Dumb Question [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : Dumb Question


Angry Fist
05-22-2014, 19:24
Is it possible, in a pinch, to reload pistol rounds with black powder, and are there recipies? I'm not going to attempt that, but was just wondering. Cartridges were loaded with BP for awhile. Surely there is conversion data out there, as well as do's and don'ts. I suppose if SHTF, it's a viable option? :dunno:

CarryTexas
05-22-2014, 19:32
http://youtu.be/KfzQ4uKvE7c

vafish
05-22-2014, 19:42
Yep, fill the case full, no air space.

Angry Fist
05-22-2014, 19:43
No BTF issues there.... :rofl:

oldman11
05-22-2014, 19:58
It certainly isn't the best thing to do, but it's not a dumb question.

fredj338
05-22-2014, 20:30
He issue will be how long the gun will run with bp. Another reason everyone should own a 4" magnum, any caliber.

Steel Head
05-22-2014, 20:39
Kinda cool to see that!

Three-Five-Seven
05-22-2014, 20:45
You can run black powder in your guns -- all of 'em. All you have to do is fill the case to the bottom of the bullet, leaving no air space, and you're good to go.

BUT, you must thoroughly clean all petroleum lubricants from your gun and replace them with natural lubricants (Mobil 1 grease and oil are a good place to start).

AND, you must have bullets that are lubricated with a black powder compatible lubricant. (50/50 beeswax/crisco is a good place to start).

If you fail to use proper lubricants on your gun and bullets, fouling will quickly stop the gun and it's a pita to clean fouling that's been deposited with petroleum lubricants.

(p.s. We've had several guys run 1911 John Browning pistols for entire matches with black powder without problem -- observing the above caveats)

Angry Fist
05-22-2014, 22:40
Thanks for the replies, guys. What's the deal with the air space?

Three-Five-Seven
05-22-2014, 23:08
What's the deal with the air space?

Detonation can happen if there is air space in the charge column of a black powder load. This occurs if the charge ignites in more than one direction. The charge must burn sequentially from the bottom (primer) to the top for normal and proper ignition.

If it lights from two points, the two combustion waves can meet somewhere in the middle (of the case). The resulting collision of shock waves can cause a catastrophic explosion.

Angry Fist
05-22-2014, 23:09
:alex: Dang! Learn something every day.

Angry Fist
05-22-2014, 23:16
I have little experience with BP my friend has a .45 revolver I shot several times, but never loaded it. I thought they rammed the bullet for more pressure.

Three-Five-Seven
05-23-2014, 07:37
I thought they rammed the bullet for more pressure.

Compression of the powder charge is, of course, one way to insure that there is no air space inside the loaded cartridge.

Many shooters feel that by compressing the powder charge, more consistent internal ballistics can be achieved. This is particularly the case among Black Powder Cartridge Rifle Silhouette shooters, who often have loads that are single digit extreme spreads for ten rounds. These guys have some of the most consistent and accurate ammunition on Earth.

There is little benefit to extreme compression with pistol cartridges, however. Beyond assuring the loader that the charge has no air space, little else is achieved.

As a side note, be aware that many of the "substitute" powders will NOT tolerate any compression other than touching the top of the powder column with the bullet. Be sure to read directions carefully if you intend to use Triple Seven, Pyrodex or other "subs".

Angry Fist
05-23-2014, 17:07
Compression of the powder charge is, of course, one way to insure that there is no air space inside the loaded cartridge.

Many shooters feel that by compressing the powder charge, more consistent internal ballistics can be achieved. This is particularly the case among Black Powder Cartridge Rifle Silhouette shooters, who often have loads that are single digit extreme spreads for ten rounds. These guys have some of the most consistent and accurate ammunition on Earth.

There is little benefit to extreme compression with pistol cartridges, however. Beyond assuring the loader that the charge has no air space, little else is achieved.

As a side note, be aware that many of the "substitute" powders will NOT tolerate any compression other than touching the top of the powder column with the bullet. Be sure to read directions carefully if you intend to use Triple Seven, Pyrodex or other "subs".
I'm planning on getting my first muzzleloader this summer, and appreciate the info! Nice knowing a Glock can do it in a pinch.