Heliocopter Emergency Landing Video. [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Wulfenite
02-20-2004, 16:00
http://www.klas-tv.com/Global/story.asp?S=1655384&nav=168XKxMw

Curious what's going on here. Never heard of this procedure.

mhambi
02-20-2004, 16:28
I guess that's why they're called skids...




I'd be interested to hear the rundown from some of our rotorheads.

Texas T
02-20-2004, 17:16
Can't wait for M2 to chime in on this. Wow, I'm amazed as how far he slid down the runway before coming to a stop.

Tour company refunded the price and took them to dinner too. Wonder if they also picked up the dry cleaning bill? ;P ;f

M2 Carbine
02-20-2004, 18:49
Cool, he did a good job.

Tail rotor problems are one of the most difficult emergencies to handle.

What you do depends on what's wrong and where and what flight condition and how wrong.

For a tail rotor failure at a hover, you roll the throttle off and cushion the touchdown with the mainrotor pitch.

If the tail rotor drive fails in flight (the rotor isn't turning) you can continue flying to a good area or airport and shoot an autorotation.
As long as you keep the air speed high the vertical fin will keep you pretty straight.
When you roll off the throttle, to enter an autorotation, there is no more torque so the tail rotor isn't as important as it is with power and torque.

A PHI Bolkow pilot was killed (damned I say that a lot:( )
when he tried to make an approach with the tail rotor out.
Why he tried a powered approach instead of shooting an autorotation no one knows.
At about 50 feet the airspeed reduced to the point that the torque spun the chopper and the pilot lost it. A main rotor blade hit the pilot. I think the passengers got out alive.

If the problem is a stuck pedal (tail rotor pitch) what you do depends on where it's stuck.
Stuck right or left pedal or somewhere in between, in cruise flight,
it takes a combination of engine power/torque/RPM and collective (main rotor) pitch to get it down.

It looked like that pilot's pedals were stuck about cruise (centered) setting. That's why he was coming in so fast, so the vertical fin would help keep him straight.

We had to do stuck pedal failure on the annual check rides.
Fun but weird. :)

Anyhow that guy did good.

Wulfenite
02-20-2004, 20:38
So if it sticks in cruise setting you'll rotate one way if you lower the power and the other if you increase power? This guys solution was to fly the thing onto the runway in a cruise configuration and not reduce the power till he had some weight on the skids to reduce the turning tendancy. Did I get it right?

Why would you use this technique rather than the autorotation? Night perhaps?

M2 Carbine
02-20-2004, 22:21
Originally posted by Wulfenite
So if it sticks in cruise setting you'll rotate one way if you lower the power and the other if you increase power? This guys solution was to fly the thing onto the runway in a cruise configuration and not reduce the power till he had some weight on the skids to reduce the turning tendancy. Did I get it right?

Why would you use this technique rather than the autorotation? Night perhaps?

That's it exactly, power changes mean torque changes and the chopper will yaw like you said.

The more power he reduced the more the chopper would yaw.
Compounded by a loss of streamlining effect of his vertical fin due to the reducing airspeed.

So he wanted to get it as slow as he could without it yawing too bad on touchdown and flipping over.

The last thing he was doing was using the collective and throttle/torque to keep it straight and get the power off as fast as he could.

Why not an autorotation?
When you enter an autorotation you have rolled the throttle back to idle, so now there's no torque.
The body is streamlined pretty good with that vertical tail and you have slowed down to about 60/70 knots

Normally you would change your pedal settings a couple inches to adjust for the lack of torque but in this case the pedals are stuck and the aircraft is yawing and building up a high sink rate.

It would be something worse than trying to land an airplane with the rudder locked pretty far off center.

I never had a real stuck pedal:)

FlyNavy
03-07-2004, 05:12
I found a frayed tailrotor cable on preflight about a month ago here in Bahrain. Pretty spooky stuff.

Texas T
03-07-2004, 21:31
Originally posted by FlyNavy
I found a frayed tailrotor cable on preflight about a month ago here in Bahrain. Pretty spooky stuff. Better that you found it and not the accident investigators. :)

I read some of your other posts; it sounds like you're having a hell of a good time serving Uncle Sam. Thanks! This one's for you...

;Y

FlyNavy
03-08-2004, 04:04
Thanks Texas! There are thousands of guys out here in the Persian Gulf area busting their butts for the cause. Unfortunately not all of them have fun jobs. The kids loading the bombs on jets and turning wrenches are the true unsung heros. I join you in toasting them!

Pave Pilot
03-10-2004, 04:41
I used to like doing slides in a Huey ;g ...there were several EPs when that was the best solution. In flight school we had steel pads under the skids....lots of great sparks looking through NVGs...

FlyNavy
03-10-2004, 06:38
I always thought run-ons with metal skids felt unnatural but I'm glad they make you train em. Beats pulling power you either don't have or are afraid to use!

Wulfenite
03-12-2004, 22:04
The NTSB report for this incident is up.

http://ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20040224X00233&key=1

NTSB Identification: LAX04IA133
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Incident occurred Thursday, February 19, 2004 in Las Vegas, NV
Aircraft: Eurocopter AS 350B, registration: N358NT
Injuries: 7 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On February 19, 2004, at 1759 Pacific standard time, an Eurocopter AS 350B, N358NT, experienced an in-flight loss of tail rotor control about 15 miles from Las Vegas International Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada. Heli USA, Inc., was operating the helicopter under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 135. The commercial pilot and five passengers were not injured; the helicopter sustained minor damage. The flight departed the Grand Canyon Airport, Grand Canyon, Arizona, at 1715, for the on-demand air tour flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a company flight plan was in effect.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector reported that the tail rotor bellcrank assembly failed, resulting in a loss of tail rotor control. The part will be submitted for metallurgical examination.

According to the manufacturer, the total time on the helicopter was 9,915.6 hours. The tail rotor gearbox assembly had 3,148.5 hours. The bellcrank is an on-condition part, which calls for inspection during the overhaul. The overhauls are completed at a normal interval of 3,000 hours; the manufacturer allows a tolerance of 10 percent over the recommended overhaul schedule.