My most scary moment [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Texas T
12-07-2003, 21:07
I was doing some cross-countries with my instructor and we had just done a touch & go at an uncontrolled strip in Turlock, south of Modesto. As we lifted off and were gaining altitude on our way back to MOD we had a Cessna fly right under us, left to right, no more than 50 feet below us. I never saw him coming. ;P


T

F14Scott
12-07-2003, 22:12
There I was...

marshalling at night above Independence during some December carrier quals on a black as a bag of ___holes, cold water, freezing rain night. Waiting for our turn to come down, I had out my flashlight and looked for ice on the wings or, more tellingly (we thought), the AIM-9 blue tube's seeker head. Seeing none, we thought we were OK.

Down the chute we went and made a nice pass to a two wire. When we hit the deck, the unseen ice that had built up on both intakes dislodged and was immediately ingested, giving us, Ba-BOOM...Ba-BOOM, dual engine compressor stalls with some impressive 40 foot flames belching forward of the jet. Instead of the standard military power ROOOOOAAAAAARRRRRRR in the wires, we decelerated to the LSOs' screaming POWER POWER POWER POWER and the motors going BEEEEEeeeewwwww. I put my hand on the handle for the second time in my life. Then we stopped. And everything went silent. My pilot cycled the throttles to idle and then back to mil, and we got the ROOOOOAAAAAARRRRRR we wanted about ten seconds too late. We throttled back, taxied out, they stuffed us, and sent everybody else back to the beach for the night. I had to sit in the jet for a minute or so before my legs worked well enough to climb down the ladder and get my slider.

My buddies behind me coming down said they saw the two explosions and thought for sure they were our seats leaving the jet. Then, when they got sent home, they thought for sure we had ejected. Luckily, we talked to a couple of them on the radios as they were departing (to warn them of the ice) and they were able to tell our wives we were fine but they had cancelled the rest of the event for WX. Interestingly, a Tomcat from our sister squadron had landed just before us and had FODded both of its motors bad enough that it needed them both swapped, but had not stalled or had any indications of the FODs in the cockpit.

Texas T
12-07-2003, 22:22
Scott, I'm sure that ranked right up at the top of your pucker factor scale! ;f

Here is a link to one of the most interesting (and scary) aviation stories I've ever read. The BN on an A-6 experiences a partial ejection (unintended); goes part way through the canopy; and his pilot brings him home to the carrier (he survives).

http://www.gallagher.com/ejection_seat/


T

BillCola
12-07-2003, 23:32
Originally posted by Texas T
I was doing some cross-countries with my instructor and we had just done a touch & go at an uncontrolled strip in Turlock, south of Modesto. As we lifted off and were gaining altitude on our way back to MOD we had a Cessna fly right under us, left to right, no more than 50 feet below us. I never saw him coming. ;P


T

I had an almost identical experience on my first lesson!! C150 over SF Bay, I was loooking down at the water at what I thought was our aircraft's shadow. All about the same time I pondered why the shadow appeared to be moving 90° from L to R, my CFI has the yoke back in his chest, a V Bonanza wobbles by right under our cowling... 100 feet, max. The day's lesson was OH-VAH!

glocknsail
12-07-2003, 23:49
Originally posted by BillCola
I had an almost identical experience on my first lesson!! C150 over SF Bay, I was loooking down at the water at what I thought was our aircraft's shadow. All about the same time I pondered why the shadow appeared to be moving 90° from L to R, my CFI has the yoke back in his chest, a V Bonanza wobbles by right under our cowling... 100 feet, max. The day's lesson was OH-VAH!

Proper call out; "I got the Doctor in sight."

BillCola
12-07-2003, 23:57
Ah! But I got off track. That wasn't my MSM. (I figure we can talk in acronyms & stuff here, right? ;f

1987. November or December, about 0200..clear, cold night, departing South Lake Tahoe, CA in a T-210. Just me and a hottie who I was grooming.

Get out of the limo at the FBO and do a cursory update of the WX, as we had just arrived there a few hours before. Some strong gusts came up out of nowhere and died just as fast, to dead calm. I got the total creeps, and totally ignored them. (Procedure subsequently modified.) Line guy points to a parked 421 and says out how it weathervaned on the ramp short while ago. ;P No PIREPS, just a little extra breezy over the pass.

