1911 do's and don't? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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bobbss
01-05-2013, 16:09
I just picked up my new TRP yesterday,which is my first 1911.I was looking at the manual,and it says to never release the slide on an empty chamber,which I've already done a several times.I hope that their not so fragile that I would of hurt something already.I'm more worried about the don't than the do's,but is there anything else I should know,like is it ok to dry fire?Thanks!

sawgrass
01-05-2013, 16:16
Bob I've been reading/studying a book called "The Colt .45 Automatic, A Shop Manual" by Jerry Kuhnhausen.

At the beginning of the book he has 18 rules.

Rule # 12 is: LIMIT .45 auto dry firing-no matter who says it's O.K.

I've adopted that rule as one of my own.

fnfalman
01-05-2013, 17:11
Don't make a habit out of dropping the slide onto an empty chamber on any gun and not just M1911. However, if the gun; any gun, were to break after a few slide drops then it's the gun is the problem. No decent pistol should be that fragile.

glock2740
01-05-2013, 17:16
Don't make a habit out of dropping the slide onto an empty chamber on any gun and not just M1911. However, if the gun; any gun, were to break after a few slide drops then it's the gun is the problem. No decent pistol should be that fragile.
This I agree with. No sense in beating a gun to death, but a few doesn't hurt anything. And if you think they don't drop the slide on an empty chamber MANY times when they are building a gun, you are wrong.
Bob I've been reading/studying a book called "The Colt .45 Automatic, A Shop Manual" by Jerry Kuhnhaus

At the beginning of the book he has 18 rules.

Rule # 12 is: LIMIT .45 auto dry firing-no matter who says it's O.K.

I've adopted that rule as one of my own.
This, I totally disagree with. On a rimfire gun, I will agree. But not on a centerfire.

sawgrass
01-05-2013, 17:25
This I agree with. No sense in beating a gun to death, but a few doesn't hurt anything. And if you think they don't drop the slide on an empty chamber MANY times when they are building a gun, you are wrong.

This, I totally disagree with. On a rimfire gun, I will agree. But not on a centerfire.

You kinda been that way today...:whistling::hugs:

Why do you think he says that?
I've only heard it regarding rimfires previously.

Is there something about a 1911 that would make him print that?

A defensive instructor gave me homework of sitting and dry firing my Glock to practice trigger take up/reset.

Markel
01-05-2013, 19:30
Read this .....

http://www.10-8consulting.com/article_page.php?articleID=13

fnfalman
01-05-2013, 22:05
Get some snap caps if people are that worried about dry firing.

Ruggles
01-05-2013, 22:23
Congrats on the fine 1911 :)

I agree doing it a number of times is no biggie, doing it over and over is not some thing I would do. I easy my close on my 1911s.

bobbss
01-06-2013, 09:06
Congrats on the fine 1911 :)

I agree doing it a number of times is no biggie, doing it over and over is not some thing I would do. I easy my close on my 1911s.

Thanks,and thanks to everyone for the info.

Mad Ryan
01-06-2013, 11:27
If you drop the slide on an empty chamber without the trigger pulled the sear is engaged which means it basically bounces off the engagement surfaces of the hammer. If you previously had a really nice trigger job it batters that all to hell.

If your hammer hooks have been filed down enough, as in a super light match trigger pull, it can cause the hammer to follow and hopefully get caught on the hooks.

bac1023
01-07-2013, 15:52
A few times shouldn't be an issue, but it's just a bad habit. I don't do it to any of my autos.

Rinspeed
01-07-2013, 19:30
The biggest "don't" about buying a 1911 is spending big bucks on one, posting multiple times how great it is, and then selling it a year later... after only putting 300 rounds through it. :upeyes: :upeyes:

GlockinNJ
01-07-2013, 19:37
A defensive instructor gave me homework of sitting and dry firing my Glock to practice trigger take up/reset.

Like fnfalman says, get some snap caps. Then, practice all you want.

sawgrass
01-07-2013, 19:46
Like fnfalman says, get some snap caps. Then, practice all you want.

