Black Bear Defense Really Needed??? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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FullClip
06-02-2004, 03:08
I keep seeing a lot of posts about what defensive type guns and caliber combinations are needed for black bears. Maybe I'm missing something, but have lived in Maine all my life (so far, as the saying goes) and have never heard of anyone being killed or even injured by a bear. I do live in the boonies and have seen them around the house and yes, had one that got to be a pain in the butt with my garbage cans once in a while. Myself, I never worry about them while fishing or hunting small game (rabbits and partridge). My only "close call" was once the ex and I were picking rasberries a few hundred yards from the house and there was a bear on the other side of the batch. The bear took off like a rocket when it sensed us. No change of underwear needed on my part, but pretty close.
Not saying it doesn't happen, but does anybody out there have an statistics on black bear attacks?? Not grizzlies or browns, but just balck bears. I have a feeling we need to worry more about pit-bulls and rotwiellers.

TScottW99
06-02-2004, 03:23
Yes it's needed. Will you ever use it, proably not. There is proably a .00001% chance you will. BUT, always be prepared ;)

Black bears are known for going the other way. Every encounter I have had with them has been this way except one. The biggest concern is if you accidently get between mama and the cub.

Another thing about black bears is, if they attack, they are going to kill you. The stories of playing dead and the bear leaving doesn't hold true with blacks. When they attack, which is very seldom, they do some massive damage.

I don't have any numbers but I can think of two attacks close by in the last couple years. #1 In WV was a teenage boy deer hunting in a tree stand when the bear decided to climb the tree the boy was in. The boy ended up stabbing the bear with his knife, since he couldn't get a shot at the bear with his bow directly below him. #2 Was some tourist idiots in the Smokeys that decided to save a poor fawn from the mean bear ;Q One dead toursit.

noway
06-02-2004, 07:14
{Not saying it doesn't happen, but does anybody out there have an statistics on black bear attacks?? Not grizzlies or browns, but just balck bears}

Well florida has bear ( blacks ) and haven't had a fatal bear attack EVER. We aren't the black bear capital of the world. It is has been proven time after time that more people die in a year from spider bite than black bear attacks and more hunters are killed or injured getting into their tree -stands at the start of deer season then bear attacks.

Make noise as you go about you business, staying alert, and not trying to get close to a Black bear or feeding one and you will be alright for the most part. They are unique creatures but you give them their room and respect and you won't have any worrys.

FullClip
06-02-2004, 07:26
Guess I should have poked around a little on Yahoo before posting the question. It does look like you stand a much better chance winning the Power-Ball lottery than having a black bear ruin your day. Below is the link and an excerpt from State of Maine's "Kid page" with some numbers on USA wide bear attacks. Also looks like most attacks are by "park bears" where they have grown accustomed to people and Twinkies. Still with my luck, don't think it would hurt to have a little back-up handy just in case. Either that or make sure your with somebody you're not too fond of that can't outrun you!!;f

http://www.state.me.us/sos/kids/allabout/wildlife/blackbear.htm
Unlike grizzly bears, black Bears seldom attack humans. According to the National Center for Statistics, 1980-1983, for every death caused by a black bear, 17 deaths are caused by spiders, 25 deaths caused by (from) snakes, 67 deaths from dogs, and 180 deaths from wasps and bees. On average, fewer than three people are killed every year by the more than 650,000 black bears in America. Surprisingly, Black Bear mothers rarely attack humans when defending their cubs.

micah
06-02-2004, 08:13
If you're concerned about a black bear attack, I hope you wear a full body rubber suit to protect you from mosquitos which are far more dangerous.

lazarus
06-02-2004, 08:43
In the east, I am much more concerned about two-legged predators than bears. While there have been some rumors and sightings of mountain lions in recent years, I doubt we have a sizable population.

I always carry a major caliber handgun when afield (usually a .45 ACP or .44 Magnum). My primary focus is humans, but I am sure my handgun would serve in a pinch against a black bear.

On two occasions I have encountered bears in the wild. Both times the bear was making haste the other way.

noway
06-02-2004, 09:42
{On two occasions I have encountered bears in the wild. Both times the bear was making haste the other way.}

agreed.

I myself had 2 up and close encounters with blacks and one being a large bear in NJ. This bear was big enough to kill a human and yet when we returned to the camp site, the bear took one look us 3 humans and split. I can honesty say I wasn't scared nor felt threaten at the time.

But I was very much scared after he ran away. ;)

mpol777
06-02-2004, 14:44
Originally posted by lazarus
On two occasions I have encountered bears in the wild. Both times the bear was making haste the other way.

That's been my experience as well.

It's still good to be prepared. Kind of like CCW around the city. The chance of actually needing it are slim, but when you do you REALLY need it. When I'm out in the sticks I worry more about rabid hippies and rattlesnakes than predators.

J. Parker
06-02-2004, 16:17
This is my observation after 30 some odd years camping/hiking/bashing around the woods of California, Oregon, Idaho, and Washington State. Black Bears in the western states are more aggressive because they have fewer food and water sources. Some of the largest Black Bears of all time have been taken in the eastern states because they have more food and water, plain and simple. Black bears out west are smaller, hungrier, and more aggressive IMO. Just my thoughts, John

MARTIN FISHER
06-02-2004, 22:59
Those stats were pretty cool. But, considering when you are out camping or hiking or just driving in remote areas, you have a chance to come across anything that can kill you. Cougars, criminals, black bears, wolves, snakes, your ex-wife, an escape con, whatever. The chances of encountering ONE of those things may be statsically slim, but when you add them all up, it is better to be armed and skilled.

