Gun dogs--what breed do you have??? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Dogbite
04-20-2004, 21:19
I have been thinking about an all purpose gun dog and wondering what you guys might have--looking at bird dog/retriever with maybe a little watchdog attitude for around the house.Some breeds i have been researching are--german wirehaired pointer,chesapeke bay retriever,wirehaired pointing griffen.What do you have and does it do everything,or most things well???Thanks for all the replies.

repete34
04-20-2004, 22:16
Labs

JDP
04-20-2004, 22:21
If you want a single dog for all kinds of hunting you should go for a Lab. They generally don't do as well for upland hunting as some breeds like Springers but if you get one that is bred for upland they'll do just fine. Most upland breeds can't take the cold of duck hunting and most retrievers are too big and slow for upland. Look for one that's on the smaller side and get the best breeding you can afford. My current hunting dog is a Golden/Lab mix. She's super fast(and can keep it up for a long time) and has a great nose which are really the two things you need most. I hope this helps!

Esox357
04-21-2004, 06:14
Personal choice like anything, I prefer German Shorthair Pointers. Esox357

PlasticGuy
04-21-2004, 09:19
Originally posted by Dogbite
I have been thinking about an all purpose gun dog and wondering what you guys might have--looking at bird dog/retriever with maybe a little watchdog attitude for around the house...
You just described my lab, Sadie. She has great instincts and required minimal training. She will go through brush and water to get birds for me without a second thought. She requires no special grooming or care. She is very friendly around people she knows, and while she has never bitten anyone she always alerts me to activity around the house (like the turd who tried to steal my truck a couple of months ago). Other breeds may be more exciting, but I don't think any are better for an all-around hunter/pet.

Toml
04-21-2004, 09:43
My Llewellin Setter, Bob, (English setter out of a field dog line) was great on quail and grouse. He hunted at whatever pace I set, whether on foot or bicycle. Never liked to fetch. (Some do, some don't.) Easy dog to get along with...he didn't run off (after the lesson about chasing deer early on), was a faithful companion and a good watchdog until his death in March last year. If you looked where he pointed you would find wildlife. (He liked to stalk everything that moved, but was most intense on birds.)

Like with all highly-bred field dogs, you need to be careful about structural problems in the setter lines.

I like labs but they're not in the same category as griffons, setters, and pointers. I'd like to have one of those, but would get another English setter based on my experience.

NAVHDA (www.navhda.org) has lots of information about versatile hunting dogs.

minnshooter
04-22-2004, 09:58
I have a black lab and a German Shorthair Pointer. I would never get another GSP- I am going lab all the way. Just my humble opinion.

D25
04-22-2004, 10:26
<--- Lab!

TJC
04-22-2004, 20:15
Drahthaars

TJC
04-22-2004, 20:16
Reba, the baby. Going to be 2 years old next month.

TJC
04-22-2004, 20:19
Last one, promise.

MrMunster
04-26-2004, 10:58
I've got 2 labs and use them exclusively on upland game.

One is a flusher (brush buster) by nature, the other actually points.

Researcher
04-26-2004, 12:14
I've got a black lab but I wouldn't count on her for being much of a watchdog, that would involve getting off the couch. ;f Great all around dog though.

fungunnin
05-04-2004, 18:23
German Short Hair Pointer. Hell of a good dog. Regardless of where he was he wanted to hunt. He loved the water and I saw him swim over a mile after a boat in November in the ocean of BC Canada.Huge heart and a great family dog. Super gental and very obidient. He did need to run daily... tons of energy.

40 glock
05-06-2004, 16:41
Britney

DJS4GLCK
05-06-2004, 17:20
My English Setter is a fine birddog. 12 years old now so she's retired but has been loyal and good natured all these years. Any of the pooches the readers have spoken of would be great, but I'll vote for Setters anyday.

Dogbite
05-06-2004, 21:11
Thanks for all the info--alot of good ideas.

El Capitan
05-08-2004, 09:51
Originally posted by D25
<--- Lab!
<--- Lab! ;f

Craigster
05-08-2004, 10:17
Brittany X 2

Craigster
05-08-2004, 10:26
Gage is backing his mom who is on point under the brush in the bottom of the ditch

AK_Stick
05-09-2004, 03:47
PBGV

rfb45colt
05-11-2004, 10:04
The very best upland bird dogs I've ever hunted with are English Setters. Over the past 30 years, my dad and I owned 8 Setters (4 males & 4 females). My last Setter died at the age of 17, two years ago (she would've been 19 tomorrow). She hunted until she was 15, and when I "retired" her because she was stone deaf, I got my first Lab... a chocolate female. I went with a Lab, instead of another Setter, because I now do more duck hunting than upland hunting. As much as I love Setters, they are not a good choice for a duck hunting dog. My Lab does very good at grouse hunting too... but she really shines as a waterfowl retriever. My Setters were good retrievers of downed upland birds, but if a pheasant or grouse landed in the water, they were very hesitant at jumping in to fetch it. With either breed, if you knocked a bird out of the air, it was yours. They never failed to find it.

