Powder longgevity/stability [Archive] - Glock Talk

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nam02G
04-21-2014, 13:06
My brother approached me with a dilemma this weekend. He borrowed a rifle from his F-I-L to try out and was given some bullets along with it. He doesn't know the exact age of the bullets but suspects that they are from the mid to late 70's as his F-I-L has not shot the rifle in at least three decades. He does know that the bullets have been stored in a cool dry closet the entire time. They apparently look new. I told him that they are probably safe to use since they have been stored in a good environment. But I would run it by the forum members here. So what do you guys think? Okay to shoot or unsafe?

deadmanglocking
04-21-2014, 13:28
Shoot em if they look good.

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Taterhead
04-21-2014, 13:36
I would shoot them if factory ammo. If they are reloads, then I wouldn't. That is not because of powder age, but because I don't make a habit of shooting reloads loaded by others.

JohnnyE
04-21-2014, 13:40
I'm always extra cautious when there is the slightest question surrounding ammo. Be on the alert for a squib. The last thing to do is to send a round while the one before it is stuck somewhere in the pipe.

k7ant
04-21-2014, 13:46
If they look ok without any green or discoloring, I'd shoot them. I have shot lots
of old ammo especially old military stuff and the only time I have had a problem
was with corrosion (green scale) or badly discolored rounds. They either won't fire
or hang fire. If a round doesn't fire, leave it on the chamber for a couple of minutes
to make sure it's not a hang fire.:)

PCJim
04-21-2014, 14:36
FIL's rifle and ammo - if the FIL is comfortable enough to give both to your brother to use, the ammo should be good to go. If they weren't from the same source, no go.


Keep in mind that should anything go wrong, your brother will become his least loved SIL. Images of "Meet the Fockers" comes to mind.

JBnTX
04-21-2014, 16:10
1. Have your worst enemy hold the rifle.
2. Tie a 50ft string to the trigger and step back.
3. Pull the string.
4. If it's not raining body parts and pieces of rifle, then the ammo is good.

JohnnyE
04-21-2014, 16:29
This whole FIL/SIL thing...did the wedding involve a shotgun?? Has "eldest son" been mentioned? :kidding:

Rico567
04-21-2014, 18:28
The longevity and stability of the powder is not likely to be the issue here. Minimum powder age under normal conditions should be 40-50 years. As stated previously, the issue is likely to be the provenance of the cartridges. If in doubt, salvage them.

fredj338
04-21-2014, 19:54
I've got some 06 ammo from the 50s, still shoots.

hogfish
04-22-2014, 10:04
My brother approached me with a dilemma this weekend. He borrowed a rifle from his F-I-L to try out and was given some bullets along with it. He doesn't know the exact age of the bullets but suspects that they are from the mid to late 70's as his F-I-L has not shot the rifle in at least three decades. He does know that the bullets have been stored in a cool dry closet the entire time. They apparently look new. I told him that they are probably safe to use since they have been stored in a good environment. But I would run it by the forum members here. So what do you guys think? Okay to shoot or unsafe?

Bullets don't go bad. They might get tarnished if they're jacketed, but you can just wipe them off - even if they're green.

shotgunred
04-26-2014, 18:19
You can still buy Greek 30-06 surplus from wwII. It works just fine.

Michiglock
04-27-2014, 19:34
I have been shooting .357 mag rounds that I loaded in the early 1990's. All good