My 1911's don't have trigger take up. No benefit.

GlockinNJ
01-07-2013, 19:52
My 1911's don't have trigger take up. No benefit.

Then how do you dry fire your 1911? Besides, didn't you say your instructor told you to dry fire your Glock?

bobbss
01-07-2013, 20:01
The biggest "don't" about buying a 1911 is spending big bucks on one, posting multiple times how great it is, and then selling it a year later... after only putting 300 rounds through it. :upeyes: :upeyes:

I don't see me doing that,the gun would really have to suck.I never sell guns,I don't have enough of them now.lol!If I start wanting something new I just wait till I can buy it.

sawgrass
01-07-2013, 20:28
Then how do you dry fire your 1911? Besides, didn't you say your instructor told you to dry fire your Glock?

I dry fire my 1911's once or twice when purchasing after asking permission. I dry fire them after cleaning once or twice to make sure that I put them back together properly.

I sit and dry fire my Glocks for practice because for a brief time I had a slight pull. The instructor had me sit and practice and practice and practice taking up the the trigger between shots so that I stayed on target. It got rid of the pull.

I don't think we have a definitive answer as to whether or not it harms a 1911 to dry fire it. The book that I'm reading says to LIMIT the amt. of dry firing with a 1911.
I don't really know why. I've heard my whole life that it might peen the chamber face or break the firing pin on a rimfire.

Markel
01-07-2013, 20:47
I don't think we have a definitive answer as to whether or not it harms a 1911 to dry fire it. The book that I'm reading says to LIMIT the amt. of dry firing with a 1911.

Definitive answer (Hilton Yam of 10-8 Consulting):

http://i1264.photobucket.com/albums/jj499/Markel51/HiltonYamQuote.png

More definitive answers here:

http://www.10-8consulting.com/article_page.php?articleID=13

sawgrass
01-07-2013, 20:57
So I think that proves fnfalman's point. If anyone wants to do it and has hesitation use snap caps.

One author says no problem another author says limit it.

Nothing different than any other day on the internet.

For me personally, I don't know enough to be sure so I would rather err on the side of caution.

Markel I saved that whole thing and intend to print it.
There is a lot of useful information there.
Thanks for sharing it.

I will add that after nearly 30 years of being a mechanic it's best to gather as much information as you can and make up your own mind based upon your own experiences.

faawrenchbndr
01-08-2013, 07:41
Great info Sawgrass,.......I completely agree. SnapCaps are
a whole lot of cheap insurance! :cool:

brisk21
01-08-2013, 08:20
Yeah I really don't like slamming the slide on an empty chamber. I think its less of an issue with a Glock style gun, but I still don't do it.

SDGlock23
01-08-2013, 09:23
Say no to idiot marks.

bobbss
01-08-2013, 09:37
I won't slam or make a habbit of dry firing and I'll probably get some snap caps.

fnfalman
01-08-2013, 09:48
Sawgrass, your M1911's trigger has zero take-up? That's an interesting configuration. Most autos tend to have a bit of take-up, even with a good trigger job. I personally don't really care unless the take-up is too long and sloppy.

As far as .22LR pistols go, it all depends on the handguns. The Browning Buckmark manual does not mention dry firing at all but said not to fire even though the gun is empty, but it's because of safety reasons and not of mechanical reason. The Ruger SR22 for example is dry fireable according to the operator's manual. However, I'd suggest to use snap caps even though it may be OK per the manufacturer, not or specifically forbidden. Snap caps are dirt cheap investments.

G36_Me
01-08-2013, 11:57
for what its worth...
Back in the day, my coach was from the Army Marksmanship Unit team. She had a 1911 dedicated to dry firing that had a lead filled mag.

She reco'd using it for the 1000s of reps of dry firing vs. our real range firearms. It was awesome. The gun was never used for live fire.

prez1967
01-08-2013, 14:35
I would learn the proper way to remove the barrel bushing during dissasembly.

