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hapuna
05-06-2004, 21:08
So I went in for my physical today and I passed of course, but the doc was a bit pissed at me cause I put down that I was taking VIOXX for some tendonitis in my heel where the achilles attaches. Now I only have 20 more days to go on the treatment but he was not amused. He said that admin folks at the FAA often kick back the medicals due to innocent stuff like this. He wrote all kinds of notes on his submission so that it wouldn't come back. He said one time someone wrote ADVIL on the thing and it was kicked back and he had to fight to keep the medical valid.

Dealing with the FAA on this stuff must be a real joy huh?;b

Texas T
05-06-2004, 21:33
So what are they going to say about my viagra? ;P ;)

Wulfenite
05-06-2004, 22:48
How can they complain about a pilot with a little extra lift?

4TS&W
05-06-2004, 23:18
Originally posted by Wulfenite
How can they complain about a pilot with a little extra lift?

They're complaining about too much "junk" on the plane! ;P

hapuna
05-07-2004, 00:43
Originally posted by Texas T
So what are they going to say about my viagra? ;P ;)

There's probably a concern you'll get it caught in the yoke?? Also it would be evidence that you are focused on something other than flying the plane!!:cool:

Wulfenite
05-07-2004, 07:56
"Pull Up PUll UP, We're all gonna die"

"I cant there somthing caught in the Yoke,..... and it keeps resetting my GPS."

M2 Carbine
05-07-2004, 07:59
In 63 I was sent to an Air Force flight surgeon for my Army flight school physical.

Like an idiot I put down I had gotten air sick in the past.

The Doc was ready to bust me.

I told him that was in 1960, riding in a Skyraider on 5.5 G practice bombing run pullouts.
Hell anyone not used to that can lose their cookies;f

He still wasn't convinced until I told him since then I had gotten a Private license, owned a plane and flew all the time.

He told me, don't put down stuff like that on a physical.;)

Wulfenite
05-07-2004, 09:11
Yeah, that's one of the things somebody, either the ground school instructor or CFI should cover. "How to get your medical."

Andrew Tacquard
05-07-2004, 15:12
For years military flight surgeons have not allowed anything over the counter, to my knowledge. At my last command they were telling us we could take ibuprofen for minor pains. Also someone finally convinced them powdered protein was ok. With all the over the counter meds & supplements out there I can see why they play it safe and tell us nothing is allowed (not being sure how each individual drug/supplement will affect someone flying).

Texas T
05-08-2004, 07:41
This thread is one of the reasons I hope the suggestion for a driver's license being substituted for a medical gets approved. I think it's for either or both of the sport and recreational licenses.

Wulfenite
05-08-2004, 13:55
Originally posted by Texas T
This thread is one of the reasons I hope the suggestion for a driver's license being substituted for a medical gets approved. I think it's for either or both of the sport and recreational licenses.

Not unless the state raises their standards for drivers licenses. IMHO they let old and infirm drive far longer than they should.

hapuna
05-09-2004, 13:20
Originally posted by Wulfenite
Not unless the state raises their standards for drivers licenses. IMHO they let old and infirm drive far longer than they should.

The drivers license is still a good idea. Unlike old drivers pilots have do to BFRs etc to make sure they are still competent. If you can drive a car and kill folks you should be able to fly a plane and kill folks...don't you agree. Again I think if the skills are there it should be OK. Studies have found that the physical is not an indicator of whether or not you will have a physical incapacitation while flying or not. It is against regs to fly if you are not physically fit. You just don't see it happening very often in the pilot population.

Wulfenite
05-09-2004, 14:19
Sure the CFI's can keep an eye on the skill level; although I think the current system puts way too much responsability on the CFI for two hours of work.

The problem with the medical aspect of drivers licensing is that the licensing bureau's dont do anything vaguely proactive. Its unheard of for someone to loose their drivers license for medical grounds unless its in the aftermath of a serrious accident.

Like it or not there are medical conditions which can be identified during a physical that should be barriers to piloting. Flying is very unique with respect to incapacitation in that you cant just coast to the sholder, and that your passanger probably doesnt have the skill to reach over and effectively control their own fate.

I think a system that involved an questionaire that your personal physician could fill out and send in would be better. The FAA could analyze their accident database and identify the medical conditions and drugs that have proven to be issues in the past (seazures, heart attacks, narcolepsy, drugs that make you sleepy or loopy, etc). If all the answers are "no" you're good to go. If there's a "yes" you, your doctor and a medical representative from the FAA get to discuss it.

C150J
05-09-2004, 20:03
So what are they going to say about my viagra?

In all seriousness, Viagra is known to cause problems with color vision and is on the FAA's list. I'm not well-versed on the issue, but I know several people have been restricted to daytime only flights because of the drug (due to problems identifying runway lights). All of this info is several years old, so I'm not sure if anything is different...

J.

