious as to why it's such a blanketed bad idea is all.

I don't know all the reasons, but here are a few :

1. Wives don't fully listen to husbands. Some do, but in the "yes, dear" sense.
2. Some guys are know it alls.
3. Most of us aren't qualified firearms instructors trained to see and correct problems.
4. Wife will take a training class more seriously since it costs money and she will want to follow the instructor more closely because, after all its what he does for a living.
5. Wife may not want to let you down or feels pressured to do well to impress you. Might not ask questions to risk embarrassment.
6. You'll be too nice with commentary or won't point out what's wrong for fear of hurting her feelings.

Just some thoughts. FWIW the Hot Wells trainer does pistol and self defense classes, forgot his name but its the same guy that did my CHL class. I can't speak for his defensive pistol course, but his CHL class was well run.

The stuff I offered was more for DIY and self correcting, since she sounds interested and like a go-getter. I'm in agreement that formal training is best ultimately.

Bren
01-03-2013, 14:45
The first I've heard of it being a bad idea for a spouse to teach the other spouse to shoot was very recently. I have to ask why? Not that I'm trying to be Mr. Knowitall teacher because I'm not, I'm curious as to why it's such a blanketed bad idea is all.

The first you've heard? It is very well-known among firearms instructors who teach civilians.

The "why" is because a husband/wife relationship makes it much harder for the student to take advice and correction and much more likely the 2 will get mad at each other and want to quit - beyond that, most husbands think they know how to shoot and most don't know crap. Not being actual instructors, they don't know how to shoot or how to teach, so they screw up their student.\

Basically, what xidica said, above.

SARDG
01-03-2013, 14:50
I failed to point out in my post #9 that I am a female NRA Instructor/RSO. Our club's Instructors are all volunteers and instruct for the altruistic reasons many instructors may have long-since forgotten.

Our women's programs are run by female instructors with additional assistance from the male instructors when necessary. Our monthly Women's Shooting Group is taught and supervised by female instructors/ROs only and our quarterly ladies-only class and annual ladies' day is organized and introduced by our female instructors with much appreciated help from the male instructors. In each of these events – monthly, quarterly, and annually - gentlemen friends of the ladies are uninvited. If they would like to come to the range, they are required to be way back off the line or invited to go to our open (public) range. Male spouses/BFs/SOs can get abusive and loud. I RO our various competitive matches and have told more than one gentleman to get away and go sit down when they were badgering their SO at the line.

Not only that... it is absolutely true that many men do not know proper fundamentals themselves and get the ladies headed down the wrong track. We teach the NRA book.

Okay, many SOs are not like that...but too many are so we leave the ladies' events and classes to the ladies to enjoy, and with female instructors if at all possible.

audiomechanic
01-03-2013, 14:51
I don't know all the reasons, but here are a few :

1. Wives don't fully listen to husbands. Some do, but in the "yes, dear" sense.
2. Some guys are know it alls.
3. Most of us aren't qualified firearms instructors trained to see and correct problems.
4. Wife will take a training class more seriously since it costs money and she will want to follow the instructor more closely because, after all its what he does for a living.
5. Wife may not want to let you down or feels pressured to do well to impress you. Might not ask questions to risk embarrassment.
6. You'll be too nice with commentary or won't point out what's wrong for fear of hurting her feelings.

Just some thoughts. FWIW the Hot Wells trainer does pistol and self defense classes, forgot his name but its the same guy that did my CHL class. I can't speak for his defensive pistol course, but his CHL class was well run.

The stuff I offered was more for DIY and self correcting, since she sounds interested and like a go-getter. I'm in agreement that formal training is best ultimately.

I can respect those reasons. We had planned for my wife to go through instructor training soon and may do it through Hot Wells.

My wife says she doesn't feel presured by me and feels that she can ask me questions, and has, many questions. I'm no expert shooter, nor am I an instructor but I try to help the best I can. And what I don't know, I default to guiding her to ask those who are professionals and know much more than I. A training course for her always sounded like a good idea in my mind and hers.

Sent from my orifice.

audiomechanic
01-03-2013, 14:54
I failed to point out in my post #9 that I am a female NRA Instructor/RSO. Our club's Instructors are all volunteers and instruct for the altruistic reasons many instructors may have long-since forgotten.

Our women's programs are run by female instructors with additional assistance from the male instructors when necessary. Our monthly Women's Shooting Group is taught and supervised by female instructors/ROs only and our quarterly ladies-only class and annual ladies' day is organized and introduced by our female instructors with much appreciated help from the male instructors. In each of these events monthly, quarterly, and annually - gentlemen friends of the ladies are uninvited. If they would like to come to the range, they are required to be way back off the line or invited to go to our open (public) range. Male spouses/BFs/SOs can get abusive and loud. I RO our various competitive matches and have told more than one gentleman to get away and go sit down when they were badgering their SO at the line.