You are either prepared or you are not.

ithaca_deerslayer
06-03-2004, 09:55
Originally posted by MARTIN FISHER
Those stats were pretty cool. But, considering when you are out camping or hiking or just driving in remote areas, you have a chance to come across anything that can kill you. Cougars, criminals, black bears, wolves, snakes, your ex-wife, an escape con, whatever. The chances of encountering ONE of those things may be statsically slim, but when you add them all up, it is better to be armed and skilled.


I agree.

It is also interesting that few than 3 means more than 2. 2 people a year killed by black bears? Seems to say it can and does happen.

I remember the story of an Olympic level athlete in Canada stalked and killed by a black bear. Most stories I've heard involved stalking. So, evidently while most black bears are harmless, a few purposely decide to go after a human.

Condition white in the woods is no place to be.

sy2k
06-03-2004, 13:53
Yes. I've been attacked twice. Used pepper spray to repel one. The next time I had to fend one off with my mountain bike and handfuls of rocks.

My glock 29 with 200 gr. doubletaps (either HP XTP's or flat point penetrators) goes with me everywhere when in black bear country (I live near the Sierras). Many black bears out here are conditioned to human food and presence and are very aggressive.

Research bear behavior. Grizzlies maul more people yearly because they are highly territorial and foul-tempered with humans. But black bears are more likely to engage in predatory behavior towards humans (as rare as that is).

True - you're not likely to ever be attacked by a bear. I'm sure more people die from spider bites, or get run over by cars, etc. But, trust me on this, you will regret not having a weapon if you're attacked. And why own a gun if you're not going to carry it for self defense?

Dogbite
06-03-2004, 18:21
If it happens to anyone,it could happen to you-- be smart,be prepared.

FullClip
06-04-2004, 04:04
Strange timing, but here's a link to The Bangor Maine news paper article of a black bear shooting that happened just the other day. Don't look like this was a timid one. Seems that along with the coyotes, the bears are becoming more accustomed to people and adapting.

http://www.bangordailynews.com/editorialnews/article.cfm?ID=423703

vafish
06-04-2004, 07:48
Besides black bears, snakes and spiders You also have to be concerned with Rabid animals.

While a rabid racoon or skunk isn't going to maul you and eat you like a black bear could, being bitten by a rabid animal (and the resulting shots) is no fun.

Had a case here in VA last fall where a guy was mowing his lawn and got attacked by a rabid coyote.

Having a gun that is up to multiple tasks is a good thing int he woods.

Marty_G19
06-04-2004, 08:48
If I need to justify my chosen self defense method it's no longer a right (to keep and bear arms), but a privilege subject to revoke at the signing of the next piece of legislation, however to your point, the odds are low, (but not zero), that you would need to carry for black bear protection. Just in the last year or so, here in TN there was a woman killed in the Great Smokey Mountains National Park (where it is currently illegal to go armed) by a black bear, and a baby was snatched from a stroller in a yard by a black bear in New York State I believe it was also...

mhambi
06-04-2004, 09:06
http://www.sltrib.com/2004/may/05072004/utah/164106.asp

http://www.sltrib.com/2003/Jul/07102003/utah/utah.asp



Be Prepared. ;)



saying that, I've spent a pretty fair amount of time hiking and camping in 'bear territory'. Sightings to date:


























zero.

FullClip
06-04-2004, 09:08
Marty,
Please push the veins back into your forehead!! I'm in no way asking anybody to "justify" anything. I was wondering about the odds of Smokey the Bear's evil twin brother trying to snack on my butt is all. As you can see, the odds of a black bear attack are slim, but they are there. It's not the way I want to go out of this world for sure.
Like some of the others that have responded to the thread, I worry more about punks and such while hunting, or more likely, returning to the truck at the end of a hunting or fishing day. Even up here in the sitcks, it ain't like Mayberry anymore. My G20 would be enough medicine for most encounters and used to be "usually" on my hip, but now think I'll make that an "always" unless I'm already packing a rifle larger than the 10/22.
Later,
FullClip

Marty_G19
06-04-2004, 09:15
Originally posted by FullClip
... Please push the veins back into your forehead!! ...

I'm LMAO at you jerk, I was in no way "tense" when I posted that, it was simply a fact of how I view the current status of the right to keep and bear arms. Grow some thicker skin dude...

FullClip
06-04-2004, 09:25
Originally posted by Marty_G19
I'm LMAO at you jerk, I was in no way "tense" when I posted that, it was simply a fact of how I view the current status of the right to keep and bear arms. Grow some thicker skin dude...

Well, I'm not going to worry about the name calling, have pretty thick skin really. Been called a lot worse before amd sure I will again.

I do aggree with you're feelings about the whole gun control situation. All I can offer there is support the NRA and vote.

Marty_G19
06-04-2004, 09:25
FullClip,

Peace offering man ;m

I checked your profile, it seems we have similiar employment. I do contract electrical controls engineering and programming, primarily in the automotive industry, but I have also worked in a co-generation facility at a corn milling plant in central IL. Are you a sparky type also? ;)

noway
06-04-2004, 09:25
Even rabies is a far stretch.

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/rabies/Professional/publications/Surveillance/Surveillance01/Table1-01.htm

209 aniamls in my state for the year of 2001 and 181 being wild, are odds I don't mind taking. I bet their was more than 181 assaults/robberies/car-accidents/attempt-rapes and other criminal acts within my 1sq mile radius of my community in the same year.

