I Got A Slot!!!!!!!!!! [Archive] - Glock Talk

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max-static
04-07-2004, 23:22
So I mostly just lurk on this forum but thought I should let you folks know that tonight I was awarded my categorization wings through Air Force R.O.T.C. This means that in one year, after I graduate college, I will be attending Joint Specialized Undergraduate Pilot Training to learn to fly jets for Uncle Sam. Competition was brutal this year with a selection rate of about 50%(513 slots for about 1200 applications) but I did what had to be done and almost 2 years later I have my slot. I know that this was the easy part as flight training is like drinking from a fire hose but I'm still excited. This is my dream. Thought some of you folks would like to know and share in a little celebration with me. Also if there is anyone out there considering military aviation, I would be more than happy to answer questions about how to get in. 'Night and stay safe all.

Max

Wulfenite
04-07-2004, 23:35
Congratulations!

That's quite an accomplishment.

I just got back from a talk where there were several military aviators in attendance. To a man they have all lead interesting lives and continue to do great things. You're on a fortuitous path.

Texas T
04-08-2004, 01:11
Cool beans for you!!!

;?

ScubaSven
04-08-2004, 01:31
Good job!




Good luck!

dozing4dollars
04-08-2004, 19:38
Congratulations max-static !!:)


Although it was quite a few years ago, I remember the day that I got selected for UPT. At that time, with only weeks to go to my college graduation, only 10-20% of my AFROTC graduating class nationwide would be selected to attend UPT, following the Vietnam draw down of the mid-seventies.

SUPT will be a tremendously challenging time for you! You will be challenged and expected to perform at the highest performance levels you are capable of. With tremendous effort, dedication and a little luck, you will complete SUPT and hopefully get the aircraft assignment you dream of.

In my four years in the SUPT environment (UPT and FAIP tour), I only had a handful of students who could not hack the program for varying reasons. Unfortunately, the USAF SUPT training syllabus only allows a certain number of training sorties to master the required skills before you are eliminated.

Get to SUPT and become a sponge-try to absorb everything you see and hear from your IP's. You will find college was probably a cakewalk compared to the academic, physical and flying requirements that will be expected of you in this extremely competitive environment.

Above all, keep a positive attitude, give 150 percent and have FUN! Your year in SUPT will FLY by. Following graduation, you will be in an elite fraternity- a military aviator.

I wish you the best in your new adventure! You have every right to be very proud of your success to date and the expectation that your future will be filled with amazing experiences.

;?

max-static
04-08-2004, 19:48
Thank you all for the kind words.

04-08-2004, 20:30
Here's to you!;Y

BUT...you have to promise that you will never, ever, wear one of those goofy looking ascots.

max-static
04-08-2004, 21:38
Originally posted by HeyMoe
you have to promise that you will never, ever, wear one of those goofy looking ascots.


DONE!!!!!! You won't see me in a "Cosby sweat'a" either. I have been wearing my flight suit around the house all day today though....ok I slept in it too. ;) Hey it's a child hood dream thing.

Max

BillCola
04-08-2004, 23:08
Max, that is out-of-this-world!!!! Congratulations to you.

M2 Carbine
04-08-2004, 23:25
Congratulations Max.

It's a lot of work but it sure is a lot of fun.:)

Pave Pilot
04-11-2004, 10:20
;? congratulations ! ^c

Now you can put off having to "grow up and get a job" like I have....;Q ;f ;+ ;f :cool:

WstSidHomE
04-27-2004, 20:57
I have a question. I'm 20, in college, but have been holding myself back from getting my private pilots license. The reason for this is because I had planned on joining up after college and going to OTS, to hopefully get a free ride on Uncle Sam's tab, like you. Would it help my chances at getting a slot at all if I already had flight time/license? One last question, are there any height limitations? I'm 6'4'' or so, pertaining to all branches. Thanks a lot!