I decided to depart with about a 10kt tailwind over the lake, -vs- into the black granite canyons. No problem, 8500' RWY (field elev 6264) but it's cold and I'm light. I figure I'll abort if not pos rate, wheels up mid-field. Goes as planned... except for once at about 200'AGL I hit the most extreme turbulence I've ever even dreamed of!! Full aileron deflection did not even keep it upright. All 3 axes, airspeed is all over the map, and my most cogent thought was "wonder what that ice-cold water's gonna feel like when we hit..."

Nevertheless, we did climb, as the madness continued. Mid-lake, about 10 miles from the field, we hit the up-elevator. 9000,10000,11,12,13,14000 in maybe a minute. (Yeah, I know, I know, F14Scott. :) ) I strap masks on myself and my poor passenger who is probably having nightmares to this day. I kept the free altitude and maintained my climb as I awaited the arrival of the updraft's evil twin. Moment's later, we crossed the crest of the Sierra, and it was smooth as glass the rest of the way to the Bay Area. That was when my leg started shaking. I was still a little messed up on the arrival, as evidenced by my setting up for the wrong airport. Made a good save
and called it a night.

BillCola
12-07-2003, 23:59
Originally posted by glocknsail
Proper call out; "I got the Doctor in sight."

~1 ~1 ~1

Bushflyr
12-08-2003, 08:24
Originally posted by glocknsail
Proper call out; "I got the Doctor in sight."
2 captains in a DC-9, a doctor in a bonanza, and a flight attendant with a chipped tooth.;P

HerrGlock
12-08-2003, 10:00
Few of 'em that -er- I heard about.

1) Hurricaine Andrew relief. Flying into Miami International, about 3 miles off the end of the runway, inbound. Airports don't like helicopters in the pattern much so they clear us to straight in as long as we stay the heck out of the "real" flight paths. Most of our flying there for the month was about 200-500' AGL so the lord high muckety-mucks we flew could see the devistation.

757 was on final and tower asked us if we had it in sight and could maintain separation. Of course we could, saw it and was about a mile north of the centerline and was landing North, so we would never cross.

Well, wing tip vortex is a bear, lemme tell you. I went from about 150' over the rooftops to looking at some TV antennas at eye level. I was hoping that I would get bite before spreading the skids on the building tops.

2) NVG (night vision goggle) training flight. Went and updated the wire hazards off the Ops map. Close to 0% illum night. I don't care what the regs say, I tend to update before every goggle flight.

NOE, I was flying and the kid was navigating. He was right on course and I'd flown this about a week ago with another kid.

SOMEONE put high tension wires up in the middle of the NOE route, no lights on the towers, no "Oh by the way" to Operations (these were in the middle of a training area) nothing.

Hard bank, go into demonstration of confined area landing, get out and we smoked almost a pack of cigerettes before we calmed down enough to fly back home. Holy COW.

I'll throw a few more in here as I think about it. 12 years puts one in a number of situations and some of them are funny.... NOW.

DanH

hapuna
12-08-2003, 18:07
THere was a wonderful writeup somewhere of a guy just south of Portland when Mt. St. Helens blew. He had the sense to turn into the shock wave. Don't think I would have had the presence to do that.

On another story however...its really perception that leaves the impact. In 2000 I flew my wife and I to Monterrey from Seattle for the 100th US Open. The worst part was getting out of Seattle in hard clag which wore my wife out so she wanted to land in Redmond OR which we did. I had gas put in even though I wasn't planning on it and we took off VFR. I switched to burn the right gas tank down and was going to both 30 min. later.
As we passed over Redding CA. we became a glider very suddenly. I realized I hadn't switched back to both and within 15 seconds had the engine running again. We were at 8500ft and probably lost 20ft.
My wife was totally freaked out and was not able to function for the rest of the flight. Even though she now knows we weren't in danger it is still something that frightens her (she is very interested in how much gas we have on the plane now).

Texas T
12-08-2003, 19:16
Originally posted by hapuna
(she is very interested in how much gas we have on the plane now). It's always a good thing to have another set of eyes on the gauges, isn't it? :)

I was on about my 4th training flight when all of a sudden my instructor takes the yoke and says "I got it". Thinking I had done something incredibly stupid I let go and kept my mouth shut. He pointed to the oil temp gauge sitting at the top of the red while he started talking to the tower about a straight-in approach. We were only about 5 miles out but we were only up about 1500 agl so there is no way we would have made it if the engine had died.

