BHP Assistance [Archive] - Glock Talk

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hoghunter82
01-16-2013, 21:19
I get on strange tangents now and again on guns. Got the fever for a Browning Hi Power. I read through Mr. Camp's (RIP) website but my attention span is short so I turn to GT. I'm aware of the Mk II update with the "straight" feed ramp vs the earlier "hump" that may cause feed issues. Obviously I know what I'd get with a new Mk III version, but I would really prefer a older pure Belgian gun. It can be a bit intimidating looking for an older gun when you don't know a whole lot about what you are seeing (I know, do my homework). I've seen some for sale locally all in the $700-$800 range that appear to be '70s-'80s vintage. So to the BHP experts- are there a handful of things that a potential buyer ABSOLUTELY MUST know about the BHP before purchase to avoid getting taken for a fool? Thanks for any advice
PS- I'm a shooter, not a collector so anything I get will most certainly be shot- a lot.


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Cambo
01-16-2013, 21:46
For durability, you might want to go with 1990+ version. I have heard and read that earlier models may start to give out, especially loaded with +P. I have found that I shoot no other handgun as well as the Hi Power, not even my $1300 CZ Shadow. I absolutely cannot miss with it. You will not regret getting one.

hoghunter82
01-16-2013, 22:16
Thanks. I likely won't run +P in the gun at all. This is more of a "gotta have" gun and not so much a HD/SD weapon. But I will shoot the heck out of it. Only concern I have in handling one is the hammer bite. I got long hands and the web of my right hand is really close to that hammer. Like I mentioned, would really like to know if there are things to avoid or things to look for when evaluating a BHP.


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rgregoryb
01-16-2013, 22:33
the MKII was only made a few years in the 80's a transition from the earlier models to the MKIII. The MKIII has the firing pin block safety built into the sear lever and adding the mag safety it makes for an atrocious trigger.
the pre MKIIs ( T's, C's are beautiful guns but the sights suck big time) for nostalgia nothing beats a nice T series blued HP. for a shooter nothing beats a 90's MKIII with the epoxy finish.

Pre 62 guns have internal extractors which are in short supply if one breaks.

I shoot and build Hps for clients and my personal favorites are 90 model HPs, but that is just me. Go to gunbroker and search "High power" Gary Cole has dozens of HPs and he describes their condition well I have several from him.

I run +P in mine, but I do install 18.5 # recoil spring

hoghunter82
01-16-2013, 22:43
Thanks, rg. I appreciate the feedback. I'll check out the GB seller.


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rgregoryb
01-16-2013, 22:48
and there is a highpowertalk website

countrygun
01-16-2013, 22:50
I too miss Mr.Camp. I was exchanging e-mails with him about an HP project I was working on when he passed. I put the project off and will someday finish it as per his suggestions.

Berto
01-16-2013, 23:02
Really I'd go with the MKIII since it has all the features you'll want. The earliest MKIII's were forged until they discovered the need for better heat treat on the cast guns when offering the .40 S&W versions in the early to mid 90's.
The MKIII will also have the spurred hammer, which is less likely to nail your hand vs the rowel (commander) type on the earlier guns. It's also easier to shorten the spur if you need to.
From the late eighties on, they were made in Belgium/assembled in Portugal. The very earliest MKIII's were all Belgian, IIRC.

Nothing wrong with getting a MKII either, the feed ramp is an easy and quick fix, also fine with +P if you run the 18.5lb spring. It was +P+ SMG ammo that hurt the BHP....service guns too, often with worn springs, which could ruin any gun.

Still, for the BHP experience and all around shooter, just get a MKIII and be happy, they are excellent guns made for hard use.

joeG26er
01-23-2013, 21:30
anyone know the best touchup for slight bluing rub on these early hi powers?

raven11
01-23-2013, 22:23
Gary Cole has dozens of HPs and he describes their condition well I have several from him.


his prices are pretty fair compared to some of the other GB auctions for Hi-Powers i've seen

FireForged
01-24-2013, 11:01
I have a plain ole MKIII and a Practical model. People can say what they want about the trigger and I will admit that its not great but heck man, its a single action trigger pull. By the time your brain realizes that their is some grit to the pull, its already gone BANG! If you carry for self defense, I cant imagine how some minor git to the trigger is going to cause any issues at all. Now if you are trying to strike a match at 50 yards, well yeah... a less than perfect trigger can effect you there.

For the quality and reliability you receive in a BHP, I cant really complain about minor nuances.

bac1023
01-24-2013, 13:42
I too miss Mr.Camp. I was exchanging e-mails with him about an HP project I was working on when he passed. I put the project off and will someday finish it as per his suggestions.

It was certainly a shame. He was a great guy.

samuse
01-24-2013, 21:21
Yeah I miss Stephen Camp too. I think everyone does, he was a helluva good guy and left a lot of good reading on the net.

He helped me out when I was first getting into Hi Powers.

From experience, I recommend the early to mid '90s cast frame MK III 9mms.

The fit is better and the small parts seem to be of higher quality than the current ones.

maxmanta
01-25-2013, 20:34
If there are "ribs" on the butt of the grip behind the magazine, the gun has a cast frames. If it doesn't, it has a forged frame.

Cast vs forged is a heated topic in the BHP community. If falls to personal preference.

hoghunter82
01-25-2013, 20:38
If there are "ribs" on the butt of the grip behind the magazine, the gun has a cast frames. If it doesn't, it has a forged frame.

Cast vs forged is a heated topic in the BHP community. If falls to personal preference.

What is the prevailing thought on preference? Are the current new production ones cast or forged?


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samuse
01-25-2013, 21:44
What is the prevailing thought on preference? Are the current new production ones cast or forged?


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The cast ones are current. The original forged frames were found to be inadequate when they started chambering them in 40 S&W.

I like the cast frames because I like everything to be as tough as possible and I enjoy shooting my guns.

Some people (illogical purists) say the forged frames feel better in the hand but I've never been able to tell a difference.

Fed Five Oh
01-26-2013, 09:45
Since you want an older Belgium made HP, study up on the Browning serial numbers. There are some Fake HP's out there that were made by FEG in Hungary that are marked Browning made in Belgium. They look nice, but they are fakes.