WOFT/Left-Seaters in OH-58D's? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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C150J
06-27-2004, 14:37
Hi All!

Well, I'm applying to WOFT, what can I say. Once I get home (interning for a federal law enforcement agency in DC at the moment), the recruiter is going to take me to get three medicals (one of the biggest obstacles, I'm sure) and take all the necessary exams. Three former WO's, who I flew with all last summer, are writing my LORS.

IF I get selected, and I still think it's the right decision, I will go through the delayed entry program so I can finish up at Cornell.

On another note, I was wondering what the left-seaters do in the OH-58 (my dream bird)...they're pilots, yes?

Thanks!
J.

TimC
06-27-2004, 16:55
Originally posted by C150J
...they're pilots, yes?

Thanks!
J.

Yes indeed...

C150J
06-27-2004, 16:59
What is division of workload like? What are the primary duties? In LE, the left-seater is usually the observer/communicator, but I'm assuming that it's not that simple in the mil (not that's it's simple in LE)?

J.

M2 Carbine
06-27-2004, 22:52
One of the left seater's duties is to tap the right seater and ask him to please wake up and grab the cyclic.;f

http://img44.photobucket.com/albums/v135/Bell406_206B/407_panel_4.jpg

BTW, don't do this on a check ride;)

Wulfenite
06-27-2004, 23:12
Buck,

What's with the calandar on the panel?

I could understand a clock (although I dont see one there). I guess you must have the long range tanks on that craft.

"Its thursday, gotta land and get fuel."

AirCav
06-28-2004, 10:18
First things first. Early in the program (late 80's) nonrated observers were used in the left seat as artillery spotters. That is no longer the case.

There is no such thing as a "left-seater". All 58D pilots are required to be proficient in both seats. Both pilots are equally qualified.

Okay, let's see....left seat (we call it the "money seat", that's where the money's made ;f )

Program and/or set up and test

-Navigation equipment which incorporates a blended GPS and INS system. (flightplan, targets, battlefield graphics)

-Comm systems (3 encrypted & frequency-hopping + 1 plain ol' VHF and an IFF Transponder. Additionally, an encrypted digital "databurst" comm system used to hand off targets and call for artillery and Hellfire missions, etc)

-MMS (Mast Mounted Sight) which incorporates a Low Light TV camera, video recorder, a TIS (Thermal Imaging Sensor), and a coded laser designator.

-Weapon systems to include a mix of Hellfire missiles, Stinger missiles, .50 cal machine gun, and 2.75" FFAR rockets.

-ASE (Aircraft Survivability Equipment) IR jammer, Radar detector (no, not that kind of radar), and a laser detector.

All of this is accessed through a "glass cockpit" interface but trust me, it's like none you've ever seen. It is truly labor intensive to set this stuff up. It is not "user-friendly" by anyone's definition.

Now we're ready to leave the ground. In flight our left seater is responsible for :

-Scanning for other aircraft, wires, antennas, towers, and the ground (obstacle avoidance).

-Transmitting on assigned radios (spot reports, ATC, air corridor calls, etc)

-Navigating (yes, with a map) for situational awareness and maintaining our "system" nav equipment. Updating the system and modifying waypoints/targets/flightplan as needed.

-Locating, tracking, identifying (friend or foe, shoot-don't shoot), designating, and video recording targets and recon objectives with the MMS.

-Tracking/designating targets during weapon engagements.

-Conducting fuel checks (endurance)(Yes, this is still done manually).

-Conducting Artillery missions both digital and voice.

-Conducting (Orchestrating) JAAT (Joint Air Attack Team) missions. This mission brings artillery, attack helicopters, and jet close air support together on one target at one time. Quite a feat.

-Flying the aircraft when the right-seater needs a break.

I'm sure that I'm leaving something out but you get the idea. (whew, it doesn't seem like they are paying us enough ;1)

AirCav
06-28-2004, 10:23
The Office

AirCav
06-28-2004, 10:26
What's with the calandar on the panel?
It was to see when his next 14 days off was!

(just jealous ;f )

M2 Carbine
06-28-2004, 15:40
Originally posted by Wulfenite
Buck,
What's with the calandar on the panel?
I could understand a clock (although I dont see one there). I guess you must have the long range tanks on that craft.
"Its thursday, gotta land and get fuel."

;f Not in that 407 gas hog.

The clock is digital. Top left under the 73F OAT.



AirCav quote: It was to see when his next 14 days off was!

That's exactly right, except I worked 7 on and 7 off.;f

Wulfenite
06-29-2004, 18:05
Seven on seven off.

What kind of flakey schedule is that? Any way you crack it that's 1/2 assed. ;)

M2 Carbine
06-29-2004, 22:26
Originally posted by Wulfenite
Seven on seven off.

What kind of flakey schedule is that? Any way you crack it that's 1/2 assed. ;)

Throw in a weeks vacation and you're off 21 days.:cool:

So before I retired I had two 21 day vacations a year and still had a few vacation days left over.

Didn't make much money but got a lot of time off.

Not like the big iron pilots. They get a lot of time off and make big bucks to.;f