If you are so worried on rabies move to HI.
:cool:

FullClip
06-04-2004, 09:29
Marty,
Not to worry. Sometimes my attempts at humor get taken the wrong way. Have a ;c or three on me.
I'm a knuckle dragger type doing some work for Generous Electric in Spain. The 'lectric stuff is magic to me. Right now just waiting for something to break, but seem like these are good machines, thus so much time for the forums. Feel like the maytag man.
Hasta luego,
FullClip

Marty_G19
06-04-2004, 09:33
Originally posted by noway
... If you are so worried on rabies move to HI.

noway, that sounds like something an anti would say to shame someone for desiring to carry. We're much stronger when we stand together. It ain't about fear man it's about principle...

Currently it is illegal to carry in much of the wilderness areas in the country outside of a hunting season and without a hunting liscence. This is wrong because these are the areas where one is least likely to be able to get help from others, regardless of the odds of actually encountering trouble...

A law abiding person should be able to carry everywhere.

Marty_G19
06-04-2004, 09:49
Fullclip, that sounds like my job much of the time... :)

I spent a week by the pool in Mexico once for a steel mill company, just in case they needed me, easy money... ;) I admit, it's boring at times however.

I don't do many overnight trips anymore. I didn't want to miss my kids growing up, so I commute to wherever I'm needed, and sometimes, I even get to work on control programs at home on the laptop, and only go out for the day during startups... Gotta love the new technology ... ;f

Unfortunately, I guess you can't do that for mechanical stuff though... sorry...

noway
06-04-2004, 11:02
{noway, that sounds like something an anti would say to shame someone for desiring to carry. We're much stronger when we stand together. It ain't about fear man it's about principle...

}

(wondering minds wants to know )


How did a post titled 'Black bear Defense Rerally Needed??" becomes an anti-pro debate for CCW'er

Marty, push you vein back into head ;) , I was only pointing out more issues outside of rabies from a coon or skunk and surely bears attacks are more of my concern when out in the wilderness. Nothing was said about pro/con/anti/pros for CCW carry.

{ Originally posted by noway
... If you are so worried on rabies move to HI.
}
The HI statement was due to the fact that HI has never had a single case of rabies since it was adopted as a state.

A_Swede_17_1911
06-04-2004, 15:29
Im from Oregon im more worried about cougars than bears but like someone else said the bears seem to be pretty aggresive out west, usally they run away but I have friends, 2 brothers that have been stalked by both a bear and a cougar hunting up in the cascades, so it does happen. I would be worried about coyotes, skunks, etc with rabies. I dont see a problem carryig in the woods, i would worry about bears conditoned to humans though.

CanyonMan
06-05-2004, 03:15
Well, what the heck, i posted this on another thread a minute ago, and it seems to fit here as well...

BTW..."Marty_G19"

As for "Noway" being an "ANTI,"... Man you missed it. This Hoss is a friend of mine, and he ain't got an 'anti bone' in his body! He is truly a very ethical sportsman, and hunter, and gun owner.
You truly misunderstood the point of his post!

Well, here is what i posted on the other thread about; "Being stalked need Suggestions."


Man! Reading all this, I feel like i am watching the "Mountain family Robinson movie!"

Every time these people left their cabin, they were attacked by something!

This is 'just not the way it is!'

I "AM NOT" saying these attacks 'cannot happen'. I am saying this. How many hours and years have you boys spent in the outback, and "never" been attacked by an animal?

I have never once had a problem in the rockies, or anywhere else for that matter.

Even here on the ranch we have cougars, and on my brothers ranch, he 'guides couger hunts', still no attacks or problems.

Have they truly happened to others? Yes! I 'do not doubt' that one bit. But i would be far more concerned about a wheel falling off a 747 and landing on my head, than i would an attack from an animal in the wild.

I have a good friend that even hunts alaska, the 'very remote' parts, he has 'never encountered' one problem yet.

Again... yes, 'i know this has happened', and can... but the chances are extremely slim, and just as rare.


Again, (so i do not get reply's about 'this case, and that one' etc), I do realize this 'can happen' in a camping/hiking/hunting situation, but it is the 'very last worry' on my mind.. I had a friend that was left all alone by a 'dumb pilot' in the alskan tundra, after he had killed and dressed out a caribou, the pilot took the head rack, cape/meat etc, from the camp, back to the larger base camp, and left my friend there with a 7mm mag, and a 'gut pile'!

They had seen numerous brown bear on the way into the hunting site. Yes, stupid move to be certain...! but even in this, my buddy did not see, nor did he have, any problems. Lucky? Maybe! I realy cannot say.

But all this "scare" stuff about bears, cougars, rabid skunks, bigfoot, and Lord knows what else.. Sorry, but i have never bought into the "Fear factor" of it all.

Cautious? Yes! Scared? No!

More concerned about the two legged exscaped convicts, or the dope growing hippies that still live in the remote's of the northern part of the Sangre De Christo mountain range/s around Taos N.M. and the San Juans, around Durango Co. etc.. which have always been a big part of my stomping grounds... I have friends that have lived in these (mentioned areas) all their lives, they have "never" had a problem..."Even when they had an encounter of some kind with bears/cats."

I am "very sorry" for the people who have had problems/attacks/deaths, etc... But boys, this is not the 'norm,' it is the 'very rare exception'; (and this is the point to my posting!).

A lot of these things are due to 'ignorance' on the part of the campers, and hunters, who do not know how to run their camps/ with food stuff, and ,or, how to use common sense woodsmanship. And Yes, "i know that even the "pro's" have been mauled attacked and killed etc..." Know of one, ( a guide), out side of Durango, Co., mauled by a sow Griz. And 'no, there are not many Griz in that San Juan forest', but only a few. Other guides that are friends of mine, (even in that area), and other places, have had no attacks at all. Again, "it is rare."

So, 'my point' is, 'this just ain't the norm!'

Go build your cabin, and don't watch The above mentioned movie!