Matt :cool:

max-static
04-27-2004, 21:20
There is no flight time that is required. I must warn you though, going through OTS for a slot is pretty darn competitive. For instance, the Air Force wanted 1,158 pilot candidates for the 2005 graduation year. 524 of those came from the Academy, 513 came from ROTC, and 121 came from OTS. Keep in mind that this is more slots than OTS has ever gotten to my belief. The target total, for all AFSCs(all the jobs there is) is 4,414 for 2005. 914 come from Academy, 2,500 come from ROTC, and 1,000 from OTS. So you can see that the rate of selection is much higher in ROTC. IMHO it is a much better program too as you get several years of leadership, in a college environment (unlike the "4 years of boot camp" environment of the Academy) than the very short OTS training cycle. Now with that said, I logged 12 flying hours and retook the AFOQT to make myself more competitive. I'm glad I did as with my previous PSCM score I probably would not have gotten a slot. I strongly urge you to look into ROTC, if your school does not have a Detachment, look into if there is a cross-town sponsor for your school. If not, you may want to transfer. I know this sounds like a lot, but a lot is what it takes. I was going to school about 1000 miles from where I go to school now. I moved/transfered for the ROTC program. Glad I did. There are height limitations, and I can't remember them off the top of my head. Search www.afrotc.com, I'm sure it's on there somewhere. I think you are right on the line, limit might be about 6'5" or 6'7" or something. Don't worry, there is a waiver for everything. Hope I answered your questions. If you have more, fire away. Always glad to help. I have names and numbers of people you can call if you find yourself interested in ROTC. What ever you do, whoever you talk to, you are NOT interested in enlisting!!!!!! What you are looking for is an Officer's Commission! Normal requiters typically are not set up to talk to you about this kind of thing so you may have to do some looking. Let me know if you want contact info. Best of luck.

04-27-2004, 22:01
Originally posted by WstSidHomE
Would it help my chances at getting a slot at all if I already had flight time/license?

Times change, and so do requirements, but having a private pilot's license was a big deal to the Air Force, when I applied for OCS in 1982. It was considered a big plus. The Navy and Marine Corps did not seem to care either way. I did not have a private pilot's license at the time. The Air Force turned me down, but the Navy took me in so fast, that I was in Pensacola, getting my head shaved before I knew what happened. ;f

Having a private license will never hurt, so if you can afford it, I would go for it. The recruiter can tell you about any other requirements. Start asking them questions now, but do like max-static said, and be sure you are talking to someone about the Officer Commission program.

Good luck.


Edit: Don't know about the Air Force, but there are some height limitations in the Navy/Marine Corps. Much of it has to do with fitting properly in the ejection seat. An improper fit could kill you during an ejection. One guy in my primary flight class was only allowed to fly helicopters, because he was so tall.

Texas T
04-27-2004, 22:04
Originally posted by max-static
There are height limitations, and I can't remember them off the top of my head. Search www.afrotc.com, I'm sure it's on there somewhere. I think you are right on the line, limit might be about 6'5" or 6'7" or something. Don't worry, there is a waiver for everything. The son of a friend was going to Annapolis with the hopes of going Marine Air and flying the Hornet but due to his height it was unknown whether or not he would ever get into the program. The word we got is that it's not the overall height, but rather the length of the upper leg when sitting down.

Apparently when you have to eject they prefer that your entire body clear the cockpit frame and not just your torso. ;f

04-27-2004, 22:22
Originally posted by Texas T
The word we got is that it's not the overall height, but rather the length of the upper leg when sitting down.

Yep, that's true. Having long thigh bones will result in two broken legs during an ejection (when the seat hits you in the a** on the way out of the plane).

But don't get too discouraged. A very good friend of mine is at least 6'5", and he flew RF-4s in Vietnam. He also flew KC-135's later in his career, before he retired. You just have to go get the physical, and get measured. The recruiter can tell you all about it.