Not only that... it is absolutely true that many men do not know proper fundamentals themselves and get the ladies headed down the wrong track. We teach the NRA book.

Okay, many SOs are not like that...but too many are so we leave the ladies' events and classes to the ladies to enjoy, and with female instructors if at all possible.

That all makes perfect sense to me!

Sent from my orifice.

audiomechanic
01-03-2013, 14:56
The first you've heard? It is very well-known among firearms instructors who teach civilians.

The "why" is because a husband/wife relationship makes it much harder for the student to take advice and correction and much more likely the 2 will get mad at each other and want to quit - beyond that, most husbands think they know how to shoot and most don't know crap. Not being actual instructors, they don't know how to shoot or how to teach, so they screw up their student.\

Basically, what xidica said, above.

Yes, he first I've heard. Calm down, I'm not trying to form an argument FOR being my wife's primary teacher. I'm not against her getting training and she will from a qualified instructor.

Sent from my orifice.

SARDG
01-03-2013, 15:09
The first you've heard? It is very well-known among firearms instructors who teach civilians...
I remember a Ladies-Only match (not at our club) that I RO'd and also shot, attended largely by female LEOs. I've forgotten the exact event that triggered the instructor in me, but remember that one LEO was doing something rather bazaar at the line (grip, I think...) I asked her if she wanted some advice. She said okay, but in reality, blew me off as I wasn't her LE firearms instructor. 10 minutes later, she's at the line again with her (male) LEO Instructor and he starts railing on her mercilessly - and she takes it. I gave him a dirty look, but didn't completely stop him. Training, man-to-women, LEO style. :upeyes:

audiomechanic
01-12-2013, 17:57
To give an update: wife went to the range last weekend and today and I accompanied her (her request; she wanted me there). So far she's doing much better! Still anticipating the trigger a bit, but not nearly as bad. She's relaxing more at the range and is getting used to the environment. Last weekend and this weekend she did a lot of shooting with the .22 pistol. That has helped a lot. At 7yds, she can make about a 6" diameter group around the bull area. When she switches to the Glock, she repeats this, but after a couple of mags, she begins jumping the trigger again. Last weekend, I loaded the .22 for her, and a couple of times I faked her out and only loaded 1 or two rounds into the gun and told her it was fully loaded. This had the same effect as the fake bullets. She definitely felt herself flinching and tensing as she pulled the trigger with no round there to fire. This was a lesson for her and from that point on, she can now recognize herself when she's flinching.

This week was even more improved than last week. She shot the .22 about 60% of the time, only flinching once or twice and putting probably 100-120 rounds through it. When she switched over to the Glock, she flinched a little bit, but now, even when she flinches, the results on the paper are lot less dramatic! Before, when she would flinch, the holes would be about at the 7-o'clock position and the majority of her shots would be at least inside the 7-ring (or even lower than that). Today 80% or better of her shots at 7yds are within the 9-ring with only a few dropping into the 8 and very few in the 7-ring. I gave her lots of encouragement and praise which works well for her.

Towards the end of her time, we switched targets and she emptied 2 mags into the 10-ring of the target with her G19, completely decimating the bullseye of the paper. Then a kid in the booth next to us rented a Dessert Eagle .50 cal and started firing that monster. This freaked her out a little and she started flinching again, but still kept most of her shots within the 9-ring anyway. She's improving and feeling better about herself and her progress. :supergrin:

Thanks for the tips, everyone! They are paying off!

To answer the nay-sayers: yes, she will get training from an instructor. We have not had the money yet, but will soon. :upeyes:

xidica
01-12-2013, 18:50
Really glad to hear about the improvement and thanks for giving us an update! Did you try out Hot Wells? If so, how'd you like it?

audiomechanic
01-12-2013, 18:52
Hey thanks! She's feeling good about herself and her progress.

We haven't tried Hot Wells yet, but that is where we will get her a private training session. Right now we're shooting for the end of Jan for that.

janice6
01-12-2013, 18:59
Excellent news. congratulations to her. She will be an excellent shooter in no time. Anything worth doing, is worth doing to excess.....:wavey:

She is doing a very good thing by taking responsibility for her own safety in todays world.

My wife took a pistol course at the range and when she came back I asked her what she shot. She said: .22, 9mm, .38, .40, .357 and .45. I asked how she liked the .357 and she said "it wasn't bad but the .45 was easier shooting".

Many people are afraid of the calibers other people have told them the be afraid of. Women make very good shooters because they take instruction well.

audiomechanic
01-12-2013, 19:07
Thanks! She feels good about learning to shoot and beginning to carry.