I improved my instrument scan by a measure of ten after that. ;)


T

S2CPitts
12-09-2003, 21:00
Every textbook short-field landing in the T-41... ;P

M2 Carbine
12-10-2003, 23:15
This is one of my wife's scary stories.

In the early 60's she was taking dual in a Piper Colt and was close to solo.
She had been doing touch and go's for a while. Then she taxi's in.
The instructor gets out and away she goes for her three landings.
She does three beautiful uneventful landings.

On the drive home I'm as proud as I can be of her, but she tells me she was right scared.

The instructor was warning her about being careful coming over the high trees at the end of the runway and hit one.
On my wife's next landing the instructor gets out and sends her solo.

It turned out the plane had fabric damage near the tail.
The FBO chewed out the instructor.
And, my wife kept me from killing him.:(

Skyhook
12-11-2003, 08:51
Returning from an open house at PAFB I was flying as the base controller vectored us directly into a series of storm cells in the center of the Adirondack Mtns. It was nighttime and the lightning was in sheets. The rain was so heavy we had to scream at each other's ear to be heard and then-- total electrical failure. It was flashlight, needle, ball and worthless airspeed (the needle was pegging one limit to another).
The back seater was in pain as he had stepped upon a bee in the tall grass that afternoon resting his feet from the pinch of the new uniform shoes... his foot was incredibly swollen.
The last contact we had was with Albany (ALB) tower telling us to head directly east-- that was where the worst of the flashes were! I went south. After flying in violent up- downdrafts for about two hours -on a trip which should have lasted about 45 min., we broke out of the stuff in Saratoga, NY and landed. The wind was violent enough to require 'all hands' to man the ropes to tie the bucking C-172 down. My wife drove the distance to retrieve us and all I remember is being extremely tired and deaf as a rock.
During the flight brief, the base personnel remarked to my question of the Towering Cs we could see in the distance... "They're nothing; will dissipate by the time you get there."
Never get directions from a native, I say.;Q

GeorgeAtl
12-11-2003, 09:01
I was taking Private Pilot course at ERAU, back in the early 70's. I was out on a solo, practicing what I thought were accelerated stalls in the North Practice area, north of Daytona.

Had the plane in a left bank, pulling back on the yoke, and all of a sudden, I'm looking down at the sky, and up at the ground!! With no clue how to get out of it!! Came back hard right with the aileron, with no results. As I got to full right alieron, I kicked in the right rudder, and we came back straight & level...or close to it.

After I stopped shaking somewhat...I pulled out a cigarette. Came back before my hour was up.....Instructor was in the flight center, and we talked about what happened. He said it was a slip.

What was it, anyway??

Skyhook
12-11-2003, 09:12
GeorgeAtl, that sounds like a typical flop-over caused by stalling while in a cross-controlled configuration(?)...
My old T-34 used to pop-over the top so fast with that maneuver (and every year I'd have to demonstrate recovery from that within 100')that you almost always banged your head against the side of the canopy. Fun.;f

M2 Carbine
12-11-2003, 09:39
GeorgeAtl

It sounds like you snapped over the top into the beginning of a spin.

You didn't say what plane you were flying but the Cessna 150 and Tri-Pacer will snap over the top into a nice spin, from a slightly uncoordinated accelerated turning stall.

I even had my old Stinson snap over the top when I was pulling it around to hard in about a 110 degree bank.;Q

GeorgeAtl
12-11-2003, 09:44
Originally posted by M2 Carbine
GeorgeAtl


You didn't say what plane you were flying but the Cessna 150 and Tri-Pacer will snap over the top into a nice spin, from a slightly uncoordinated accelerated turning stall.

I even had my old Stinson snap over the top when I was pulling it around to hard in about a 110 degree bank.;Q

I was in a 172....the cornerstone of the ERAU fleet!!

Yeah, it was probably a spin...and I had no idea how to get out of it....but the rudder that I kicked in after the aileron did nothing....that's what brought me back S&L.

M2 Carbine
12-11-2003, 09:52
GeorgeAtl

When I was instructing fixed wing we stripped a 172 of the gyros and used it as our spin ship. We had a lot of CFI training and they had to do a 3 turn spin on their check rides. I don't know what the requirement is today.

The only way we could get the 172 to stay in a spin was carry a case of oil in the back.
The 150's did a beautiful spin but we had to keep the gyros in them for training.