WstSidHomE
04-28-2004, 13:55
Originally posted by max-static
There is no flight time that is required. I must warn you though, going through OTS for a slot is pretty darn competitive. For instance, the Air Force wanted 1,158 pilot candidates for the 2005 graduation year. 524 of those came from the Academy, 513 came from ROTC, and 121 came from OTS. Keep in mind that this is more slots than OTS has ever gotten to my belief. The target total, for all AFSCs(all the jobs there is) is 4,414 for 2005. 914 come from Academy, 2,500 come from ROTC, and 1,000 from OTS. So you can see that the rate of selection is much higher in ROTC. IMHO it is a much better program too as you get several years of leadership, in a college environment (unlike the "4 years of boot camp" environment of the Academy) than the very short OTS training cycle. Now with that said, I logged 12 flying hours and retook the AFOQT to make myself more competitive. I'm glad I did as with my previous PSCM score I probably would not have gotten a slot. I strongly urge you to look into ROTC, if your school does not have a Detachment, look into if there is a cross-town sponsor for your school. If not, you may want to transfer. I know this sounds like a lot, but a lot is what it takes. I was going to school about 1000 miles from where I go to school now. I moved/transfered for the ROTC program. Glad I did. There are height limitations, and I can't remember them off the top of my head. Search www.afrotc.com, I'm sure it's on there somewhere. I think you are right on the line, limit might be about 6'5" or 6'7" or something. Don't worry, there is a waiver for everything. Hope I answered your questions. If you have more, fire away. Always glad to help. I have names and numbers of people you can call if you find yourself interested in ROTC. What ever you do, whoever you talk to, you are NOT interested in enlisting!!!!!! What you are looking for is an Officer's Commission! Normal requiters typically are not set up to talk to you about this kind of thing so you may have to do some looking. Let me know if you want contact info. Best of luck.

WOW! Thanks a ton! I would have *never* knew that OTS was so competitive compared to Academy/ROTC. ROTC is probably the way for me, since I cannot see how I would ever make it into the Academy. I learned the "enlisting" lesson a long time ago, when every branch came knocking on my door a few hours later. I sure would like the contact information you have! Thanks a bunch guys!

Matt;f

max-static
04-28-2004, 14:52
you have mail...

SlimlineGlock
04-28-2004, 19:30
Max,

Congratulations! Go to training with an attitude that flying is fun and you are the kid in the candy store. In my 5 years of teaching T-38s I saw only the ones who were stressed out with all the pressure fail. If you have a bad day, don't dwell on it; just focus on correcting the problem and press on.

I went on to fly fighters and now airliners. I still think flying is fun!

M2 Carbine
04-28-2004, 20:39
WstSidHomE,

In reference to having a pilot's license before flight school.

As a student in Army pilot training it helped me out greatly.

While the other students were trying to learn weather, navigation and aerodynamics I could devote the time towards other subjects and still max the flight subjects.

There's never enough time for all you have to learn and do.


Later when I was instructing, if a student had prior flight experience I could talk to him on a higher level and not spend time going into long winded explainations about something he already knew.
Again saving both flight and ground time that we could use to further his knowledge and skill.:)

max-static
04-28-2004, 20:54
Don't know if this is the way the Army does it or not but before you go to UPT(undergrad pilot training), you attend IFT(intro flight training). Basically Uncle Sam pays for you to get your private's at a civilian aviation place. Sometimes you do this on your casual status, sometimes you are an AdLt at your Det. etc. So when you go to UPT, you will have your private with instrument rating(think this was included). Then you have to re-learn everything anyway as the Military does things different. Don't get me wrong, flight time is good time, but it's not mandatory. Do what you can afford. I did 12 hours and it cost me about $1300. Hope this helps.

max-static
05-25-2007, 20:29
Well folks, some of you may remember this post, some may not. I just received my military aviation wings tonight and have two small punctures in my chest to prove it. It has taken more than just a few years, a fair share of sacrifice, and a whole lot of hard work but I am here now. Just thought everyone would dig the update. Moral of the story is once you set yourself in motion, the only thing that can stop you is you. Don't every stop, don't ever quit, follow your dreams and enjoy your life!