One plus in the whole thing is she picked out the G19 she owns. I didn't buy her a gun and say, "here, shoot this." We rented several guns from the range and she settled on two she really liked. The Sig P229 and the G19. We didn't have the funds for the P229 and it was a bit large and heavy for CC so the G19 was it! She likes her G19 a lot and is really beginning to enjoy shooting it. The more she goes, the more relaxed she is and the better time she has.

You're definitely right about calibers. Although, I'm a bit afraid of the .50 cal that was being shot next to us today, simply because that massive gun was about hitting the kid shooting it in the face when it went off. No thanks. LOL

When my wife doesn't flinch, her grouping and aim is impressive by my standards, especially given her background and experience level. She's movin up quick!

We'll be back at the range next weekend for more practice! Past two trips to the range, I have not fired one round. It's all about her.

audiomechanic
02-01-2013, 07:08
Another update: She continues to improve. The past 2 trips to the range she has not flinched with the .22 at all. She starts with the .22, puts about 4-5 mags through that as a 'warm up' and then switches to the Glock. Her grouping with the .22 is about 4 inches at 7 yards which is pretty darn good IMO. Her grouping with the Glock is about 6-7 inches at 7 yards when she doesn't flinch. Each time she goes to the range, she flinches less and less with the Glock. She's still flinching about 1/4 to 1/3 of her shots as of this last trip, but it is decreasing with experience. She's also doubled her hearing protection which has helped as well. When she does flinch, it's not as dramatic as before. The shots are not as low on the paper as before. Before, she would flinch so bad her shots were down at the bottom edge of the paper, or even under it. Not, all of her shots are within the 7 ring, and when she doesn't flinch, she's within the 9 ring consistently.

This last trip to the range, she had to shoot my Glock 23 instead of her 19 because we ran out of 9mm ammo and can't find any! The .40 has a bit more punch than the 9mm, of course, but she did amazingly well with it! We even stepped her distance back to 10 yards and she says shooting at 10 yards is easier than 7! She'll be going again to the range tomorrow, but this time by herself. I think she'll do fine. Not the first time she's gone solo. Her CHL class is towards the end of Feb so she's got 3 more weekends to practice. I think she'll pass the shooting portion fine.

She still has one box of 9mm left, but she's saving that for the CHL class, unless of course we find some in stock before then. Heck, if she get's good at shooting the G23 before then, shooting the G19 for her test will be a piece of cake.

Shadowhawk176
02-06-2013, 08:46
Best thing to do for eliminating the "flinch factor" is dry firing. That will get her used to pulling the trigger and not flinching. Sure, it is different when a round is in the barrel, but if she could get used to the act of pulling the trigger without flinching, that will help. If she catches herself flinching while using live ammo, have her remove the ammo and dry fire again. If you're concerned about the notion of dry firing damaging the gun (which I have never observed in any of my guns) then pick up some 9mm snap caps, which will give the firing pin something to hit that is meant specifically for that purpose. Not to mention she can also do dry firing practically anywhere, naturally just as long as she's very careful to ensure the gun is empty. :winkie:

So I'm posting this for my wife using my account.

Back-story (shortened): my wife grew up in a very oppressive household that put fear of guns above that of death and taxes. Her mom was controlling and had mental problems herself. Then she met me. I had a few guns when we dated and got married, but I'm not a 'gun nut' (not that there's anything wrong with gun nuts :tongueout: ). She did not even want to be in the same room with a gun. I never pressured her to shoot, handle, or otherwise like my guns or any guns.

After 4 years of marriage and me not pressuring, her attitude and outlook on guns has radically changed. She shot my old .22 Luger pistol and then shot my .380 Sig P230 a few times. Then this year for Christmas I got her a G19 (which she picked out and tried out by renting at the range first) and she really loves it. However, she's having a bit of trouble at the range and she's becoming discouraged and down on herself.

The main problem is she's anticipating the trigger. She flinches just before firing which causes the barrel to drop and her to shoot low. She's on center for the most part, just low. The range guides have given her tips and tricks and whatnot to help her, but it hasn't really. She's been working on taking her time to shoot and notice what she's doing incorrectly.

She went to the range by herself today and was told that she needs to stop shooting the Glock and solely shoot the .22.

My thought is this shooting thing is all still so new that she's still having a bit of sensory overload (her words) and she's just not used to it yet. I told her she just needs time and practice. More time behind her Glock and many more rounds to get her used to not only the gun, but the recoil, the noise, and being in a loud environment with other guns. She does better after she's been shooting for 30 minutes or so. She does worst when she first arrives. She's only shot at 7 yards and is concerned about being ready for her CHL class (womens only at the end of Feb).

Any other ladies out there can offer advice? Am I off base with my thoughts? I've got firearms experience, but I'm no expert.