Texas T
05-09-2004, 21:13
Originally posted by C150J
In all seriousness, Viagra is known to cause problems with color vision and is on the FAA's list. I'm not well-versed on the issue, but I know several people have been restricted to daytime only flights because of the drug (due to problems identifying runway lights). All of this info is several years old, so I'm not sure if anything is different... At your age I would certainly hope that you AREN'T well-versed on the issue! :)


Physicians at the FAA Civil Aeromedical Institute Aeromedical Certification Division recommend that the medication be used strictly in the dosages recommended by the manufacturer and all contraindications (reasons not to use the medication) be strictly observed. Pilots and air traffic controllers should not use Viagra within 6 hours of performing their (aviation) duties.

I don't know about the rest of you, but if I'm taking the little blue pill I don't have any intention of taking to the skies in the next six hours. Taking to the sheets perhaps, but not to the skies. ;)

C150J
05-09-2004, 21:16
Thanks for clearing that up T! I just remember the hub-bub about it when it first came out...

M2 Carbine
05-09-2004, 22:21
The way I understand it now, your driver's license is your "medical" for flying ultralight and is suposed to be the same for the sport and recreational licenses.

There is still the catch all no matter what you fly, that you are responsible for not flying if you aren't physically fit.

Of course if you are over 60 a constant back ache doesn't count.:)


Then to, for years I've been asking the passenger, What's that instrument over there reading?;f

I once told the base manager that when I lost my reading glasses.
He didn't see the humor in it.;)

hapuna
05-10-2004, 09:52
Originally posted by Wulfenite
Sure the CFI's can keep an eye on the skill level; although I think the current system puts way too much responsability on the CFI for two hours of work.

The problem with the medical aspect of drivers licensing is that the licensing bureau's dont do anything vaguely proactive. Its unheard of for someone to loose their drivers license for medical grounds unless its in the aftermath of a serrious accident.

Like it or not there are medical conditions which can be identified during a physical that should be barriers to piloting. Flying is very unique with respect to incapacitation in that you cant just coast to the sholder, and that your passanger probably doesnt have the skill to reach over and effectively control their own fate.

I think a system that involved an questionaire that your personal physician could fill out and send in would be better. The FAA could analyze their accident database and identify the medical conditions and drugs that have proven to be issues in the past (seazures, heart attacks, narcolepsy, drugs that make you sleepy or loopy, etc). If all the answers are "no" you're good to go. If there's a "yes" you, your doctor and a medical representative from the FAA get to discuss it.
Wulf,
Perhaps you missed the beginning of this thread. The FAA is not capable of handling dealing with even the analysis of everyday drugs like Advil. How in the hell are they supposed to make those types of determinations. The FAA position is if there is something there the default is to deny the medical thereby taking perfectly healthy pilots out of the sky. Check the statistics...how often is an accident in an aircraft due to health reasons....its very rare.

Wulfenite
05-10-2004, 15:52
Originally posted by hapuna
Wulf,
Perhaps you missed the beginning of this thread. The FAA is not capable of handling dealing with even the analysis of everyday drugs like Advil. How in the hell are they supposed to make those types of determinations. The FAA position is if there is something there the default is to deny the medical thereby taking perfectly healthy pilots out of the sky. Check the statistics...how often is an accident in an aircraft due to health reasons....its very rare.

The FAA's work load is the reason why your primary care physician should be making the determination on whether or not you're at risk of incapacitation. This should be falling-off-a-log easy for someone who sees you on a regular basis. The FAA should only be inolved if the Dr. needs more information WRT Flying for a borderline condition or if the Dr. wants to negotiate a limitation.

In your case your Dr. would never ground you for advil and tendonitis. The feds would never do anything more than file your postcard.

BillCola
05-12-2004, 23:00
THe AOPA says that the FAA says that VIOXX is approved, subject to no side effects...

mbsigman
05-20-2004, 22:47
Folks,

The following quote is from the website Aviationmedicine.com, which is the website for the Aviation Medical Advisory Service. AMAS is the company based in DEN that advises thousands of professional pilots on aeromedical issues and is literally the go-to source for airline pilots who have problems with their medical certification.

"Anti-inflammatory/arthritis/pain medications: OTC medications such as aspirin, Tylenol, Advil, Aleve, Mediprin, Motrin IB, and so forth are allowed for flight deck use. Prescriptions for similar medications, including Motrin, Naprosyn, Voltaren, Ansaid, and Indocin, are allowed as long as you experience no side effects after 48 hours of use. As noted above, Vioxx and Celebrex are also authorized. This assumes that the condition that a pilot is using the medication for will not interfere with the safe performance of flight duties."

The key here is the underlying condition MUST NOT INTERFERE with your ability to act as a required flight crewmember.

As a heads up, if you are a pilot subject to drug testing under the FAR guidelines, Vioxx will not show up on the standard DOT drug testing protocol. However, should you be involved in an incident and you are mandated to undergo a drug screen, not only will Vioxx show up but they will be able to determine where the poppy seeds that you ate in your Big Mac were grown. You can bet your bippy the FAA will want to know why you were prescribed Vioxx, and if you're taking it, why it was not reported on your last FAA flight physical if indeed you did not report the fact that you were taking the med.

Mike