How often do you WIPE & RELOAD your hard drive? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Viper_Audio
08-08-2004, 19:31
How often do you erase your hard drive (voluntary or otherwise) and have to reload the OS and all the applications again?

For me, it averages once a year. I want to upgrade my Hard Drive from 80 to 160 Gig, and I think it's almost as easy to reload everything.

What does everyone else do?

9mm*starman
08-08-2004, 19:43
The last time I did it, it was due to spyware I was unable to eliminate using some of the more popular anti-spyware programs available.

I'd say that the only time you need to wipe out your hard drive and start over is when you reach the point that you have a major software meltdown. With periodic defragmentation and disk cleanup, you shouldn't have to reload your hard drive until it completely fails.

It also can't hurt to keep your anti-virus and spyware elimination programs current and run them on a monthly basis.

G17-jimmy
08-08-2004, 20:07
once or twice a year

WolfmanGK
08-08-2004, 21:05
With XP? Not since I installed it, the week it first came out. With win 98, a few times every month.

Siren
08-08-2004, 21:09
about every 6 months..just did one today

Secant Ogive
08-08-2004, 22:29
I have done what you describe only once. I had an original computer for about three years that had a bunch of crap on it from the OEM. After noticing some mysterious behavior, I found that I had a backdoor virus and my repair effors were in vain. That's when I decided to reformat and rebuild my hard drive from scratch.;P

I got step by step instructions from the mfr., and after doing this my computer had a whole new lease on life. Faster, cleaner, less prone to crashes.

I would recommend this to anyone at least every few years. ;)

FullClip
08-08-2004, 22:45
Been over 3 years on this one and still going OK. I do a defrag weekly, but don't want to mess around with a major overhaul until I get home. If I loose my e-mail, Quicken or internet abilty while on the road I'd be sceeee-rude!;P It is getting slower though and some programs crash or lock up at times.

Think I'll just buy a new laptop when I get back, transfer some files, wipe this hard drive and donate this laptop to a niece or nephew in school.

Dieseler
08-08-2004, 22:54
As needed basis, which usualy ends up once per year. I hate doing it, but things run so much nicer afterwards

gudel
08-09-2004, 00:37
Originally posted by WolfmanGK
With XP? Not since I installed it, the week it first came out. With win 98, a few times every month.

like he said... with the win9x flavor, usually 3 mos for me. for win2k/xp, i think it's twice for win2k, once a year, and never reinstalled since the last time i installed xp!

sgtlmj
08-09-2004, 04:21
Used to be at least once a year. It was always kinda fun to put everything back on fresh. I used to zero-fill the HD to make sure I got all the junk off.

Now that I have so much software, patches, drivers, etc. on my PC, I don't really have the time to sit down and re-do everything anymore. I just stuck a 160Gig HD in an external housing for my backups in case something does go horribly wrong.

Plus, I just switched to Mac, so the PC only gets turned on a couple times a week. :)



http://www.glocktalk.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=271532

HerrGlock
08-09-2004, 04:28
When I change computers.

DanH

IndyGunFreak
08-09-2004, 04:42
With all the PC questions here the last few days, you'd think Eric shut down Tech Talk

IGF

Eddie C.
08-09-2004, 07:29
;h

M2 Carbine
08-09-2004, 08:35
Hardly ever.

If I go to a bigger HD I Ghost the old drive to the new one.

Locke
08-09-2004, 18:35
With my work laptop, it's once or twice a year (less since I started using VM's for testing stuff :) )

At home, I just wiped this PC and reloaded XP, XPSP2 clean on a new HD; slaved the old drive as D: so I can move data files over.

They do accumulate "junk" over time; Web page applets, spyware, stuff you tried once that didn't really uninstall, etc.

XP SP2 *should* help eliminate the accumulation of some of that stuff...

ronin_asano
08-09-2004, 19:22
Originally posted by Viper_Audio
How often do you erase your hard drive (voluntary or otherwise) and have to reload the OS and all the applications again?

For me, it averages once a year. I want to upgrade my Hard Drive from 80 to 160 Gig, and I think it's almost as easy to reload everything.