My wife thanks y'all in advance. :)

Trader
02-06-2013, 17:35
I would advise that she use industrial foam ear plugs AND a good set of ear muffs. I like the electronic muffs as I can still
hear range commands. This combo will greatly cut down on noise and blast and help her with trigger follow through. Another would be to change the GL19 serrated trigger out for a smooth trigger (GLSP00357) Some of the serrations are sharp on some triggers and tough on trigger finger.

ArmyDoc
02-07-2013, 06:11
One thing I find beneficial when dealing with flinch is to train on a revolver loaded with a mix of blank (already fired) rounds and live rounds. Spin the cylendar before firing do they don't know what they will be shooting on the first shot. When they land on a blank, they see their own flinch, and it becomes clear to them what they are doing, in a way that is much more understandible than words. As they focus on not flinching, never knowing if it will be an empty or a live round, they make very rapid improvements.

fnfalman
02-07-2013, 15:17
The first I've heard of it being a bad idea for a spouse to teach the other spouse to shoot was very recently. I have to ask why? Not that I'm trying to be Mr. Knowitall teacher because I'm not, I'm curious as to why it's such a blanketed bad idea is all.

First of all the teaching spouse may not be knowledgeable enough.

Secondly even if the spouse is knowledgeable it doesn't mean that the person can teach.

Thirdly the two spouses are too emotionally vested to make objective calls.


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GeneralSnafu
02-07-2013, 17:45
Thanks all for the advice!!! I will run this past her. She's really discouraged right now and I'm trying to encourage her and just reaffirm that this takes practice. Her CHL class is Feb 24th and she's very concerned she won't be ready in time and won't pass the shooting proficiency part of the class. I think she'll do fine, personally, but she does need practice.

There's not really a good outdoor range around (there is one but it sucks and is stupid expensive) but she will try doubling up on hearing protection and shooting the .22. We'll check and see how much an hour of firearm training will be at the range we frequent. Otherwise, when she signed up for her CHL, she also signed up for a 2 hour basic handgun training course and will be taking that prior to the class as well.

She's being really hard on herself (a side effect of growing up with and learning from insane mentally ill parents) and it sucks watching that.

Thanks again everyone!!!

I don't know about Texas but in Florida, there is no shooting proficiency part of the test. Basically if you can fire off one round downrange, without dropping the gun or killing anyone, you're pretty much good to go. Yup, it's pretty ridiculous but, that's Floriduh for you.

audiomechanic
02-08-2013, 06:52
First of all the teaching spouse may not be knowledgeable enough.

Secondly even if the spouse is knowledgeable it doesn't mean that the person can teach.

Thirdly the two spouses are too emotionally vested to make objective calls.


Posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire (http://www.outdoorhub.com/mobile/)

Yeah, good points. So far, my wife is appreciative of my help and has asked me to accompany her to the range. She feels more comfortable with me than the overly-pushy range guides there. Last weekend, she went to the range solo and from here on out till her CHL test in 3 weeks she'll be going alone. That way I don't become a crutch for her. I'm not an expert or professional as I have noted, but I do at least know the basics which is all I was attempting to help her with. However, I never forced my help upon her. She requested it. I am all for her going to professionals for training and she actually has a class coming up in a couple weeks with a professional. Once she gets her CHL, we plan to do further training in handgun handling, proficiency and some tactical stuff. Both of us.

Yeah, I know that me teaching her is unorthodox, but we're an unorthodox couple and don't fit into most typical social norms.

I don't know about Texas but in Florida, there is no shooting proficiency part of the test. Basically if you can fire off one round downrange, without dropping the gun or killing anyone, you're pretty much good to go. Yup, it's pretty ridiculous but, that's Floriduh for you.

There is a shooting proficiency test in Texas. 50 rounds in 5 round sets. 5, 10, and 15 yards. Although it's not a marksmanship test so, from what I remember from my test, as long as someone hits the paper the majority of the time, they pass. Inside the 7 ring gets them a fair score too.

68Electra
02-13-2013, 07:26
You might consider an Advantage Arms .22LR conversion kit for the glock, it will keep the same trigger and grip shape, weight etc. Switching to a target .22 with different sights and trigger and grip angle will of course reduce recoil, but the gun feels so different one might still anticipate recoil with the totally different feeling glock in hand.

Tom D
02-21-2013, 17:57
Get to know someone who reloads or take it up yourself and arrange for some low velocity rounds. The minimum recoil and noise will make shooting her favorite 19 something she'll be eager to do.

Ideally loads at the bottom of the velocity chart and get comfortable with those.