:supergrin:

SlimlineGlock
05-27-2007, 06:02
Congrats! A long road well done.

What A/C will you be trained on now?

max-static
05-27-2007, 09:31
So far my training a/c have been as follows:
C-150, C-172 (IFS i.e. getting the private pilot's license) 50hrs
T-6 (JSUPT) 100hrs
TH-1H (SUPT-H) 110hrs
UH-1N is my primary a/c for now and I go TDY to get upgraded in a few weeks.

Took the FAA mil comp exam the other day and snagged my commercial, instrument, centerline thrust jet, and helicopter out of it. Also get the high perf endorsement so says the word around the camp fire.

jacquejet
05-27-2007, 11:34
Few things match the "cool" of walking around your pilot training base as a 2Lt with your new wings on.

Try to find a book called "Unknown Rider" by Scott Anderson. You will probably only be able to find it used. The chapter on UPT could only have been written by someone that has been there.

max-static
05-27-2007, 21:03
Originally posted by jacquejet
Few things match the "cool" of walking around your pilot training base as a 2Lt with your new wings on.



That's the other cool thing. I promote to 1Lt in 3 week. ;)

Thanks for the book recommendation, will look it up.

vote Republican
05-28-2007, 11:57
Congrats, max!!! Blast from the past :cool:

Norman
05-28-2007, 12:04
That has to be an absolutely incredible feeling, after so many years of hard work.


Congrats, and a job well done, Max. You deserve it. Do us all proud!

:patriot:

k9medic
05-28-2007, 17:38
Now you need to update your profile! Congratulations!!!

geoffinak
06-14-2007, 08:47
Congratulations, that lasts for a day, now on to training.
First everyone who has posted to help here, take their advice and connections, learn everything you can, from everyone you can meet, email phone or see in person. You need to understand what is coming at you fully.

Get your private Ticket and study and take the written for the commercial, Instrument, Flight instructor and ATP. Also Aircraft Dispatcher Take the written tests at home over and over until you can get 98% on all of them. Most have computer courses where the questions can be changed. Try to get the military written tests. If this is legal. Because a lot of the regs are different. Also get a Jet Manual a Citation to make things simple, then the aircraft that you would be first training in and start learning it

Get a good acrobatics instructor, and do a lot of of acrobatic training until you do not get sick, you will be surprised on a hot day under pressure just how fast you can get air sick. doing spins and loops. Your acrobatic instructor may be different then your regular flight instructor. Make sure , she or he is very qualified and has a acrobatic airplane that will take some serious stress, because you want to go to the edge of it's performance and be comfortable with it. Make sure you wear a parachute, I don't care what they say, if that plane is used in acrobatics, it could have been tweaked.
I would do the acrobatics till it feel natural to fly upside down in a side slip in 100 degree heat. You need a REALLY good instructor in a plane that will really snap and roll at the slightest touch. Plus take a high amount of Gs. You can start in a 152 acrobatic but you need to quickly get into the real stuff. Don't worry if you become the vomit comet for a while. You will train it out

You probably grew up on Video Games, so the Sims will be easy, but what I and others have seen is the eye hand coordination is there on the initial sim tests, but get them in the air and there way behind the airplane. So really work on your situational awareness in your training. Fly at least 3 times a week, any less and you spend about 40% of the lesson learning what you were taught 4 days ago. It's more money, but you learn faster. Train to commercial and ATP standards, not Private Pilot, tell your instructor what you want to do and accomplish out of the training. Fly approaches and fly them under the hood. Do acrobatics under the hood.

Take the Cessna syllabus and throw it out the window, your training to fly the best of the best. So set your standards at what they will expect ATP levels and train to that level now, who cares what your instructor wants, if he says we must go by the book, get a new one. If you have to pay 15 to 20 bucks an hour more to get a well seasoned instructor or a very good pilot instructor, take that route rather then a 500 hour Instructor.

