well, that was interesting [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Bill Powell
06-03-2004, 15:57
one the more interesting places that i visited was panmunjum, on the DMZ. i delivered fuel there, for their stoves, and the fuel tank was on the north side of the compound. i would leave munsan-ni, drive up across freedom bridge, to panmunjum, and practically beg the north korean soldier to let you through the gate, to deliver the fuel. they would pull that little SMG on you in a heart-beat. i don't know why they did that cause they were stealing most of the fuel anyway. you wouldn't think, from looking at that hole in the wall, that a lot history was made there. i saw some recent photos of it, and there's a gazillion dollars worth of buildings there.

you look up on the hills beyond, and see the tunnels with the big railroad guns in them. i say railroad guns, cause they run them out on tracks. you could see all that activity, and realize that not one of those people liked you.

even freedom bridge was a one way bridge, built on an old train trestle from the pusan moscow railroad. i saw where they built a four lane bridge to skip that trip. place seems to be getting boring.

if the fecal matter had ever fallen amongst us, they figured the casualties north of the imjin river at ninety eight percent, with the rest gone on R&R, or emergency leave.

Bill Powell
06-03-2004, 16:35
one thing the MPs had a hard time understanding was that in our one compound we had division quartermaster, post office, and division fuel depot. usually they would listen to reason, and if not that, veiled threats. one of the guys got a ticket (DR) that he could not talk the MP out of. the very next day he was given a load of gasoline to the MP compound. when he had 600 gallons of gas on board, he stopped loading. he then stopped by one of the korean truck wash places on the river, and had them top off his truck with water. for a week after that if you saw an MP on the road, he was driving something borrowed from some other unit.

we had a motor SGT, a sgt furlan, who was prepping some trucks to go to ordnance (i'm aware i left an i out of that word). he dumped all the gas, filled the tank half full of water, dumped that in the creek. after he was finished, he lit his pipe and threw the match in the creek. he caught about a half mile of creek on fire, right through downtown munsan-ni.

we even had the alert sirens figure out. when the siren sounded we would just look at the village. if it was business as usual there, it was business as usual for us.

kawalerzysta
06-03-2004, 17:53
Originally posted by Bill Powell
one thing the MPs had a hard time understanding was that in our one compound we had division quartermaster, post office, and division fuel depot. usually they would listen to reason, and if not that, veiled threats. one of the guys got a ticket (DR) that he could not talk the MP out of. the very next day he was given a load of gasoline to the MP compound. when he had 600 gallons of gas on board, he stopped loading. he then stopped by one of the korean truck wash places on the river, and had them top off his truck with water. for a week after that if you saw an MP on the road, he was driving something borrowed from some other unit.


;z I also enjoed my tour in Korea :)

Bill Powell
06-03-2004, 18:27
where were you in korea? i had a blast over there. stateside posts have an over abundance of time and they use it to think up crappy little make work details. i was there 60 thru 62. i can't imagine what it looks like now.

kawalerzysta
06-03-2004, 22:47
Sept 01-sept 02, Camp Garryowen, B trp, 4/7 CAV. If I'm not mistaken long time ag it was called Cp Essayons, near Munsan, Sonni-Ri? was just outside gates :) Of all things, I remember best soju;V ;f

Bill Powell
06-04-2004, 04:56
both of those sound familiar, but that was a long time ago. the only paved road i saw was hi-way one going north out of seoul, but it wasn't paved all the way to munsan. i remember there were three america beers available to us, san miguel from manilla, and arirong, a UN authorized beer made in korea. beer was fifteen cents, mixed drinks were fifteen cents or a quarter. jim beam was one dollar sixty seven a fifth. average cost for, shall we say companionship, was two dollars. i understand they're paying one hundred fifty a month hardship pay in that area now. just that bonus is twice as much as i made. no civilian clothes, no cars, no nada.

kawalerzysta
06-04-2004, 05:41
Originally posted by Bill Powell
both of those sound familiar, but that was a long time ago. the only paved road i saw was hi-way one going north out of seoul, but it wasn't paved all the way to munsan. i remember there were three america beers available to us, san miguel from manilla, and arirong, a UN authorized beer made in korea. beer was fifteen cents, mixed drinks were fifteen cents or a quarter. jim beam was one dollar sixty seven a fifth. average cost for, shall we say companionship, was two dollars. i understand they're paying one hundred fifty a month hardship pay in that area now. just that bonus is twice as much as i made. no civilian clothes, no cars, no nada.
San Miguel is pretty good. Jug od soju was $10. Basically only 2nd ID is gettin hazardous duty pay. We were not allowed to have cars. Roads are paved now, and very narro except major MSRs. So its fun to operate armored vehicles in there