What does everyone else do?

i hate this myth.

never. there is no point to doing this, it gains you nothing but extra work.

if you properly maintain your installation, you'll never have an issue.

jrny
08-09-2004, 19:45
Originally posted by ronin_asano
i hate this myth.

never. there is no point to doing this, it gains you nothing but extra work.

if you properly maintain your installation, you'll never have an issue.

I properly maintained my installation once, but then I had to turn on my computer... ;f

sgtlmj
08-09-2004, 20:16
Originally posted by ronin_asano
i hate this myth.

never. there is no point to doing this, it gains you nothing but extra work.

if you properly maintain your installation, you'll never have an issue.

;z Hardly a myth. I have been running Windows continually on multiple machines pretty much since 3.1. I have repaired and tweaked and maintained 'till I'm blue [screen of death] in the face.

Windows just accumulates junk over time. I just had to dig into the system manager on my PC because ?!?somehow?!? it decided to totally disable the Automatic Updates tab in my properties. WTF? I don't download or run garbage, I have a good virus checker, scan for spyware all the time, defrag, keep my email limited to plain text w/ no attachments, hardware firewall, don't surf bad places, and on and on. I MAINTAIN the shiznit out of this thing, and it still thinks it's some kind of organism. Keeps changing and growing on its own. My Mac, on the otherhand is like a rock. When I open the lid, things look exactly like they did when I closed it. No surprises.

ronin_asano
08-09-2004, 20:42
it *is* a myth. i have never had to format and reinstall because 'junk' accumulated. that's since 3.1.

properly maintained systems do not need to be reinstalled.

sgtlmj
08-09-2004, 21:08
Originally posted by ronin_asano
it *is* a myth. i have never had to format and reinstall because 'junk' accumulated. that's since 3.1.

properly maintained systems do not need to be reinstalled.

Uh huh. ;Q They may not "need" to be reinstalled, but they will bog down and not perform the way that they should. You telling me you have just done incremental updates since 1995 and never started with a fresh install? You are missing out on how fast Windows can be if that's the case. Anyone here who has reinstalled regularly can tell you that there are "gains" to doing it. C'mon, I know you want to. Succumb to the peer pressure. ;j

Dell, Gateway, Compaq/HP all include restore discs with their systems, and in a last resort, the tech guy will have you bust one of those things out. They are a desirable item for some as evidenced by the number of those things that sell on eBay.

Locke
08-10-2004, 06:46
Originally posted by sgtlmj
Uh huh. ;Q They may not "need" to be reinstalled, but they will bog down and not perform the way that they should. You telling me you have just done incremental updates since 1995 and never started with a fresh install? You are missing out on how fast Windows can be if that's the case. Anyone here who has reinstalled regularly can tell you that there are "gains" to doing it. C'mon, I know you want to. Succumb to the peer pressure. ;j

Exactly. Either a) you do *no* maintenance and the performance remains the same or b) you update video, printer, peripheral drivers, patches, hotfixes, service packs, new OS and application versions... and many of the above are poorly written and do not properly uninstall or do not properly upgrade their predecessor... If you use USB devices, same thing. The "stuff not cleaned up" does accumulate (check your registry!).

Now, if you have a standalone PC without Internet connectivity, you could run old versions with no updates and have good performance at (fairly) low risk. If you're connected, you need to do updates to maintain the system. This is why companies often use standard workstation images; and update the whole image in one fell swoop.

ronin_asano
08-10-2004, 09:14
Originally posted by sgtlmj
Uh huh. ;Q They may not "need" to be reinstalled, but they will bog down and not perform the way that they should. You telling me you have just done incremental updates since 1995 and never started with a fresh install? You are missing out on how fast Windows can be if that's the case. Anyone here who has reinstalled regularly can tell you that there are "gains" to doing it. C'mon, I know you want to. Succumb to the peer pressure. ;j

Dell, Gateway, Compaq/HP all include restore discs with their systems, and in a last resort, the tech guy will have you bust one of those things out. They are a desirable item for some as evidenced by the number of those things that sell on eBay.

yes, that is what i'm telling you, and i'm telling you i have never had a problem. i work in it for a living, and no one i know subscribes to this myth.

