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cellison1460
08-23-2004, 13:57
I just took my physical for LE job and passed everything fine except for the bench press. I have to do my body weight which is 165, I was able to do 135 easily. It is on some universal that is older than dirt. Can anyone give some suggestions on what a good workout might be, I have to go back on Oct 1.

Thanks,
C. L. Ellison

ateamer
08-23-2004, 14:12
Bench twice a week, once heavy, once lighter. The first workout, start with three sets of six (as much weight as you can handle with proper form for six reps). Every week, reduce the reps by one and add some weight until you reach a new one rep max. The second day, do three sets of 10 with moderate weight.

That should help you get to benching bodyweight. Also be sure to do shoulder work and lat work (pullups and rows).

USPMAN
08-23-2004, 19:31
Wear a bench shirt. If they won't let you, then do about 4 sets of 5 with 135, 4 or 5 days a week, never to failure. Go to your book store and buy "Power to the People" by Pavel Tsatsouline or overnight it from the internet. Even though the press is only briefly mentioned, his lifting techniques and programs will have you laughing at 175 by that time.

Okie with a g27
08-23-2004, 22:16
The main thing is....your gonna have to work out. Your not gonna get 165 1.5 months later by sitting on your butt (not that you do that). Do as the earlier posters have said, but work out AT LEAST 3 times a week (bare minimum).

My friend has been trying to get 185 for 3 months now. When he first started he could get 140. HE STILL CAN'T GET IT!. I'm beginning to think he may be "special".

Wouldn't hurt to do push-ups in your spare time too. GL

California Jack
08-24-2004, 02:14
I agree with Ateamer except on the light day I'd do 5 sets of five with 60% of yor max. Rest 45 seconds between sets and move the weight as fast as posible. Give absolutely 100% on every reps, bar speed is important.

On light day you may want to do some assistance work, maybe weighted dips. Ateamer, what do you think?

And , he's right about lat work. It may not be intuitive, but it helps get the weight moving off of the chest.

Technique may help too.

Jack

saint01
08-25-2004, 09:31
AT LEAST 3 times a week (bare minimum).

I hope that you are not talking about doing chest 3 times per week!!! Please keep in mind that your strength and growth DO NOT happen at the gym. They happen at home when resting. There is ABSOLUTELY no reason to do chest more than twice per week. The key is to keep the intensity up. Research shows that after 1 minute of rest, the body has recovered 80%, and will not recover much more within the next few minutes.

You want you bench to grow? Workout legs! Yeah, it might sound crazy, but working your legs out causes more release of testosterone, which helps to build muscle. Try this program:

MONDAY:
Chest - 4 sets of Bench, 4 sets of Incline Dumbbell
Triceps - 4 sets of Dips (essential, do the machine if you can't do them with just your bodyweight)
- 4 sets of Tricep pushdowns
Shoulders - 4 sets of upright rows
- 4 sets of shrugs
- 4 sets of military press with dumbbells (less stress on the shoulders)


WEDNESDAY:
Quads - 4 sets of squats (USE A SPOTTER!!!!) warmup, then go heavy
- 4 sets of Leg Press
- 2 High rep sets of extensions
Hamstrings - 4 sets of laying leg curls
- 4 sets of standing leg curls (or still leg extensions with dumbbells)
Abductors - 4 sets of sumo deadlifts (use proper form and go lighter)


FRIDAY:
Back - 4 sets of Pull-downs
- 4 sets of T-Bar Rows (again, good form is essential)
- 4 sets of dumbbell rows (make sure that when pulling the weight up, you pull towards your waist and squeeze...contrary to popular belief, this is the correct way to do them)
Biceps - 4 sets of ez-curl preacher curls
- 4 sets of one arm dumbbell curls
- 4 sets of standing barbell curls (use the standard barbell for bench press weighing 45 lbs. and just do reps...do as many reps as you can in each set, meaning go to failure)


That is a breif beginners workout plan. Do that, keep the intensity up, and you will add 30 - 40 to your bench in 1.5 months. DO NOT FORGET LEGS!!!! You will be amazed at the just if you work your legs out hard.