In 1977, i Left the ranch in Oklahoma (for a short while), with the wild hair that my wife and i were going to live the "mountain family robinson lifestyle," in the San Juan mountain range outside of, and between Durango Co, and Silverton, Co. Very rugged terrain indeed. The only way to the selected site was to pack in with mules and horses, and all the equipment needed etc.. had great plans... they got folied! (long story).. the point being.. There was never the fear of, 'we're going to be attacked syndrome'! And for what part 'we were there, and did,' we never had problems.... (lots of red government tape though), that will stop you in your tracks faster than a bear will! :(

Oh well... i was bored, and it is late.. Just my late night 2 cents worth! Go and enjoy the woods! carry your gun/s, and use common sense.

And remember... those attacks that 'do happen', do not even begin to tip the scales to "all the ones that never happen!"


CanyonMan

tSuperflyTNT
06-05-2004, 07:44
I wouldn't be worried about a black bear attacking unless you somehow startled it (but bears can hear & smell you coming even if you're being pretty quiet (unless you're downwind and it's already pretty loud out (wind / rain))) or it's defending her cubs.
I would be a thousand times more worried if i came across a moose than a bear. The only wildlife that i've had a bad encounter with is a ruffeled grouse and a family of otters.

lakota222
06-06-2004, 09:04
I cant count how many times a close call with a grouse flushing out from right under my feet has caused me to soil my shorts!;g

TScottW99
06-06-2004, 18:44
Originally posted by lakota222
I cant count how many times a close call with a grouse flushing out from right under my feet has caused me to soil my shorts!;g

Very true! ;a

Have to watch out for squirrels also. The other year I read where a turkey hunter had been attacked by a rabid bobcat during spring gobbler season. One day while hunting out of one of my blinds, I heard something behind me and then it landed on my head! I jumped and about crapped myself. Turned out be a grey squirrel. ;f

vafish
06-06-2004, 20:21
That's when you know you are sitting nice and still!

RugerFan58
06-07-2004, 04:13
My wife and I camp in The North Maine Woods quite a bit. I also hunt there every year. Whenever we see a bear it's running away from us. Unless you get between a mother and its cubs you'll have nothing to worry about. Same goes for moose. Whenever I carry up north its not for the four-legged animals.;f

shrpshtr
06-08-2004, 07:18
i have spent a lot of times in the Blue Ridge Mountains of NC. Camping, Fly-Fishing, etc. i have yet to see a bear in the woods. that doesn't mean i won't on my next trip though. i will always be prepared, just in case. i was expressing my concerns with my family camping, etc. to a couple of different rangers about the "law" of firearms in the forests/parks. their take was if i had to use one for protection of my family, etc. there would be very few questions asked. (given my story legit.) a misdemeanor w/a fine, but not likely even that.

lethal tupperwa
06-08-2004, 08:03
My niece likes to "have her morning coffee" with the one that lives near her house.

I talked with a retired Game Warden with many years of experience of being called to deal with bears.

He told me that after hitting the bears "on the nose with his catch stick" they all left.

The only film of a black bear attack I have seen was of an idiot feeding one Oreos.

When he ran out the bear bit him in the butt.

I may have been lucky although I have seen a few. They (so far) have gone the other way.

AK_Stick
06-11-2004, 03:09
I'm in AK, probably the bear capital of the world, and ew dont have very many attacks up here. Though, that might be because everyone here carrys in the woods.......

Seriously though I'm more concerned with people in the woods than bears, most the time bears will leave if they spot you, and if you pop off a round they usualy beat a hasty retreat.

Marty_G19
06-11-2004, 10:02
Originally posted by AK_Stick
... I'm more concerned with people in the woods than bears...

I agree completely. I apologize for what appears to have offended some. I merely meant to express that if a right must be justified that it is no longer a right but a privilidge...

FullClip
06-11-2004, 10:50
Here's yet another link to the Bangor Daily News in Maine. Article today about a bear trying to get in the house for a pie. Think that the bears must be reading this thread and showing that they aren't so timid after all.;f

http://www.bangornews.com/editorialnews/article.cfm?ID=424160

dougader
06-11-2004, 13:11
Since they banned the hunting of bear and cougar here with hounds these animals have become more bold, coming into town and raiding trash cans, pet food, etc. They had a cougar over by the Sherwood elementary school a couple weeks ago, just a few miles from my house.

Police were called to a school in Gresham awhile back and they killed a cougar there that was in a tree overlooking the playground.

I don't really think I'm going to have a run-in with a bear or cougar, but I still carry for that possibility (and for two-legged critters lokking for trouble).

I've been driving since 1976 and have never had a car fire, yet I still carry two fire extinguishers in my car... same for the house and shop. You just never know, do you?

RugerFan58
06-11-2004, 18:16
Originally posted by FullClip
Strange timing, but here's a link to The Bangor Maine news paper article of a black bear shooting that happened just the other day. Don't look like this was a timid one. Seems that along with the coyotes, the bears are becoming more accustomed to people and adapting.

http://www.bangordailynews.com/editorialnews/article.cfm?ID=423703 I remember some lady filming one asleep on her deck a few years ago and sending it in to channel 6 in Portland. Guess it needed a little more sleep after hibernating all winter. After its nap it just lumbered back into the woods. There's places in Maine where you can regularly see bear during the blueberry season in broad daylight. I bowhunt near such a place.

Rocket Gal
06-15-2004, 22:00
Food for thought...


http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks.shtml

Black Bear Attacks in the News

Black bears are dangerous. They can and do kill people.

Black bears are curious and adaptable. They quickly become accustomed to human activity, which leads to aggressive food gathering habits. Black bear have also been known to stalk people – following them or circling to approach from ahead. Bears will defend their territory – especially if it is a food source. Finally, females (known as sows) are very aggressive in attacking real or perceived threats to their cubs.