Many rotate the barrel bushing while the pistol is locked up... The "correct" way to disassemble a 1911 pistol, so to preserve the fit of the bushing to the barrel, is to remove the slide first, push the barrel forward so its not tightly locked into the bushing then rotate the bushing.

I dont know how well i discribed the process but others will chime in and help if I missed something.

Mad Ryan
01-08-2013, 15:23
I would learn the proper way to remove the barrel bushing during dissasembly.

Many rotate the barrel bushing while the pistol is locked up... The "correct" way to disassemble a 1911 pistol, so to preserve the fit of the bushing to the barrel, is to remove the slide first, push the barrel forward so its not tightly locked into the bushing then rotate the bushing.

I dont know how well i discribed the process but others will chime in and help if I missed something.

Good point.

I never fit bushings that tight.

I can't shoot a pistol well enough to wring that much accuracy out of the thing, so a looser fit bushing is fine. I suspect that nobody, at least none of us mere mortals could shoot that well. I'd rather focus on the lugs and hood lockup and have a finger tight bushing.

sawgrass
01-08-2013, 15:50
Sawgrass, your M1911's trigger has zero take-up?

I was speaking relative to a Glock fnfalman. The pull went away after practicing trigger take-up in the Glock.

bobbss
01-08-2013, 16:41
I picked up some snap caps on my way home today.

fnfalman
01-08-2013, 17:12
I was speaking relative to a Glock fnfalman. The pull went away after practicing trigger take-up in the Glock.

I was just curious, that's all. The only M1911 that I experienced with zero trigger take-up was a pistol modifed by the Army MTU for target shooting.

sawgrass
01-08-2013, 18:03
I was just curious, that's all. The only M1911 that I experienced with zero trigger take-up was a pistol modifed by the Army MTU for target shooting.

The couple of better triggers on my 1911's shoot. And if your aren't paying attention you might shoot before you are expecting it. Where as the Glocks, you have plenty of time to 'get ready'. So comparatively it's quite different.

I shoot a 1911 better than anything else.

bobbss that's great that you picked up some snap caps.
I finally got new 1911 that I've been waiting for and I wish I had a few snap caps myself. I was so dang excited today that I forgot.

I took the gun apart, and reassembled it as described in what Markel shared here. It was great.

COLDSTEEL165
01-25-2013, 17:40
Markel thanks for the Heads up 1911 Article . some great tips there.

ca survivor
01-26-2013, 15:19
I would learn the proper way to remove the barrel bushing during dissasembly.

Many rotate the barrel bushing while the pistol is locked up... The "correct" way to disassemble a 1911 pistol, so to preserve the fit of the bushing to the barrel, is to remove the slide first, push the barrel forward so its not tightly locked into the bushing then rotate the bushing.

I dont know how well i discribed the process but others will chime in and help if I missed something.

really? good to know.

Markel
01-27-2013, 05:26
Markel thanks for the Heads up 1911 Article . some great tips there.

You're welcome. :cool:

Here's a link to an updated version of the article, now including pictures:

https://www.10-8performance.com/pages/1911-User%27s-Guide.html

Also, check out the other excellent articles on the 10-8 Performance website:

http://www.10-8performance.com/pages/Articles.html

minderasr
01-27-2013, 08:31
Speaking of do's and dont's...I have a long standing disagreement with a friend/fellow shooter while shooting at the range. I was always taught to sling-shot the slide. He claims you should never do that, but always use the slide release.

Thoughts?

Rinspeed
01-27-2013, 08:53
Speaking of do's and dont's...I have a long standing disagreement with a friend/fellow shooter while shooting at the range. I was always taught to sling-shot the slide. He claims you should never do that, but always use the slide release.

Thoughts?



He couldn't be more wrong. :upeyes:

GWG19
01-27-2013, 08:54
It happens thousands of times every weekend at completions all across the US.
Drop the mag.
Show me clear.
Release the slide.