I suggest she disregard grouping to any degree. Stand off 5 yards with you loading her mags and let her have at it fire the gun with the goal to empty the mag and have another ready for her to load and take off again. It wont be long she wont pay a bit of attention to noise or recoil and her groups with naturally improve. Take 500 rounds to the range and shoot them all. (reloads with the near squib charges) By the time she finishes the 500 she'll want to shoot something with a little more bite to it.

My wife had the same frame of mind about guns and its how I helped her realize the boom don't bite and that recoil is insignificant.

I reload so it was easy to keep it affordable. We shoot in the back yard (we're very rural) I sat with a pail of rounds between my legs and load her mags and she would drop the mag for me and I'd had another on the bench for her to pick up and go at it. No waiting. Every couple hundred rounds she'd go pee and I 'd swab the barrel and she'd bring a fresh pitcher of sweet tea and we would begin another session, if she wanted, usually we'd go for 500 rds.

In 4 or so 1-2 hour sessions she was putting every round in 4". She goes out now and is shooting at 15-20 yds and has no trouble. She's shooting heavier loads now and has no issues with it at all.

Tell her to relax about the CC stuff take the class when she's pumped with confidence. She doesn't need to pack until then and the stress is bad for her shooting experience in every respect. (I know how that suggestion sounds, sorry)

If your in TX Id find a spot out in the national forest or desert somewhere and make it your private range away from everyone.

Do yourself a big favor learn how to roll your own. Its the next step to really taking control of the whole shooting thing. My wife shoots my 34 and I cast our bullets and use the KKM barrel for plinking lead. It became second nature for her in a matter of a few months.

She really likes shooting my Detective Special which is her carry gun I guess I should say her D.S . it was her choice for her class.

AND if I havent said enough she now reloads 9mm and .38 special and I LIKE THAT!

FLAHOTROD
02-21-2013, 19:14
Good advice, TomD.

furioso2112
02-21-2013, 19:53
Has she ever tried .45 or a heavier gun? Though I like both rounds, I find .45 more predictable and controllable.

Cheri81
02-24-2013, 12:57
I guess i am luckier than most my husband is a 14 year veteran, was a sniper, an armor, and was the firearms trainer for his unit in the Army. So i feel comfortable with him tweaking my performance and i am not a new shooter i was raised shooting from the time i was 5 with a BB gun then a 410 shot gun, a 22 rifle, and finally my first handgun when i was 13. I did stop shooting and handling guns for about 8 years before getting back into it so i do need reminders every now and then on stance and grip. I also appreciate the tips on trigger pull i find myself allowing the barrel to travel some on longer trigger pulls and it pulls my shots high. I use a laser sight and dry fire to try to see how bad i travel and try to correct it, the laser gives me an unmistakable visual that i can watch and adjust

Just thought i would share my own little trick in case it might help anyone else who might not "SEE" it otherwise (i tried to argue i wasn't moving that much)

Cheri81
02-24-2013, 13:02
I don't know about Texas but in Florida, there is no shooting proficiency part of the test. Basically if you can fire off one round downrange, without dropping the gun or killing anyone, you're pretty much good to go. Yup, it's pretty ridiculous but, that's Floriduh for you.

Here in Illinois we have to jump through hoops (and background checks to get a FOID card) just to be able to won a gun and if the law makers have their way we will never have conceal carry :faint:

kirbinster
02-24-2013, 15:12
I found this discussion very interesting as I too am a very new shooter. I am having some of the same problems as your wife. I know it is an anticipation thing that is causing me to tighten my grip and flinch. Not exactly sure how to overcome this. When I dry fire my G22 my sights don't budge at all. I can do it just about all day with a .22 case sitting on top of the front sight - it never falls. I even went out and bought a laser training pistol to use around the house for practice. I can shot down the length of a long hallway all the way across the living room and the laser makes a nice clean dot on the wall with little if any movement. But when I go out to the range the flinch is there.

I have been working on trying to pull the trigger very very slowly and that helps some as I am less sure when it will go bang. I have a 9mm conversion barrel (just got) that I am going to try this week as maybe I will be less apprehensive with it than the .40cal. I have very little problems with a .22cal, its just the bigger stuff that is haunting me right now. Any other suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

SARDG
02-24-2013, 17:19
...when I go out to the range the flinch is there.

I have been working on trying to pull the trigger very very slowly and that helps some as I am less sure when it will go bang. I have a 9mm conversion barrel (just got) that I am going to try this week as maybe I will be less apprehensive with it than the .40cal. I have very little problems with a .22cal, its just the bigger stuff that is haunting me right now. Any other suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
It's been mentioned above - try (quality) double hearing protection; both insert and muffs.

kirbinster
02-24-2013, 17:44
It's been mentioned above - try (quality) double hearing protection; both insert and muffs.

I've been using the foam insert plugs and then a set of muffs the range lends out on top of them. I just ordered my own set of electronic muffs.