These news articles represent only a few of the many recent black bear attacks, but they will give you a pretty good representation of what these animals can do.



Bear Mauls and Kills Infant in New York State
Associated Press
August 19, 2002

A bear killed an infant Monday afternoon as it tried to drag the girl into the woods, officials said. The baby, Ester Schwimmer of Brooklyn, was snatched out of her stroller by the bear at the bungalow colony, police said. Fallsburg is about 70 miles northwest of New York City.

Isaac Abraham, a community leader from Williamsburg in Brooklyn, said witnesses told him the 5-month-old girl was pronounced dead at a nearby hospital upon arrival.

The baby was in a stroller in front of the porch with members of her family, said Mike Fraser, a state Department of Environmental Conservation spokesman. The bear grabbed the stroller and the child, Fraser said. The child was knocked out of the stroller and the bear tried to drag her into the woods, Fraser said.…Read Full Article



Bear Kills 93 Year-Old New Mexico Woman
By Joe Garner
Scripps Howard News Service
August 21, 2001

The 100-pound elderly woman didn't have a chance against a 275-pound bear in the kitchen of her home, wildlife officials point to bears desperate for food as the continuing cause of people-bear incidents

A 93-year-old New Mexico woman was mauled to death by a black bear that broke into her home over the weekend, stunned wildlife officials have confirmed. Adelia Maestas Trujillo of Cleveland, in north-central New Mexico, was killed "by multiple bite injuries," said Scott Wilson, associate director of the Office of Medical Investigator.…Read Full Article



Fatal Bear Attack Shows Need for Vigilance
April 17, 2003
Ontario Forestry Safe Workplace Association (OFSWA)

A fatal encounter between a forestry worker and a black bear in northern Quebec this past spring underlines in the worst possible way the need for workers to be aware of the risk of bear encounters and of how to deal with such encounters.

The incident occurred on April 17, near Waswanipi, a village 154 kilometers west of Chibougamau. A logging foreman with Norbord Industries in Senneterre, QC had gone out alone to survey cut sites for the coming summer. Investigators concluded from tracks in the snow and other evidence that while the foreman was surveying a site, the bear left its den and walked parallel to him for about 50 meters. The bear then moved ahead of him, eventually confronted him and charged. Judging from the pattern of tracks, the worker turned and ran from the bear for about 15 meters before he was struck down and mauled. It’s believed that death was instantaneous. The bear then dragged the worker into its den. …Read Full Article



Bear Attack Leaves Two Campers Injured
- Episode a First at National Park Since Early 1970s
By Tillie Fong
Rocky Mountain News July 15, 2003

ROCKY MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK - Two men were mauled by a black bear while they were camping near Fern Lake, and one said Monday "it was extreme pain and a whole lot of blood," yet he vowed not to be deterred from future outings.

"I just woke up, and it was a blur in my head, then the blood was going everywhere," said Boulder resident Patrick Finan, 22, of the attack early Sunday. "The bear was standing outside my tent, staring in."…Read Full Article



Camper Attacked by Bear
By Matthew Baker
The Salt Lake Tribune July 10, 2003

A black bear attacked a sleeping camper on the Green River early Monday morning, leaving him with bites and puncture wounds on the back of his neck and a laceration across the side of his head.

Nick Greeve, 18, was camping with 14 students and five instructors from the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) at Fret Falls in Desolation Canyon when the bear attacked. Five of the students were sleeping in a circle with their feet in the middle of the circle when the bear grabbed Greeve by the head and neck and tried to pull him from his sleeping bag. …Read Full Article



Black Bear Attacks Hiker
By Kevin O'Donnell
Environmental News
Script September 10, 2000

This past May, a hiker in the Great Smoky Mountains National park -- along Little river trail, near Elkmont campground -- was apparently attacked and killed by a 111-pound female black bear and her 40 pound yearling.

The tragic incident was widely reported in the news media, along with the disturbing detail that the bears had, indeed, eaten parts of the hiker's body.…Read Full Article



Camper Leaps off Cliff to Escape Bear Attack
By Bruce Hickey
The Toronto Star
June 29, 2002

A Toronto woman slipped free from a black bear’s grasp, ran for her life and made good her escape by leaping off a rock into a lake at Algonquin Park.

"I just kept running to the edge of a cliff and jumped into the water," 25-year-old Sylvie Haert, a High Park area resident, said yesterday. "The bear followed me on to the cliff. I swam just a little further away and saw the bear looking at me."…Read Full Article



Bear Attacks, Bites Two Hunters; State to Track, Destroy Animal
By Gary Gerhardt, News Staff Writer
Rocky Mountain News
September 14, 2000

A large black bear bit two Missouri archers Wednesday while the men hunted on the eastern slope of Grand Mesa, the state Division of Wildlife reported. "We aren't releasing their names yet, but believe they went to a hospital in Glenwood Springs, where they should be treated and released," wildlife division spokesman Todd Malmsbury said.

He said the pair, a father, 46, and his son 25, were hunting with a third man from Arkansas. "The bear came out of the bushes and attacked the younger man, biting him…"…Read Full Article



Manitoulin Senior Fends Off Bear Attack
By Margo Little
The Sudbury Star
September 26, 2003
Posted by Ontario Federation of Anglers & Hunters:

A marauding black bear met its match Wednesday night during an encounter with a Manitoulin grandmother who was ready for a fight. The animal was driven off an Ice Lake farm by the protective pet owner wielding a garden hoe. The incident happened just after 10 p.m., said Const. Al Boyd, Little Current OPP community services officer.