GeorgeAtl
12-11-2003, 09:57
a W/B issue for that, huh??? Case of Oil? Where? behind the back seat??

Yeah, that was One thing I learned by myself under stress.....the spin recovery!!!

Talk about checking my shorts afterwards!!

M2 Carbine
12-11-2003, 10:35
GeorgeAtl
Ya, the oil tied down behind the back seat was enough to keep it spinning.

A friend had a scary flight that started off something like yours.

He was a student flying a Piper Colt.
He was the kind of guy that pushed the envelope in everything he did.
He wanted to do spins so one day I went up with him (I was still a Private Pilot)and showed him a couple spins.
I told him not to do them by himself but I knew he would. So I told him to pull full stick and full right rudder from a nice level flat poweroff stall.
Then I said get a lot of altitude.

He called me a couple days later. He was still shaking.
He said he climed to 3,000 then thought of what I said so he went to 4000 feet. (over the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland).

Now he's not sure how he did it but the plane was on it's back falling. Scared now, he had all the controls centered.
I said, no problem, all you had to do is pull the stick back.
He said by the time he figured that out, the nose was straight down in a hell of a dive.
The only thing he did right was not yank the stick back and pull the wings off.

He said he knew he couldn't pull it out too fast but he said by the time he was level he was 250 feet above the water.

That was the end of his solo spinning;f

GeorgeAtl
12-11-2003, 10:41
Damn!!

My story doesn't hold a candle to that one!! Wow!!

Over Water, no less....

M2 Carbine
12-11-2003, 10:59
A few years later the same friend wanted me to ride with him in a Cessna 150 Aerobat (I think they were called).

I knew he wanted to wring me out for all the things I had done to him.
So we put on parachutes and he flew.

About 3,000 feet I saw him slowing the A/S to Maneuvering Speed so I knew it was coming.

He yanked back the stick and pushed full right rudder.

His seat broke and he slid back to the baggage compartment still holding on to the stick.

We were doing Snap Rolls from hell.

I don't know how many we did but shortly we were spinning straight down.

He's got a death grip on the stick and I'm yelling, Get the **** off the controls.

He says can you land it and I keep yelling, Ya, if you get the **** off the controls.

Well, he does and I do.

Then he wants to get the seat fixed and go back up again.;f

GeorgeAtl
12-11-2003, 11:10
M2...

With friends like that...who needs enemies?

Did he have a death wish? Or was he just trying some good old "one-upmanship?"

M2 Carbine
12-11-2003, 11:37
GeorgeAtl

He was just a wild guy.
In the Navy he had to get in Submarines.

He built a nice Kit Fox. I have the video of him test flying it.
When he died he owned a Long Easy, which he was racing.
Shortly before he died he was racing cars and had to carry an oxygen bottle with him to help him breath.

As young kids his mother used to say I was a bad influence on him and my Grandmother used to say he was a bad influence on me. :)


I think in WW2 he would have been a hell of a Mustang pilot.

Patriot328
12-11-2003, 18:30
Originally posted by GeorgeAtl
I was taking Private Pilot course at ERAU, back in the early 70's. I was out on a solo, practicing what I thought were accelerated stalls in the North Practice area, north of Daytona.

Had the plane in a left bank, pulling back on the yoke, and all of a sudden, I'm looking down at the sky, and up at the ground!! With no clue how to get out of it!! Came back hard right with the aileron, with no results. As I got to full right alieron, I kicked in the right rudder, and we came back straight & level...or close to it.

After I stopped shaking somewhat...I pulled out a cigarette. Came back before my hour was up.....Instructor was in the flight center, and we talked about what happened. He said it was a slip.

What was it, anyway??

Another Riddle Rat!!! North practice area.. I was about 20 years behind you, but it's all still there.

It sounds like you just spun the plane, or at least started to. Stalled when you weren't coordinated, which would cause the windscreen to fill up with ground. I had the same thing happen to a student when I was teaching power on stalls to them back in school. It was in a tampico (not very spin friendly.. prohibited, in fact). Stalled the a/c uncoordinated and the nose started to drop to the left rather quickly.. he just looked at me and I asked him "are you going to step on the right rudder or what?" That was enough to get his brain going and he exited it very well. Was a good learning experience.

tSuperflyTNT
12-12-2003, 01:05
My most scary moment......