Cava3r4
06-10-2004, 18:09
I was there from Nov 65 until Dec 18, 66.
I spent about a half year at Camp Ames So. Korea, east of Taejon. It was a security base and I was in Co E, 14th Rifle Inf. (my mos was 11 echo tanker). We all got shipped out when they changed it to the 106th MP Co. and you had to have an MP mos or be a dog handler.
I then lucked out and got sent to Camp Casey which was 7th Inf. Div at that time. I worked on the rifle ranges (Trainfire Committee we had these winter hats with a TF on the bill). That was a gravy job.
used to be 270 won to the dollar. a Shorttimer was 100 to 1000 won depending on how far you were from payday. Steady Yobo's were based on your rank. e-3 was typically 30 bucks, e-4 was 40 bucks, etc.
I never did get a steady yobo but I can tell you I should have brought one home and MARRIED her. It would have been better then that first wife I had.:( She was a real POS.
Oh well, got a good wife now.
I got sent to FT. carson and Nam after this. I enlisted for Armored Europe. When I was layin in the hospital at Fitzsimmons their re-enlistment slogan was "choice not chance". I laughed at the full bird col. and he didn't see my humor.
Bob

Bill Powell
06-23-2004, 08:28
after a stint in the post office, first cav hdqr co., i transferred to 33 rd quartermaster, driving a fuel tanker. that also got me guard duty. we had three places where guards were needed. one was the company area, one was in munsan-ni at the rail head and fuel transfer tanks, and one was at a romote pol barrel farm on the other side of the hill.

well, one evening i was walking my post from flank to flank when i chanced upon a stick stuck in the ground, with a white ribbon tied to it. well, knowing it wasn't christmas or valentine, i figured that ribbon must serve some other purpose. when i got down for a closer look i saw an eighteen inch tunnel through our five rolls of concertina. i pulled up the stick, moved it about ten feet to one side, and went looking for him. when i found him, i fired a couple of quick shots in the air, and started yelling. he took off like a cat, looking for that stick. when he saw it, he dove for his tunnel, and found himself up to his ass in barbed wire. it took me and another guy about five minutes to un-tangle him from that wire. he was bleeding from a hundred cuts, looking totally surprised. he went whereever slicky boys went after park took over the government.

Bill Powell
06-23-2004, 10:00
in the company compound, 33rd quartermaster, 1 st cav division, munsan-ni, korea, the guard paths were sometimes in thick brush and a lot times on steep hills. when it rained our dirt trails became mud, mud as slippery as snot.

we has an ex, or at least ranger qualified 1 st Lt. who liked to sneak up on people and take the weapon away.

one night a newbie, two weeks or less in korea, was walking his post up behind the officer's club and billets. there the trail was especially steep, and since it was raining that night, super slippery. this night the Lt chose to slip up on this young man, and grab his weapon. he chose to do it where two trails crossed. about ten feet before the intersection he lost his footing, and went sliding down the trail. the young man got to the intersection just as a flailing, wailing, Lt shot out of the bushes at him. he, the young man, does a proper military butt thrust with his M-2 carbine, and broke the Lt' s jaw in a couple of places. when the company exec went to the hospital to have the Lt sign the court martial papers, the Lt told him the young man was simply doing his job, and if the exec court martialed him, he would personally kick his ass as soon as he got to feeling better.

fnfalman
06-23-2004, 16:43
I was glad to have spent my times with the two Airborne divisions, but I do have regrets for not doing any overseas permanent duty. I got to visit Germany once for REFORGER and Korea once for Team Spirit. But I did manage to go and check out Checkpoint Charlie and the DMZ though. Oh yes, and the Red Light District in both Frankfurt and Pusan.

Bill Powell
06-23-2004, 17:02
i followed some girl home one night in seoul, and once we got into her neighborhood i was the tallest person in sight. when i left the next morning, i looked back at a big sign i walked under, and it declared that whole area totally off limits to U.N. troops of any kind. it was full of spies, and assasins, and other ne'er do wells. i guess i'm lucky i survived the night.

i actually preferred overseas duty, because you were able to work your MOS. in the states they had civilians doing all the jobs, and the army doing gopher work and police call.

the DMZ in korea was pretty wild. at pnmunjum, you could stand in the trench and look at all the big guns, and permanent YANKEE GO HOME sign. the armistice came up for re-sign every june 30 th. there would be a temporary sign saying, GI IN JULY, YOU DIE. we had fourteen alerts while i was there. twelve planned alerts, and two ammo alerts.

i went to laos once, in 1961, for a week. i was an unofficial division sniper, and i went over there to teach laos troops long range shooting. just like here, about one in fifteen understood the concept. these guys were supposed to be providing security f or some of the early air america units, but they had their own agenda.