Dieseler
08-10-2004, 09:37
Please, do fill us in on how to "properly maintain" a computer so that none of us have to reformat ever again!

Because personally, I have not discovered this secret yet! Loading and un-installing programs does leave *junk* behind. Even if you use that programs uninstall program, I have yet to see an uninstall that doesnt leave files, dll's, registry keys, ect left behind.

Locke
08-10-2004, 09:45
Originally posted by ronin_asano
yes, that is what i'm telling you, and i'm telling you i have never had a problem. i work in it for a living, and no one i know subscribes to this myth.

<sarcasm> Really? </sarcasm>

So... you prefer to spend literally hours determining which software conflict is creating a problem over simply reloading (again, with pretested images, as quick as ~15 minutes)? How... inefficient.

For instance, I took my just-installed XP/SP2 with Office 2003 PC that I'm typing this on and loaded Nero to burn a CD. Oops, don't have the software key for it, and it's the previous version. I'll hunt the new CD in a bit, cancel the install. Hm, upon reboot - NO CD OR DVD Drives available. Even though it didn't install, Nero made a registry mod that _would have been fine_ if it completed the install, but _blew up CD & DVD functionality_ when I cancelled (even though the program had this option.

I did find the fix and change the registry rather than reload. I do this for a living too. Now, imagine the end user who tries this, then notices a week laterthat the CD isn't working. He's not going to pay for support. "Nothing was changed on the system" And he's got a mysterious problem. The only solution for a Dell (or whatever vendor) is give him the restore CD - it's obviously a software issue.

Software is so *cheap* these days because the support costs have been removed. WordPerfect (a plain text word processor, back in the day) was around $500, but supported printers for good output prior to standardized print drivers and you would get spectacular support. Now, you pay for support a la carte.

sgtlmj
08-10-2004, 10:05
Originally posted by ronin_asano
yes, that is what i'm telling you, and i'm telling you i have never had a problem. i work in it for a living, and no one i know subscribes to this myth.

;Q Define "work in it for a living" While it is not my primary source of income, I am the designated IT guy for our City. I work closely with lots of folks who have an alphabet soup of MCSE, A+, etc. after their names, and they all subscribe to the "myth" of a clean install works best.

I keep my HD partitioned with all of My Document and data files on a separate partition from the OS. That way I can reformat and reinstall Windows WHEN it gets squirrelly.

SP2 seems to be humming right along. I think I'll do a reformat and a clean install because it's been almost a year and a half since I've done it. More and more strange things keep popping up, and I MAINTAIN this thing!

RonC
08-10-2004, 10:23
Back to the original question.

Regularly with Win 98 (must have a timer...)

With Win XP and Apple Mac OS (Version 3.x to 10.x,) never.

gwalchmai
08-10-2004, 20:16
I'm about due on this box.

Ronin, you must know something all the rest of us don't.

cannoncocker
08-11-2004, 09:27
Never but i dont screw around with too much stuff on it.Im not super knowlegable about computers just use them for the things i need to and thats it.Ive never had any courses or i would know more.
rod

ronin_asano
08-11-2004, 11:30
Originally posted by gwalchmai
I'm about due on this box.

Ronin, you must know something all the rest of us don't.

heh. must be, because i have never had a problem. i have a crusty old 486 out there in the living room which came with 3.1 on it. i upgraded it to 95 (on 13 floppies) when that came out, and the only other thing i have done is to max out the memory in it. it runs as fast as the day i bought it in 1993.

i have several machines at work, running 2k and xp, also with no issues. the only time i reformat is when they issue me an upgraded laptop.

RonC
08-11-2004, 11:40
Not to start a contest or anything but I still have a Mac SE dating from about 1987 running Mac system 7.1. Still boots in 30 to 45 seconds and has run flawlessly. I gave my Mac Plus with external hard drive away about 5 years ago. The SE is now virtually retired. Used it to do my taxes in Excel until a couple of years ago. Now, it is used primarily to reload an X-10 remote controller that controls exterior and interior lights (when the wife unplugs the controller or we have an extended power outage.)

At home we primarily use an iMac and an iBook, networked, running Mac OS9 and OSX respectively. Never had disk problems with either of the new machines or with the two older machines.