The Setters did require more training than my Lab. They were all natural pointers, but liked to "wander" out of gun range. It wasn't too much of a problem when hunting quail or pheasants... but grouse don't hold for a point nearly as long. My Lab just naturally stays in closer in heavy cover. It took a while for ME to get used to the fact that she just flushes the birds... after 30 yrs of hunting over good pointing dogs, it was quite an adjustment to make. ;)

Both breeds are excellant house dogs. The only downside to the Setters being in the house is the long white hairs that seem to get on everything. When I had 3 female Setters living in the house at the same time, everything I wore looked like a white fur coat. :)

As for intelligence, the Lab is a much smarter dog. It's not that Setters are dumb... all the ones we owned were very smart. But the Lab I have now just blows them away for intelligence. It might not be fair to make this statement, as I've only owned the one Lab, and maybe she's just exceptional. She's the only dog I've ever had that was 100% housebroken before she was 7 weeks old.

Both breeds are good with kids. But the Setters seemed to just "tolerate" kids that they don't live with, while my Lab actually seems to really enjoy their company. When my grand-daughters were learning to walk, my Lab would stand by each one and allow her to climb up on and hold on to her collar. My Lab would then walk very slowly, making sure she did nothing to make the kid fall. They'd walk around the house together, one step at a time. My daughter tells everyone that my dog taught her kids to walk... and she's not too far from the truth.

El Capitan
05-11-2004, 21:21
Originally posted by rfb45colt
As for intelligence, the Lab is a much smarter dog. It's not that Setters are dumb... all the ones we owned were very smart. But the Lab I have now just blows them away for intelligence. It might not be fair to make this statement, as I've only owned the one Lab, and maybe she's just exceptional. She's the only dog I've ever had that was 100% housebroken before she was 7 weeks old.

Both breeds are good with kids. But the Setters seemed to just "tolerate" kids that they don't live with, while my Lab actually seems to really enjoy their company. When my grand-daughters were learning to walk, my Lab would stand by each one and allow her to climb up on and hold on to her collar. My Lab would then walk very slowly, making sure she did nothing to make the kid fall. They'd walk around the house together, one step at a time. My daughter tells everyone that my dog taught her kids to walk... and she's not too far from the truth.

I have a yellow 3 yr old and now a black 5 month old puppy lab too, and they are definitely as awesome as you describe.
They are extremely gentle with my 11 month old daughter, and are loved by her more than she does me. ;)
I'd love for them to be hunting dogs, but we just don't live close to any duck areas. But, they do LOVE to swim, any chance they get in the ocean or pools.

summitx
05-16-2004, 11:36
I have a 4 year old yellow lab, he works pretty well up here in AK for duck hunting, wish I could bring him to SD for some pheasant hunting.

CanyonMan
05-19-2004, 14:30
We have been thinking about getting a "RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK."

I have put a lot of research into this dog, and have some contacts to get a pup.

BUT... I have a question for anyone out there who has owned one, or knows someone who does..."And hunts with it." How good a hunting dog are they? How is their temperment? Have they had any medical problems with the dog? (i know what problems they 'can have', just want to see if anyone has had them).

This dog has it's origin in S. Africa, gets up to around 90-100 #'s
It was breed to hunt Lions.. as in 'African lions'. So i am very interested in this dog for trailing cougars here on the ranch. "Just to run them" Just for 'show, and photography'.

So, if any of you guys have one, or have had, etc. i would like to hear all you can tell me 'about your experiences' with this breed.

in fact, i am making a post of this as well, hoping to "catch someones eye on this."

Thanks!


CanyonMan

El Capitan
05-19-2004, 22:22
Originally posted by CanyonMan
We have been thinking about getting a "RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK."
CanyonMan

This following description, from HERE (http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/rhodesianridgeback.htm) actually fits quite closely what I've seen and the few I've met.
Especially the part about being protective. Theres a local 7 year old female that likes to play with other dogs off leash, but is a little defensive on leash, and don't try and touch her owner's kids unless you want to get bitten.
They are beautiful dogs, and seem very powerful and fast, as this website says. But most I have seen don't quite come across as "dumb-loving" as Labs or Goldens, but if that's not your primary concern, it seems that their temperment is good enough.