Margaret Montgomery, 81, the owner of a farm on Highway 540 near Gore Bay, had released her dog for a run just before bedtime. The dog surprised a bear eating apples from a nearby tree. The bear chased the dog back into the garage, where Montgomery was waiting. She attempted to protect her pet by holding on to the bear and punching it.…Read Full Article



"It had to count" - Bowhunter Saves Son

Nolan Koller had one opportunity to take down the charging black bear that had just mauled his son, Jason — and he pulled it off

By Lynn Burkhead, Associate Editor
ESPNOutdoors.com
September 29, 2002

POCATELLO, Idaho — Many bowhunters know what it's like to be at full draw, aiming at a big-game animal with butterflies dancing in their stomachs. That's called buck fever. But few, if any archers have ever faced the intense pressure Nolan Koller did recently when he made a life-or-death shot with his bow and arrow.

Early on Saturday, Sept. 28, Koller shot and killed a charging black bear sow that had just mauled his 29-year-old son Jason. The sudden attack happened as the Soda Springs, Idaho, pair bowhunted for elk in southeastern Idaho's Caribou National Forest, located not far from the Wyoming border and the Teton Mountains.…Read Full Article



Black Bear Kills Teen Near Yellowknife
CBC News
June 3, 2001

YELLOWKNIFE - A weekend camping trip in the Northwest Territories turned to tragedy Saturday when an 18-year-old man was mauled to death by a black bear.

Kyle Harry of Yellowknife was camping with a 14-year-old female friend about 25 kilometers east of the city when the bear approached them, the RCMP said. The bear caught Harry and mauled him to death.…Read Full Article



Man Injured in Black Bear Attack

Wildlife Worker was Studying Woodcocks near Milaca
By Kavita Kumar
Minneapolis Star Tribune
September 16, 2002

Miles Becker was tracking woodcocks he and colleagues had tagged when a black bear attacked him Sunday in a central Minnesota wildlife management area.

Becker, 24, was listed in fair condition Sunday night at St. Cloud Hospital after surgery. He suffered broken facial bones, puncture wounds to his head and left leg, and a broken fibula.…Read Full Article



Predatory Black Bear Attack
By Jim Lockwood
Newark Star Ledger
August 12, 2003

She was a 5-foot-3, 105-pound hiker, out for a Sunday walk. He was a 400-pound hulking young bruin officials described as "predatory," looking for a meal. She said he came up behind her on a trail in Wawayanda State Park in Sussex County, chased her down and tackled her. She said she did the only thing she could. She threw a hard elbow at his snout, and caught him flush, stunning the bear and giving her time to escape.

"This bear was in predatory mode," said Jack Kaskey, a state Department of Environmental Protection spokesman. "This was classic predatory behavior. The bear was out to eat her. She had to fight for her life." …Read Full Article



Canadian Biathlete Killed in Apparent Bear Attack
WebPosted July 4, 2000

CBC SPORTS ONLINE - A national biathlon team member died while training Sunday, apparently the victim of a bear attack. Canadian biathlete Mary-Beth Miller is dead after an apparent black bear attack while training near Val Cartier. Members of the team identified the athlete as 24-year-old Mary-Beth Miller of Yellowknife, N.W.T.…Read Full Article



Bear Swats Sparta Toddler
By Rob Jennings
Daily Record
May 21, 2003

SPARTA - A black bear swatted a 2-year-old boy outside his family’s home Tuesday afternoon, police said...The 150-pound, 4-year-old female bruin was shot and killed by police shortly afterward.

The bear batted at the boy with the pad of her paw, and not the claws, state Division of Environmental Protection spokesman Jack Kaskey said. Tregidgo’s mother, Amy, watched in horror from inside her Deer Field Road house as the bear approached her young son on the porch steps. She raced outside, picked up her wounded son and called 911.…Read Full Article



Bear Mauls W. Milford Man
By Rob Jennings
Daily Record
May 24, 2003

A West Milford man was mauled by a 150-pound female bear in his backyard Friday as he attempted to rescue the family dog, in one of the most harrowing encounters yet between a person and bear in New Jersey. Rob Skrypek, 35, of 21 Alvin Road, bled profusely after suffering "significant puncture wounds" in the hand, shoulder and head during the 2 p.m. attack, state Department of Environmental Commissioner Bradley Campbell said.

He was unarmed as he confronted the bear, which scaled a 4-foot-high cyclone fence, apparently attracted by garbage on the property. The bruin’s yearling cub was also in the yard, but did not attack Skrypek or his dog, Campbell said. Skrypek was taken to Morristown Memorial Hospital, where he was listed in good condition Friday evening. His dog was clinging to life, Campbell said.…Read Full Article



Woman Fends Off Bear Attack in Her Own Garage
By Clint Austin
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Knight Ridder Newspapers
September 24, 2003

DULUTH, Minn. -- Kim Heil-Smith walked into her garage outside Grand Marais, Minn., one night last week expecting to pull something out of her car. Instead, she ended up wrestling a large black bear.

Heil-Smith, who was talking on a cordless phone at the time, opened the door from her home’s entryway into the attached garage about 9:30 p.m. and found herself face-to-face with a sow and her cub.

"I opened the door and she was right there, between the car and the side of the house. She didn't have anywhere to go, so she came at me," said Heil-Smith, who lives on Devil Track Lake Road north of town. "I tried to shut the door on her, but she was too strong. She wrapped her arms around me and I fell back."

The big bear bit her head, shoulder and both thighs. …Read Full Article



Bear Invades Home - Ordeal for Terrified Mom & Her 2 Children
Vernon (New Jersey) Web News
June 12, 2003

Yesterday morning a black bear bashed through the screen door of a Highland Lakes residence and feasted in the kitchen while a mother and her two children, ages 2 and 7, barricaded themselves in a bedroom.