Tom D
02-24-2013, 18:19
I am having some of the same problems as your wife. I know it is an anticipation thing that is causing me to tighten my grip and flinch.

I will pm you a link to the US Army Marksmanship Manual. Read the first three chapter (actually its all a great read). Something important in your post that caught my eye.

When your grip tightens your "grabbing" and creating a "choking grasp" and you flinch

How does this fit in with the problem of the flinch? There is an interaction with gripping that keys the brain to flinch. Part of over coming the flinch reaction is to over come the tightening of the grip reflex when you fire. Which comes first doesn't matter when you over come one you will overcome the other. What I have seen work with a number of shooters is simple.

"The pistol should be held by being gripped
normally, not by a choking grasp that endeavors to press on the stock in an all enveloping
grab." from Chapter one Section C. Grip (sub g)

So how does the grip help overcome the flinch. The manual is specific about the tightness of the grip. concentrate hard on your effort in maintaining an ALMOST choking grip, near trembling. You should grip tight enough to make you want the shot to be gone, not to be confused with rushing the shot.

If you tighten your grip after or as you fire the shot your not gripping tight enough to begin with. Your thinking about the wrong thing. Its very important that you almost choke it. When I finish a ten round string my hand hurts from the tightness and there is no thought to the rounds going off. Your mind is on sight control, gripping tight enough to just avoid the tremble, your hand will hurt just a little and no time for thought about recoil or noise. If your not thinking about it you wont do it (flinch).

Get the slack out of the trigger immediately no slow squeezing get the travel to the point you know will trigger the shot and make it. No dogging around. Get rid of the slack and get rid of the shot and take the next one with a very firm grip.

Big gun or little gun if your flinching your heads not in it. Think (concentrate) about control of your gun and the front sight with authority in how you hold the gun getting it right with your hand with authority .

The Manual goes into great detail about getting things right with your hand and the gun.

When in your mind you are in control you wont flinch. Let it start with how you hold your gun. You want to look forward to the next round and not concern yourself with the negative emotions that can take control, it makes you jerk or feel like a jerk.

PM coming

John B
02-24-2013, 18:23
The above advice is good, and remember time served and practice, practice, practice, is needed to be good at anything. A white belt with ten years experience is far more dangerous than a black belt with one.

cfrye11
02-24-2013, 18:29
Here is my advise . Get out of the range. Find a place where its safe and legal to shoot and you can have some fun.

Shoot some cans and other random targets . Fill them with water and letter rip. Try finding another lady for her to shoot with.

I find the range alone can make you nervous .

molan labe

Tom D
02-24-2013, 19:00
Here is my advise . Get out of the range. Find a place where its safe and legal to shoot and you can have some fun.

Shoot some cans and other random targets . Fill them with water and letter rip. Try finding another lady for her to shoot with.

I find the range alone can make you nervous .

molan labe

Yes great advice Ive dont like the range atmosphere everyone there want to help.
Get out with your hubby or a girl friend is a great idea and "kick the can down the road" it gets your head right. Lose the range if at all possible. You relax and have fun and concentrate on the tight grip.

kirbinster
02-24-2013, 20:20
Tom - thanks for the advice and the link. As far as "Getting out" well that is not possible as I live the People's Republic of New Jersey where if you fire a gun outside of a range you get the death penalty - twice :(

ithaca_deerslayer
02-24-2013, 21:08
I found this discussion very interesting as I too am a very new shooter. I am having some of the same problems as your wife. I know it is an anticipation thing that is causing me to tighten my grip and flinch. Not exactly sure how to overcome this. When I dry fire my G22 my sights don't budge at all. I can do it just about all day with a .22 case sitting on top of the front sight - it never falls. I even went out and bought a laser training pistol to use around the house for practice. I can shot down the length of a long hallway all the way across the living room and the laser makes a nice clean dot on the wall with little if any movement. But when I go out to the range the flinch is there.

I have been working on trying to pull the trigger very very slowly and that helps some as I am less sure when it will go bang. I have a 9mm conversion barrel (just got) that I am going to try this week as maybe I will be less apprehensive with it than the .40cal. I have very little problems with a .22cal, its just the bigger stuff that is haunting me right now. Any other suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

You have started to find the solution, for you, and for the OP's wife. It is called a "surprise break."

You don't want to know when the gun will fire. Point down range, align the sights, focus on the front sight, reducing movement of the whole sight picture, but mentally accepting that it will wobble around some. One half of your brain concentrates on keeping the sights aligned and on target.

The other half of your brain separately begins a slow, very slow, 30 seconds slow, steady trigger pull, like a train moving down the railroad tracks steady, but as slow as you can move it. With the Glock trigger, the spongy pressure builds but you keep pulling that trigger slowly. Eventually, but you don't know when, the gun goes BOOM!