California Jack
08-25-2004, 19:31
FWIW, I agree with Saint about squatting, but was also going to suggest conventional deadlifting. Deadlifting can have the same impact as squatting and you don't need a spotter, squat rack or power rack.


I probably would bench as prescribed by Ateamer or perhaps my suggested scheme on Monday and Friday and than squat or DEADLIFT on Weds.

Slotback
08-27-2004, 09:57
I would even suggest that you add in the old fashioned pushup as well. It's an excellent exercise to toss in. You might even go so far as to have a day-once a week perhaps-in which you keep doing pushups (in sets) until you've hit 500. It's an idea which has worked well for me in the past.

live-free-r-die
08-29-2004, 17:19
What stupid ass put bench press on an LE physical?

It is about the most useless exercise on the planet.

Do you guys have to do pull ups?



PS
Saint,
Not to be an ass, but why would you do shoulders after chest and tri's? Bench uses your shoulders and your triceps are just as important as delts in a Military press. I rehab lots of shoulders from people who got hurt at the end of a chest and tri's day, doinf shoulders.

California Jack
08-29-2004, 20:30
Live Free,
It is about the most useless exercise on the planet.

You don't hear that much, but for the most part I agree. But, it would be pretty hard to compete in a power lifting comp without training the bench. And a bodybuilder wouldn't fair well if he didn't bench.

But for your average athlete, fitness fanatic, or strength trainer I don't think it's the most pratcical lift. It at best is an assistance lift. Bench probably doesn't even belong in the NFL Combine let alone an LE test.

Jack

Matt VDW
08-29-2004, 20:46
Bench probably doesn't even belong in the NFL Combine let alone an LE test.
What would be a better test of upper body strength?

live-free-r-die
08-29-2004, 21:45
Well since you said "upper body" I am going to go with pull up, especially for LE and military.

In football the thing people donít understand is that the strength needed for hitting and blocking is in the legs and the core. If you donít believe me try and push 300 lbs on a cable machine standing up.

A good test for upper body pushing power would be clapping push-ups.


I agree that a body builder needs bench, but bodybuilding is all about size, not strength or power.

California Jack
08-30-2004, 00:42
At the NFL combine, they bench 225 lbs for reps. It is an endurance test not maximal strength. Like LiveFree said, though, core strength is more important. A better test for them would be cleaning a weight, maybe body weight for reps. Not only does the clean come closer to measuring the functional strength need to play football, it measure explosiveness, a much better indicator of functional football strength.

I know you spoke of upper body strength, but please remember, the body is one piece.

The bench is a useless measure of functional strength because, if on the football field, if you are laying on your back pushing a weight straight up, you've been beaten badly.

Football is played on the feet, so strength should be tested on the feet. That way they'd be testing something more functional. A press (more commonly called standing or military press) would be better.

If one still insists on testing strength while off of the feet, Incline (bench) press is still a more functional test.

For the most part, the bench is new in strength testing. Up until say the 70's, strength trainers would ask how much someone pressed not how much they benched.

I'd much rather be strong on my feet than strong laying on my back.


Jack

saint01
08-30-2004, 07:29
Saint,
Not to be an ass, but why would you do shoulders after chest and tri's? Bench uses your shoulders and your triceps are just as important as delts in a Military press. I rehab lots of shoulders from people who got hurt at the end of a chest and tri's day, doinf shoulders. [/B]

The reason that you would do shoulders is becuase they are already pre-exhausted and don't need to then be trained as hard. Bench only worked the front heads, so you still need to work the middle and rear heads. Tri's, if done properly, should have nothing to do with shoulders other than dips, which is just an all around workout. It is called pre-exhaustion and has been used for years by some of the world's top bodybuilders.