When I realized a college degree and a FlightSafety Academy education was just enough to get a job at an FBO.........

PUMPING GAS

And then realizing my 6 mos grace period was up on my FlightSafety Academy loan and i wasn't even day current in a 172.

still scared...but i'm not going to sit in an office all day - that's for sure ^d

M2 Carbine
12-12-2003, 10:58
I’ve had a number if times that I’ve been in trouble and knew it but a few times I was in a lot of trouble and didn’t know how bad it was.

I was flying this Bell 206L a hundred miles out in the Gulf of Mexico, for Cities Service Oil Co.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid93/pfc2e920989a23c9440fa5c861a80fd36/fa518af2.jpg

There were five manned production platforms that I was flying to out of Galveston.

I shut down on one,(the one in the picture) before “making the field” and heading back to Galveston with a man that wasn’t feeling well.

A helicopter main rotor blade should turn both ways when the engine is shut down, so I always turned the blade backwards to tie it down.
The blade wouldn’t turn backwards.
To shorten the story,
It seemed to be a dragging rotor brake, which was corrected.

I flew to another platform and picked up the sick man going to Galveston.
In about four minutes the aircraft yawed back and forth violently, made some noise then settled down.

The man in the back was a little concerned.

If there is a problem in a helicopter’s tail rotor drive system it will most times show up in the tail rotor pedals as a vibration.
My pedals were smooth.

I landed at a Cities Service platform about 8 miles away and called “roving maintenance”.
The mechanic couldn’t see anything wrong with the rotor brake, so he asked me to run it up while he watched.

About the time I lit off the engine the mechanic came running around yelling, Shut it off, shut it off.
As I shut the engine down I was yelling, What’s wrong.
He said the number two tail rotor drive shaft bearing is gone.
I said, What in the hell do you mean it’s gone. (worn out, spinning, what?)
He said, The damned thing is gone.

Now this can’t be.
The #2 bearing is at the aft engine firewall and not only supports the tail rotor shaft, it supports one side of the oil cooler squirrel cage fan.
No support the fan becomes a buzz saw.

The bearing had disintegrated. There was still some of the outer and inner race left but nothing supporting the drive shaft and front of the fan.

I told my passenger he must be living right because what usually happens, in a failure like this, is the spinning shaft and fan (7000 rpm) cuts off the tail and the helicopter goes in up side down.

scottMO
12-13-2003, 08:15
I've got 2, both while I was a JumpPilot flying Skydivers:

Once was when I was dropping a low load (students at 3000). We cant reach ATC until we are about 2000 feet off the deck so our initial contact w/them and our "1 min to drop" are almost back to back. I advised ATC 1 min to drop, and I'm cleared for jumprun w/ATC, and have a student climbing out of the plane when I hear one of our other planes call "jumpers away from 10,500". By now, my student is hanging from the wing and I fully expect to see bodies falling through/past me at any moment. I never saw them go by but there were 5 open chutes under me when I looked back. Speaking w/all the jumpers later, none ever saw me either.


The second was with a student climbing out for a IAD jump from 3500ft. This is where the instructor holds their pilot chute (the little parachute that pulls out the real parachute, for you non skydivers) in their hand while the student climbs out of the plane. In theory, when the student lets go, then the instructor lets go of the pilot chute and both clear the plane, and the parachute starts to open. This time, the instructor dropped the pilot chute w/the kid still firmly attatched to the wing strut(I didnt directly see the prev happen) but in less than a second, I heard a bang, felt a thump from the parachute hitting the tail and looked to see the parachute almost fully opened and facing up. The I have never seen a slider come down that fast as it ripped the kid off of the wing strut. We had no damage and this kid under the parachute lost no (ZERO) altitude.

Both of the above situations could have been very ugly.

scottMO

mbsigman
12-14-2003, 23:16
In 29 years of flying I've had all sorts of emergencies. All the usual rot - precautionary engine shutdowns, an engine explosion/fire, gear wouldn't extend, medical emergencies, lost com in icing conditions due to precipitation static, the usual stuff.

But the worst incident spooked me so bad I can still taste the adrenalin.

I was a student at Burnside Ott (anyone remember them) out of Opa Locka, Florida with my Private ASEL, working towards my Commercial. 1974. Was trying to impress this good looking lady who was in my English class. Wanna go for an airplane ride? Why sure!