A fine hunter, the Rhodesian Ridgeback is ferocious in the hunt, but in the home it is a calm, gentle, obedient, good dog. Good-natured, but some do not do well with children because they do not want to be pestered or played with roughly. They are intelligent, cunning but straight-forward dogs that are loyal to the family, have something of a mind of their own, are brave, vigilant, reserved toward strangers, and possess considerable stamina. This breed needs thorough obedience training, socialization with people and other dogs, and firm owner leadership to become the excellent companion he can be. Ridgebacks react best to an extremely consistent and equable approach to training. They are intelligent and learn quickly, but they are also strong and a bit stubborn. Training should be gentle and start young while the dog is still small enough to manage. They are also very good watch dogs, but not suggested for guard dogs. They are very protective of owners! This has to be addressed during their early training. This breed can be more destructive than a Lab if left unsupervised! Do not overfeed this breed. Males may be combative with other dogs. Provided this dog meets cats and other pets when it is young, any potential problem will be prevented. Ridgebacks make excellent jogging companions.

El Capitan
05-19-2004, 22:31
You're obviously correct about their history. It's pretty cool stuff, I had never heard any of this:

The Rhodesian Ridgeback
resulted from crosses between ridgebacked dogs originally kept by native tribes
in South Africa and other breeds, such as the Hottentot, Mastiff, Deerhound and
some breeds that are not known. They were imported by Boer settlers in the 16th
and 17th centuries. Its standard, fixed in Rhodesia, dates from 1922. The
Rhodesian Ridgeback was used for many purposes. This impressive, protective
hound could hunt game, retrieve, take care of children, and guard property.
South African hunters discovered that the Ridgeback, used in packs, was very
effective against lions, hence the breed's other name, the African Lion Hound.
The Rhodesian Ridgeback is well adapted to the harsh African environment. He can
withstand very high temperatures and the damp cold of night. It is insensitive
to insect bites and can go without food and water for over 24 hours. The breed
was recognized by the AKC in 1959. Its country of origin is Zimbabwe

CanyonMan
05-20-2004, 09:11
El Capitan,

part of what you sent said the following...

"The Rhodesian Ridgeback is well adapted to the harsh African environment. He can withstand very high temperatures and the damp cold of night. It is insensitive to insect bites and can go without food and water for over 24 hours. "


That sounds good to me, as this dog would need to have these traits to be in the West Tx. elements. :)

There is a lot of very hot and rugged terrain here, and about everything out here either stings, bites, pokes, or scratches you, and there is never enough water. We always welcome rain!

Thanks for all the information. I appreciate it!

CanyonMan

friar
05-28-2004, 17:25
I currently run Beagles. Hard little hunters and will run the heck out of a rabbit. They are a simply a nose hardwired into a brain and an have a one track mind. (pursuit) No pun intended.

Used to raise, train & hunt over labs, they are great dogs and very versatile and aim to please their master. We hunted ringnecks, ducks, geese and grouse with ours.

El Capitan
05-28-2004, 22:42
Snoopy hunts? I never realized that about that breed!

A_Swede_17_1911
05-28-2004, 23:57
I have a German Short Hair Pointer, i love that dog just wish he was here in North Carolina with me. We did just get a pointer/lab mix puppy,, her nick name is trouble dog, cause well she always finding trouble. The German Short Hairs a very versitle dog, along with labs also Brittany Spaniels, some people will tell you a Brittany isnt a spaniel cause they point. There a neat dog, and there not quite as large the Brittany my brother had was a great dog, loved the water, and was birdy. My short hair is very birdy too, but i expect that from a bird dog.

Walter45Auto
05-29-2004, 00:48
Brittany Spaniels are pretty versatile hunting dogs, from what I hear, oh and they're great family dogs.

www.dogbreedinfo.com



;g

Craigster
05-29-2004, 13:26
My best friend and I have raised and enjoyed Britts' around the house and in the field for almost thirty years. We have two, my best friend has one, my two daughters have one each, my next door neighbor has one and another friend just took one of our pups.

Mine are with me every day, sleep at the foot of our bed, clean the faces of our grand children, welcomed at Elk camp and are amongst the best when it comes to doing what they love to do; Hunt Roosters.

CanyonMan
05-30-2004, 16:48
Just found some more people hunting hogs with the RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK,
Here in Texas...

Knew they would be great hunters... Just a matter now, of Working with the Vet to find a breeder that is using the bloodline for hunting Mountain Lion.

I appreciate all the info; you guys have shared with me on this breed.


CanyonMan