Relax after that shot, perhaps hold the gun down pointing at a 45 degree angle, at the ground well in front of your feet, breathe, count in and out to 10, raise the gun up and align the sights and shoot again, just as slowly. I don't want you to know when the gun is going to fire. If you start to know, then slow the process down even more.

If you don't know when the gun is going to fire, then you won't be flinching. Trust me that eventually, weeks, months later, this process can be sped up to amazing speeds. When I shoot IDPA, a rapid timed competition, I'm still using a surprise break even though it may seem that I'm shooting rapid fire. This is especially true for those headshot scenarios.

Once you have learned the surprise break, then you test yourself every so often at the range with the dummy chamber drill. Easiest to do with a revolver where you leave one cylinder empty, but load the others, and turn it without looking then close and take those nice slow target shots. BOOM, BOOM, click. When it went "click" did the sights suddenly move off target? If they did you will feel like a fool and realize you flinched for no reason. Go back to a very slow trigger pull and repeat the drill, slowly, again. When the gun went "click" this time, did the sights go off target?

You can use a snapcap (dummy round) in a magazine to do the above dummy chamber drill with a semi-auto. Same procedure, but might help to have someone else load the mag for you. Also helps to have someone safely behind you video your shooting, so you can see later howuch the gun moves when you "click" :)

In my opinion, while dryfire practise, and grip and stance technique are all important, they are no substitute for the above combination of surprise break followed by occassional dummy chamber testing. Oh, by all means, go ahead and double up on ear plugs and ear muffs, to keep the noise out of the equation :)

Part of the surprise break may entail also learning to mentally accept the recoil. Hard to teach over the internet, but let the recoil happen. The gun is going to go BOOM and there will be muzzle blast and the barrel will rise up into the air. We know these things will happen. Let them happen. Accept them, in a Zen kind of moment just let it happen, don't try to stop it. Eventually, as you advance in your training, you try to control the recoil more so you can get quickly back on target. But for now, just let the recoil go up in the air, as long as you are keeping hold safely and not wacking yourself in the head, let that recoil happen :)

___________
I joined the NRA, have you yet?

Tom D
03-01-2013, 16:18
Tom - thanks for the advice and the link. As far as "Getting out" well that is not possible as I live the People's Republic of New Jersey where if you fire a gun outside of a range you get the death penalty - twice :(

I did a 6 month contract job in Mahwah and fell in love with NJ, the food was to die for, I went fly fishing on the weekends, the people were so nice, I visited a sporting goods store not far from the Hotel mostly to discuss areas to trout fish which finally led to the subject of guns................ What a shame. How could a place so good at pasta be so off their noodle.:rofl:

Cheri81
03-07-2013, 22:11
this is probably not good advice but it worked for me i got my new Glock 19 Friday and could not get it to cycle consistently and between the recoil and the flinching i was ready to scrap it all together when my husband had this bright idea to have me put 100 rounds through his 40 cal Hi-Point (which i have have shot several times before but only a clip now and then) and then he handed me the Glock and it was like shooting a 22 compared to his it cycled fine and no flinch

Just a thought...........

fnfalman
03-08-2013, 14:31
The reason why I prefer an informal range is that you can interspace bullseye with hard targets like clay pigeon or water filled soda bottles. Shoot at the bullseye target for basic marksmanship refinement then in between those sessions, switch to hard targets for some practical application fun.

Break up the monotony


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4Rules
06-25-2013, 16:10
Published on Mar 6, 2012
Becoming a CHLer is a big decision. You don't just get a license one day and walk out packing. There is some planning that needs to be done. I hope this video helps you ladies with that planning process. Practicing around the house is one of the best ways to get started.





Prepare to CHL by Bluejay9mm - YouTube

GotchaGlock
07-03-2013, 07:07
I would suggest an investment in one of the .22 cal. conversion kits for her Glock. This will give her practice with the smaller cal. along with the same trigger pull of her 9mm. She will feel the same trigger pull with the conversion and trigger time is always good! She will enjoy the smaller cal. on the same frame size. I would also suggest the ball and dummy exercise. Load her magazines for her, slipping in some dummy rounds with the live rounds. She will not know when the dummies are coming up. I would also suggest setting up a video camera beside her to video tape her reactions. This will show her visually what she is doing wrong. The ball and dummy exercise is also great for stoppage drills teaching her how to fix the malfunction and get back in the fight!

surfcommando
07-03-2013, 07:07
I love my Glock pistols, which I have owned for 20 years, and don't mean to blaspheme on this forum. However, you need to get your wife a single/double action pistol (Sig or HK) with decocker. (Forget the pea shooter .22, which will not protect her when you are not around.) This will significantly reduce the force needed to pull the trigger (after cocking & on follow-up shots), which will improve your wife's accuracy and confidence. After shooting different makes and models, my wife, my girlfriend and a female client all preferred my HK P2000SK sub-compact, which is an excellent carry gun that holds 9 rounds of .40 in the mag like a Glock 27.