Lisa Spirko and her children finally got out the bedroom window to safety when police and a biologist from Fish & Wildlife , responding to the frantic call made at 8:30 a.m., arrived at the home on Agawa Road.…Read Full Article



Bear Attack First In California Since 2001

August 18, 2003 (Associated Press) — A bear was killed after it knocked down a hiker in the Angeles National Forest, marking the first such attack in California since 2001, Department of Fish and Game officials said Monday.

The black bear was killed July 31 at Little Jimmy Campground, where the attack occurred several weeks earlier, department spokeswoman Lorna Bernard said. In the July 3 attack, the bear knocked down an unidentified male hiker at the campground,…Read Full Article



Update on Black Bear Attack in Two Medicine Valley…Park Officials to Destroy Bear
June 28, 2000

WEST GLACIER, MONT -- Glacier National Park rangers continue to search for the black bear that attacked and injured a hiker in the Two Medicine Valley on Monday, June 26, 2000. Because of the bear's aggressive behavior towards humans, it will be destroyed when located, in accordance with the guidelines of the park's Bear Management Plan.

Jason Sansom, 24, of Malstrom Air Force Base in Great Falls, Montana suffered puncture wounds to both arms after an unprovoked attack by a brown-colored black bear on the south shore trail of Two Medicine Lake on Monday afternoon. Sansom and his wife had been on a day hike when the incident occurred. His wife was not injured.…Read Full Article

TScottW99
06-16-2004, 04:46
Bear shot, killed at Franklin County hospital

A full-grown black bear was shot and killed after it wandered into Carilion Franklin Memorial Hospital on Tuesday night, officials said.
Franklin County Sheriff Quint Overton said the 300-pound male bear was first spotted walking down West Court Street in Rocky Mount. When the bear wandered in front of the hospital nearby on Floyd Avenue about 9:10 p.m., it activated the sensor that opens the hospital's doors. The bear walked through a couple of hallways and into a computer room with glass windows, said Lt. Karl Martin of the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. Two Rocky Mount police officers were nearby and yanked the door shut behind the bear, he said.
Officers planned to sedate the bear, but because the hospital was nearly full they were worried what could happen if the bear were to get loose. An officer shot the bear twice and its body was removed before 10 p.m., Martin said.
No one was injured, Martin said. The computer room sustained only minor damage, caused by the bear's bodily fluids.
- Shawna Morrison

http://www3.roanoke.com/news/roanoke/6589.html

Who says you need to be in the woods? ;g

sy2k
06-16-2004, 09:25
Excellent posts!

I can attest to how dangerous a black bear can be.

Maybe the 'What to carry in bear country' posts get done to death, but it's always interesting to me, nevertheless. Many bears around here don't even hibernate in the winter. They just get up once a week for trash pick up days.

For me, 10mm. Long guns are just too heavy for backpacking.

ChesCopPodz
06-16-2004, 09:44
Reminds me of the ovie "Shoot to Kill" and the scene when they come across the bear in the woods. "Maybe I should shoot it" "Nah, that'd only piss him off"

kenny31
06-22-2004, 19:58
Well....... here's the thing. Damn environmentalists took away bait and hounds and the population is out of control. Both bears and cougars are out of control. Shot a cougar this year, 8' long with a 6' tail. The bio guy from the state didn't give me an age, but he was impressed with the size of it. Bears are much the same. Our biggest problem are the deserted camps that are left around. People who pick beargrass and huckleberries (trying to stay PC here) tend to set up camp, stay the month or whatever their season is, and then hightail it out of the area. Bears, of course, dig up the garbage and the other crap, and it begins a habit.

We've had several bear encounters here, and it is almost scary. Three bears were shot in early elk bow season because they would try to take the meat. It's common practice to buy a bear tag along with elk if you are hunting early season. It's the way things go out here in the west.

FullClip
06-23-2004, 02:07
Originally posted by kenny31
Well....... here's the thing. Damn environmentalists took away bait and hounds and the population is out of control. Both bears and cougars are out of control.

They're trying to do the same thing in Maine this year. I don't hunt bear myself (can't figure out what I'd do with one if I shot it ;g ) But some folks love it, it brings money into the state and keeps the population under control. Am sure that if the tree-huggers win the referendum, then we'll have a lot more bear problems in the very near future. I'm supporting SAM (Sportsman Alliance of Maine) in the fight against the anti-hunters.

RugerFan58
06-23-2004, 04:06
Originally posted by FullClip
They're trying to do the same thing in Maine this year. I don't hunt bear myself (can't figure out what I'd do with one if I shot it ;g ) But some folks love it, it brings money into the state and keeps the population under control. Am sure that if the tree-huggers win the referendum, then we'll have a lot more bear problems in the very near future. I'm supporting SAM (Sportsman Alliance of Maine) in the fight against the anti-hunters. I read this past winter in "The Maine Sportsman" that over 60% of the SAM rank and file supported doing away with hunting with dogs and over bait. SAM is made up of hunters and outdoorsman...not tree huggers. I know, I belong . In the January or Febuary issue one of the letters to the editor explains part of the problem. Vast tracts of land are leased out to guides and pushes the rest of us out of the prime hunting areas. Sure Maine is a big state but bear hunting is becoming an elitist sport for wealthy out of staters. Hunting for bear in Maine will soon be like NH and VT. It'll be a sport EVERYONE can enjoy. That Maine hunter who wrote into the editor sure opened my eyes. Be Safe RugerFan58

glockandgroovin'
06-23-2004, 19:56
Originally posted by TScottW99
Yes it's needed. Will you ever use it, proably not. There is proably a .00001% chance you will. BUT, always be prepared ;)

Black bears are known for going the other way. Every encounter I have had with them has been this way except one. The biggest concern is if you accidently get between mama and the cub.