Find out the books the Academy uses and start reading them now. As someone else posted he was a pilot and way ahead of his classmates in WX, Navigation, Regulations, both Military and Federal air regulations. You want to be ahead, because something will pop up that will be hard, so you can easily put time in because you already know the FARs and flying to a 98% pass rate. by heart.

Don't waste a second, you can take a break and look out and go this is cool, but then it's back to training, back to making it. You have to put out 300% because everyone else will be doing 150% to 200%

Believe in yourself, that if you do everything you can, to the best of your ability, you will be chosen, do not let a inch of doubt sneak in there. See the goal and get it. Never take your eye off the prize, even if some one is trying to break you by being in your face, telling you that you will not make it.

Your going to be flying some of the most complicated, most sophisticated aircraft in the world, no matter what you fly. You have no room for error, you must make some time to relax a bit but not much. Keep yourself balanced but VERY few people get a shot at this and I would like to see you get it.

Give yourself every head start you can. If there is a subject area that your weak on. Math, science, physics, weather, aerodynamics, which the military loves, all will play a role in this training, get some brush up on them, tutoring or online courses. You must be prepared. Don't show up thinking their going to teach you, they do, but you have to move along the modules and all it takes is one mistake to pull the ejection seat. Plus being prepared will help get around any personality conflicts. You know, some people just may not like you, for no reason other then the wife is being nasty to him. Don't leave room for anyone to worm into your circle. Preparations will get you around many things. Keep it low key, let your performance make your statement

Find out the whole curriculum, the whole study program. Be totally prepared because when you show up, then you will really start to work hard and learn.

If your prepared for this before you go, you will make it.

Just my advice.
Good luck and keep us posted, remember there will be tough periods, do not be afraid to reach out and say this is hard to your friends, never let the instructors see you sweat. Go fly your tail off now and read and read and fly.

Remember if you do all the right things you will not fail, you just picture yourself where you want to be and do the things you have to and YOU will make it.

Today is the first day of training.
Good luck and be safe and I just feel that you will make it.
Geoff

Texas T
06-17-2007, 19:52
Congrats Max! Glad to hear things are looking "up" for you.

max-static
06-24-2007, 07:39
Originally posted by geoffinak


If your prepared for this before you go, you will make it.


Geoff

I should clarify. I got my Military wings as in all done with SUPT. Great advice though as that's pretty much what I did.

First post was in 2004, then I commissioned, got private pilot's license, went to JSUPT and flew T-6, wanted helos more than anything and got them, came to Rucker for Huey's, finished up, now heading to fly N model Hueys for a tour. Got back from SERE last night, promoted to 1Lt yesterday morning, so life is good now. Life is REAL good. Thanks all!

Max

Norman
06-24-2007, 08:50
Originally posted by max-static
I should clarify. I got my Military wings as in all done with SUPT. Great advice though as that's pretty much what I did.

First post was in 2004, then I commissioned, got private pilot's license, went to JSUPT and flew T-6, wanted helos more than anything and got them, came to Rucker for Huey's, finished up, now heading to fly N model Hueys for a tour. Got back from SERE last night, promoted to 1Lt yesterday morning, so life is good now. Life is REAL good. Thanks all!

Max

You're living the dream, man! Enjoy it and be safe! :patriot:

geoffinak
07-01-2007, 04:45
Originally posted by max-static
I should clarify. I got my Military wings as in all done with SUPT. Great advice though as that's pretty much what I did.
First post was in 2004, then I commissioned, Thanks all!
Max

Missed the check list on that one, for some reason it popped up as a new post on my mail. Oh well, your doing what you love and if I had a choice, I would pick Heleos, but you got your fixed wing too, that is excellent, when you retire, you can do both. I have only got to fly a CH 47 sim at NAS North Island. The guy who serviced the sims at night gave me a tour. Never crashed and landed on the ship a few times. Made me really hanker to take lessons, but the time to get insurance was just impossible and at that time in my life, I could nor live on instructors pay. But helos would have ben for me. I love the control imputs. The feel of really doing something with a million parts all try to fly apart. Airplane get her power set and trimmed and they fly themselves. I made enough close calls to know it's a full time excersisie , which I love. Enjoy life and glad all the dreams you had came true. You proved work hard do a good job and you can do whatever you want.
Congradulations. Stay safe

Geoff

Andrew Tacquard
07-01-2007, 16:53
Originally posted by geoffinak
Airplane get her power set and trimmed and they fly themselves.