mleeber
07-03-2013, 08:01
4Rules nailed it and SARDG's 110% right that Women do far better with a woman instruction in a class full of women! PM me and I will give you the name and number of the lady who runs Women on Target, the NRA program for women. If she is not going to be in TX soon I am sure she can refer you to someone. The only other advice I will give is that 99% of the time a Glock has too big a grip for a woman to feel like they can comfortably hold. Take your wife to a range where they have a wide selection of demo/rental guns in 9mm or 380 (preferably outdoors and not a wide selection of Glocks but a wide selection including M&Ps, XDs and Kahrs!!!), do it during off hours so there is no pressure from the throngs of onlookers, and spend the first 45 minutes to an hour just letting her hold the different guns. I would even grab the slides while she is holding each one and move it around. Then let her shoot the one that felt the most stable in her hand. But the first thing I would do is get her into a Women on Target class. Some of the info may be a repeat of what you have taught her but once on the firing line she will feel much more confident and far less pressure.

audiomechanic
07-03-2013, 08:19
I guess I should have replied to this thread a bit ago and updated you guys. Sorry. Lol

So, we are apparently one of the odd couples where I can actually teach her things, because she did get used to the Glock and enjoys shooting it now. She's been to the range several times by herself and has even taken the Texas CHL course. She took a women only class and was one of the highest scorers in the class for written and shooting proficiency. She's been carrying her Glock daily for about a month now and loves it! She's no sharp shooter, but neither am I and we both can benefit from additional training which we're planning on doing soon. Some practical and tactical training. Should be fun!

Anyway, I thank you all for your advice! You have helped make another woman a confident concealed weapon carrier! :D

Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2

Robin98
07-03-2013, 10:22
I had the same problem myself. I have been shooting since I was 6 years old and now at 66 years, I've had just about every problem in the book. Here is what I think may be a unique solution....
I love shooting my .45 and 44 Magnum, but I have the flinch problem that scatters my shots all over the target. A few years ago, I bought a 500 Magnum. Whoof! That thing kicks like a mule on steroids. Even holding on with both hands, it will rock your world. Well after a cylinder or two of 400 grain loads at 1400 fps, I would switch back to the 44 Magnum. A miracle! No flinch. In fact even the hottest 44 loads felt like shooting a 22 LR after that 500 beast.
No, I'm not recommending dropping $1200 on a cure, but maybe a few hot loads from a .45 ACP or even a 44 Magnum and then dropping back to the 9mm might cure the problem. Hey, it's worth a shot. Right?

nu2glock
07-03-2013, 13:27
Congrats on here proficiency and new confidence. Now you should start getting her to come to some competitions. I had a hard time getting my wife started in competition, but now she is a GSSF monster and does steel challenge and USPSA too. It will build her confidence and skill set over time. My wife now travels to numerous states out here in the west to do GSSF and USPSA, lots of work for me doing ammo and armorer duties.

BTW, I think the women's only courses depend on who is teaching them. I know of some that turned into just social gatherings with not much training or shooting done. I also know of some mixed gender courses that were very woman friendly. It all depends on instructor and other people in class. Glad she had a positive experience though.

audiomechanic
07-03-2013, 13:29
Thanks!

Competitions sound like a great idea! Will definitely look into that.

Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2

kussor
07-04-2013, 15:31
I've seen such a "cure" make a flinch a LOT worse, too. I dumped a 1970's saw handled .44 Contender cause its thumbrest wouldn't let me shoot it left handed, and it was ruining my combat match scores ( 1911, which I shoot right handed.)

Lone_Wolfe
07-09-2013, 01:49
I had the same problem myself. I have been shooting since I was 6 years old and now at 66 years, I've had just about every problem in the book. Here is what I think may be a unique solution....
I love shooting my .45 and 44 Magnum, but I have the flinch problem that scatters my shots all over the target. A few years ago, I bought a 500 Magnum. Whoof! That thing kicks like a mule on steroids. Even holding on with both hands, it will rock your world. Well after a cylinder or two of 400 grain loads at 1400 fps, I would switch back to the 44 Magnum. A miracle! No flinch. In fact even the hottest 44 loads felt like shooting a 22 LR after that 500 beast.
No, I'm not recommending dropping $1200 on a cure, but maybe a few hot loads from a .45 ACP or even a 44 Magnum and then dropping back to the 9mm might cure the problem. Hey, it's worth a shot. Right?

Several years ago that exact gun cured my flinch, too.