Another thing about black bears is, if they attack, they are going to kill you. The stories of playing dead and the bear leaving doesn't hold true with blacks. When they attack, which is very seldom, they do some massive damage.

I don't have any numbers but I can think of two attacks close by in the last couple years. #1 In WV was a teenage boy deer hunting in a tree stand when the bear decided to climb the tree the boy was in. The boy ended up stabbing the bear with his knife, since he couldn't get a shot at the bear with his bow directly below him. #2 Was some tourist idiots in the Smokeys that decided to save a poor fawn from the mean bear ;Q One dead toursit.


That incident with the boy hunting and having to stab the bear happened 5 miles from my home.Local animal rights activists tried to prosecute the guy on animal cruelty charges!!!Can you even stand it?

FullClip
06-24-2004, 08:19
Rugerfan,
I haven't been able to get a copy of "The Maine Sportsman" for several months as I'm working "away". I do get the "SAM News" forwarded with my regular mail. (don't confuse the two magazines). But find it hard to belive that 60% of SAM folks are falling for the take that putting a pile of donuts and cooking grease on a tree stump and then sitting in a tree stand for endless hours is an "elitist" sport. It isn't my idea of a good time, but if some folks like it, and are willing to pay a guide for the set-up, it doesn't bother me. God knows that Maine can use any money it can get for the licnese fees.
What scares me is seeing a devide among hunters where one considers their method of hunting superior than anothers. In example, do you use a dog for hunting partridge or ducks?? If this is OK, then why not for bear. (I don't have a bird dog anymore as I'm away too often and long)
Taken another step, what about using worms and minnows while fishing vesrus a much "purer" and elitist form of fly-fishing?? (I like to fly fish, but not above tossing a night crawler into the brook either) You know that there are some waters fly fishing only already.
As others in this thread have pointed out, when the baiting stopped the bear population increased to a point where the bears become a much more serious nusance.
There are a couple bear guide services close to my house, and I've yet to have any problem finding land to hunt rabbits, partridge and deer, so I don't buy the "vast tracts of land being lost to rich bear hunters" argument either. Am more concerned about some rich folks buying up paper company land and posting it against all use. But, again, it's America, and if they can afford the land, it's thier right.
I think things should stay the way thy are, and if some folks idea of a good time is watchin' the donuts and waiting for a bear, then let them have at it. If their fun is taken away, them maybe our fun is next on the list.
Besides, the idea of having bears running around as plentyful as chipmunks around a bird feeder could make any outdoor activity more of a thrill than I care for.;f

sy2k
06-24-2004, 09:57
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2004/06/22/state1326EDT0085.DTL (http://)

Posted this up in the Black Rifle club, but it seems relevant to this thread. 15 .223 rounds to kill this blackie...;P

sy2k
06-24-2004, 09:59
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2004/06/22/state1326EDT0085.DTL[/URL]

Oops. This link should work.

RugerFan58
06-24-2004, 16:03
Originally posted by FullClip
Rugerfan,
I haven't been able to get a copy of "The Maine Sportsman" for several months as I'm working "away". I do get the "SAM News" forwarded with my regular mail. (don't confuse the two magazines). But find it hard to belive that 60% of SAM folks are falling for the take that putting a pile of donuts and cooking grease on a tree stump and then sitting in a tree stand for endless hours is an "elitist" sport. It isn't my idea of a good time, but if some folks like it, and are willing to pay a guide for the set-up, it doesn't bother me. God knows that Maine can use any money it can get for the licnese fees.
What scares me is seeing a devide among hunters where one considers their method of hunting superior than anothers. In example, do you use a dog for hunting partridge or ducks?? If this is OK, then why not for bear. (I don't have a bird dog anymore as I'm away too often and long)
Taken another step, what about using worms and minnows while fishing vesrus a much "purer" and elitist form of fly-fishing?? (I like to fly fish, but not above tossing a night crawler into the brook either) You know that there are some waters fly fishing only already.
As others in this thread have pointed out, when the baiting stopped the bear population increased to a point where the bears become a much more serious nusance.
There are a couple bear guide services close to my house, and I've yet to have any problem finding land to hunt rabbits, partridge and deer, so I don't buy the "vast tracts of land being lost to rich bear hunters" argument either. Am more concerned about some rich folks buying up paper company land and posting it against all use. But, again, it's America, and if they can afford the land, it's thier right.
I think things should stay the way thy are, and if some folks idea of a good time is watchin' the donuts and waiting for a bear, then let them have at it. If their fun is taken away, them maybe our fun is next on the list.
Besides, the idea of having bears running around as plentyful as chipmunks around a bird feeder could make any outdoor activity more of a thrill than I care for.;f If I can find that letter to the editor from The Maine Sportsman I'll have my wife scan it for me and I'll post it for you. The hunter that wrote it REALLY hunts bear up north. I haven't done it for almost 20 years. If you outlaw hunting over bait or with dogs don't think for a minute you're outlawing bear hunting all together. That 60% of SAM members I told you about just wanted to change the laws for everyone's benefit. The lumber companies do sell hunting leases on vast tracts of land to outfitters. The outfitters want to provide a higher success rate to their paying custumers so they won't let anyone else hunt there without paying them a high fee. That's where it becomes "Elitist" for the guys who either can't afford or don't want a guide. The lumber companies get lowered property tax bill if they leave their land open to sportsmen to use. It's called "in current use". That 60% I mentioned thought that land should be open to all sportsmen, not just the ones who hired guides. After what I've seen myself during moose and deer season up North I have to agree with them. Stay Safe, RugerFan58;c