Geoff

Not trying to start a fix vs. rotary fight, but both fixed and rotary require someone to fly them. Sure there are automatic flight controls, auto throttle, auto trim, etc., but there is still a need for a pilot.

Oh and congrads on your wings.

geoffinak
07-05-2007, 15:31
Originally posted by Andrew Tacquard
Not trying to start a fix vs. rotary fight, but both fixed and rotary require someone to fly them. Sure there are automatic flight controls, auto throttle, auto trim, etc., but there is still a need for a pilot.

Oh and congrads on your wings.

I am not trying to start one, each is a very demanding set of forces set in motion and if not attended to correctly and "smartly" you will be picking corn cobs from places you did not think existed. They each have there go/no go points of flight safety and ultimately it comes down to the pilot.

However, if someone asked me what takes more attention and inputs to fly, I would have to say the helo. A airplane is made to fly, the helo we can A.R. but that's just me.
Geoff

max-static
07-06-2007, 07:37
Also not wanting to start anything. I've flown, and love, them both but....here is a little quote that always brings sunshine to my face.

"The thing is, helicopters are different from planes. An airplane by it's nature wants to fly, and if not interfered with too strongly by unusual events or by a deliberately incompetent pilot, it will fly. A helicopter does not want to fly. It is maintained in the air by a variety of forces and controls working in opposition to each other, and if there is any disturbance in this delicate balance the helicopter stops flying; immediately and disastrously. There is no such thing as a gliding helicopter.
This is why being a helicopter pilot is so different from being an airplane pilot, and why in generality, airplane pilots are open, clear-eyed, buoyant extroverts and helicopter pilots are brooding introspective anticipators of trouble. They know if something bad has not happened it is about to."

Harry Reasoner, February 16, 1971

:thumbsup:

Andrew Tacquard
07-08-2007, 17:05
Helos do beat the wind into submission and there has to be alot of things going right in order for it to fly. The 1st a/c I flew was the t-34, which was meant to fly and had a decent glide ratio. Then the T45, which wasn't originally designed as a carrier jet. But it wasn't to hard to fly and would glide a little bit. Then the harrier, which shouldn't be able to fly, and glides about like a brick. Extra controls, and the whole jet borne thing. My experience with flying is very limited. I wasn't thinking about the rest of fixed wing aircraft. There is a difference in military fixed wing, and the rest of fixed wing aviation.

max-static
07-08-2007, 17:49
Originally posted by Andrew Tacquard
. There is a difference in military fixed wing, and the rest of fixed wing aviation.

VERY true! ;)

Juliet Lima
07-15-2007, 00:26
Originally posted by max-static


First post was in 2004, then I commissioned, got private pilot's license, went to JSUPT and flew T-6, wanted helos more than anything and got them, came to Rucker for Huey's, finished up, now heading to fly N model Hueys for a tour. Got back from SERE last night, promoted to 1Lt yesterday morning, so life is good now. Life is REAL good. Thanks all!

Max

Congrats brother! At least your not a butter bar anymore. If your ever flying on the west coast maybe I'll talk to you on the radios.

heliguy
07-31-2007, 19:44
Congratulations!!! But you are going to miss out on all the fun of flying Rotorwing!!! Hope you get to save our ass in Iraq!

WINGS
08-26-2007, 09:03
S*** hot, Max. Congratulations.

Blue side up........................

W

clipper100
09-15-2007, 17:31
See the old movie: 'Officer and a Gentleman'

So you don't fall for every 'chickee' who would love to be a pilot's wife.

Trust me.... They will be waiting for you.