FatBob
06-25-2004, 10:24
I was stationed in Pan Mun Jom for 1+ year from December 1999 - December 2000. There is a little camp there called Camp Bonifas (Called Camp Kitty Hawk, when you guys were there I think), which is now the "gate" into the DMZ. We ran missions from there to the Pan Mun Jom peace village all night and day. It was still rather tense while I was there. No time off either. Got down to Seoul about once a month for a day or so, that was it. Obviously not what you guys went through, but I know the area like the back of my hand.

Freedom bridge is still there, but not used anymore. There is now a Huge 6 lane bridge about 2 clicks east (on the other side of Camp Howes) although it is so heavily mind and obstructed that only 1 car can go through at a time, and it is an obsticle course at that. At 2100 hrs the ROKA pull a tank onto each end and shut it down for the night. Only way to get through is with a star on your collar.

I think our moto was "in front of them all." The rest of the 2nd ID was "stands alone." I know that Camp Howes was the forward observer for Gary Owen and Stanley. Yet we were 5 clicks north of Camp Howes(very comforting).

Bill Powell
06-25-2004, 10:43
when i was there, when the road MS-1 started through munsan-ni, we were the quartermaster unit on the right. i can't remember the name of our camp, was it gary owen? i know it was a very short jaunt to freedom bridge. there used to be four guard posts around freedom bridge that consisted of four old tank turrets, with guns trained on freedom bridge. if TSHTF their job was to fire the rounds in the ammo rack, and bug out. about half way between munsan-ni and freedom bridge was a favorite spot for infiltrators to set up an ambush, and blow the hell out of some jeep full of guys, and haul ass for seoul. they got away with it til they brought in the first ROK marines as a counter infiltration unit. shut that activity way down. i was there in 60,61, and 62, cause i eleven days short when some butt hole built a wall in berlin, and i got extended 90 days.

since our company had three compounds, we had a guard truck that ferried the troops to the three posts, and in doing so, went through munsan-ni. i got to thinking about what i did in town, and started catching that guard truck to town wearing nothing butt a rain coat and shower shoes. i can't imagine that place with modern cars, and all that goes with it.

FatBob
06-25-2004, 15:30
Munsan is still there. Fairly busy little town for being in the middle of nowhere. Mostly I think because it has a train depot, and a bus line. Otherwise it wouldn't be much but a small market for the locals. Gary Owen was on the east end of Munsan, there is another camp right near it, I think it was Stanley but not entirely sure.

I remember being there during the Monsoons in July and watching a bunch of the "Happy Mounds" (family grave sights) wash away of the side of a hill/feild! Bodies and makeshift caskets everywere! Kinda morbid and sad realy, but secretly funny when you think about it.

Still cant cross the either bridge without permission. (can't cross freedom bridge at all) The ROK Army had a couple big gun nests set up on each side of the new bridge, as well as all kinds of anti-tank traps ON the bridge itself. And huge gates that closed off the bridge when needed. Not to mention the tanks. Also. both those bridges were rigged to blow at any time they wished.

Bill Powell
06-25-2004, 16:06
i remember upriver from freedom bridge was liberty bridge, a wide two lane bridge, and it was wired for sound. i remember during the winter the imjin river itself was a freeway. there were thousands of footprints in the snow. no korean civilian could live north of the river, so a lot of guys would sneak across the river for a night''s entertainment. i remember one yo-yo was delivering the civilians back across the river when he made a wrong turn at a little gate. he was about four miles inside north korea when he got bounced by a north korean patrol. his company commander had to go up the next day and sign for him. i know when i was there, you could not get off a beaten path. we lost more people to mines than anything.

another problem we were having was people running out from between two buildings, grab the tailgate of a truck to maintain speed, and throw stuff out of the back of the truck. we worked out a signal. anyone that heard three quick blasts of a horn was to lock up their brakes. i was going through a little town south of munsan one day, doing about twenty MPH, maybe a little more, when a slicky boy ran out and grabbed the tailgate of a three quarter ton right in front of me. i hit the horn three times, the guy in the 3/4 slammed on the brakes, and the korean ran into a parked truck at about twenty MPH. he just slid over into the back of the truck, and was dropped at the korean police station.

Bill Powell
07-23-2004, 16:11
Does anyone have any current, or fairly recent photos of the Munsan-ni, panmunjum area?