So here's Joe AceoftheBase with all of 100 hours TT (and eighteen years old) rocketing skyward with said comely lady in our Cessklunk OneIftyTwice over the Everglades. I was at 1500' agl on a beautiful South Florida day. Came up over the Miami VOR and I was actively looking for traffic. I mean I really was looking for other airplanes as at that time MIA was a hotbed of student activity and there were typically airplanes all over the place.

I looked out my window. I looked straight ahead. Looked right out her window. Looked at her boobage. (OK, I freely admit it - I'm a pig.) Looked straight ahead again. Looked once again out my left window. Then looked down out my left window, and another 152 slid underneath us. Fifteen feet below us. Yeah, I said fifteen feet.

Although it scared the living piss out of me, I didn't react. In that regard, I did good. Took a deep breath and pressed on. After the flight we went out, had a good time, dropped her off.

Promptly called my father. He is a big time aviation enthusiast and always encouraged me in my career. By the time I picked up the phone I realized just how close we came, and I was SHOOK. He got me calmed down. Asked me how many close calls I'd had whilst driving, and that kind of put things into perspective.

South Florida was so busy that it got to the point that I wouldn't even consider it close unless I had to take the airplane from the student and make a violent maneuver to get out of the way.

But I will tell you that to this day I will NOT under any circumstances fly VFR at 1500' agl. I'll do 1400, 1300, 1700, anything but 1500!

Couple years later I was instructing for Burnside and we had two training flights hit due west of FLL. One flew through the other's cockpit. All four dead. Both instructors were top notch. On one instructor's nightstand was a book "How to avoid midair collisions."

Mike

Skyhook
12-15-2003, 04:19
Whew! That Big Sky Theory works for most of us most of the time, but I'm always looking for that 'golden B-B'.
"Blinded by the sun" is one factor in a mid-air that killed three neighbor's kids and one of my best instructors.
Beware that winter setting sun, friends.

F14Scott
12-19-2003, 19:46
Here's a good spinning story, and it wasn't even me. (It happened to one of my best friends and an awesome squadron pilot, who I'll call John and his RIO Jim.)

John and Jim were fighting some 2 v 2 intercepts against our sister squadron over the water while out at sea. The four planes came to the merge "tally 2 visual," meaning everybody saw everybody, and paired off into two 1 v 1s for some ACM fun/training. John took his bandit left to left at about 450KIAS, and watched as he cut nose-low, two-circle behind his tails. John, needing to get his knots down a bit so as not to arc, stayed on the horizon, turning left at 6.5 gs to bleed down to corner. But, the bandit, going out-of-plane fast, was disappearing underneath John. So, forgetting the NATOPS restriction against doing so, John stepped on his bottom rudder to slice his nose down to keep sight.

And off to the races he went, into an immediate coupled departure that progressed within about five seconds into a fully developed flat spin. John, about 5'8" and in very good shape, was immediately pinned forward against the "dashboard." His face happened to land on the turn needle, and he could see sky in his periferial vision, so he pushed the stick forward and into the needle and stepped on the opposite rudder. His RIO, closer to the spinning jet's center of mass, was able to hold himself back far enough to see the altimeter, which was winding down quickly. They had started the fight at about 18,000, and were rapidly approaching 10,000, where NATOPS says one must eject while spinning flat.

The jet was moving into thicker air, and the flight controls John held were beginning to bite, slowing the spin. Jim called over the ICS to John that they were passing 11K, were slowing, and to hold what he had. Then the motors both snuffed, taking the electric ICS with them. They passed 10K. Still spinning, unable to talk to each other or hear the other jets calling them on the radios, and unable to see the altimeter, John held the controls, trusting that Jim could still see the altimeter and would punch them out if they got "too" low.

Finally, the nose dropped and John neutralized the controls and then pulled to the horizon. He scooped out at 3800' and 350 KIAS. Except that both his motors were still off. He air started one and then the other.

Back on deck, John and Jim faced a bittersweet welcome. Heros for recovering the only know fully developed Tomcat flat spin, they were goats for entering it in the first place. Also heros for saving the jet, they were likewise goats for disregarding NATOPS and staying with the jet.

Overall, they came out of it none the worse for wear, net neutral in the eyes of the command, and with a great sea story to tell at the club.

W. Bell
12-24-2003, 21:49
At least one a day, when the alarm clock goes off.