I agree that bench seems to be next to worthless, but if that is on the test, then train for it. This wasn't a discussion as to why it was there, and unless someone has the power to get it off there, we need to help cellison1460 get his bench up. I know that the workout I provided, if done properly with the correct diet, will yield the results needed.

Also, I do not disagree that the traditional military press with the barbell is extremely detimental to the shoulders. The barbell in general is, given the fact that there is no room for flexibility from one arm to the next. My doctor, and personal friend, is the team Orthopedic Surgeon for the Cincinnati Bengals. When I had major shoulders problems, he suggested that I get rid of the barbell for military's and do lighter dumbbells until I started to heal. I have been doing that for 3 years now and have not had a problem since.

.264 magnum
08-30-2004, 12:30
I must point out I don't do much straight bar bench work. I prefer dumbbell press.




If you can get away with it..........arch your back a lot on the bench AND draw your shoulder blades close to each other on the bench. This little trick really helps. It sets your body such that your are really doing a partial decline exercise---most everyone can do more weight this way. Sometimes a lot more weight.

Are you tall or not so tall? If you wrap your thumb over the bar-try a few without a wrapped thumb. If not try some the other way.


***Try wide, medium wide and narrow grips. You may well find that a more narrow grip (which seems to employ additional muscls groups) can help. However, lots of very powerful guys use wide grips.



***Try a few reps. (with lightish weight) by dropping your elbows close to your sides at the bottom. If you do this now try a few dropping your elbows way wide (careful here--this can expose shoulder problems).


Arch your back, scrunch your shoulder blades, try different hand positions and bar travels. Exercise your lats, front delts and esp. triceps and you'll get there fast. Eat lots of protein and sleep a lot if you can.

I defer to California Jack and others about specific training issues.
But I'd underscore something Jack said. Don't try to move the bar too slowly. The bench press should be a fairly dynamic exercise.

live-free-r-die
08-30-2004, 17:17
Originally posted by saint01
The reason that you would do shoulders is becuase they are already pre-exhausted and don't need to then be trained as hard. Bench only worked the front heads, so you still need to work the middle and rear heads. Tri's, if done properly, should have nothing to do with shoulders other than dips, which is just an all around workout. It is called pre-exhaustion and has been used for years by some of the world's top bodybuilders.

Saint,

The reason for the high incidence of shoulder injuries after chest workouts is because they are pre exhausted. I would just work shoulders and chest on alternating weeks/days.
Anytime you straighten your arm your tri's are very active, think about a military press it is the same arm motion as in bench.

Last comment:
The worldís top bodybuilders spend more money on drugs, than I make in a year. I know I trained many of them when I worked in San Diego. It is totally personal but I have nothing but distain for what those freaks do to their bodies.

PS Donít take any offence to what I say, I am just highly opinionated.

California Jack
08-30-2004, 20:56
I defer to California Jack and others about specific training issues.

Thanks for the compliment Mag. But I defer to Ateamer. Because he actually competes, I believe he is more qualified than me. I just tallk a fair game.

BTW, your technique advice was right on.

Jack

saint01
08-31-2004, 07:01
Saint,

The reason for the high incidence of shoulder injuries after chest workouts is because they are pre exhausted. I would just work shoulders and chest on alternating weeks/days.
Anytime you straighten your arm your tri's are very active, think about a military press it is the same arm motion as in bench.

Last comment:
The worldís top bodybuilders spend more money on drugs, than I make in a year. I know I trained many of them when I worked in San Diego. It is totally personal but I have nothing but distain for what those freaks do to their bodies.

PS Donít take any offence to what I say, I am just highly opinionated.

With all due respect, I am going to take the word of a professional orthopedic surgereon for a pro NFL football team over your's. I too don't mean any disrespect, but up to this point, since I am yet to see your resume, he has more crediability than you.

I have been training for over 12 years. I have had injury's and have worked through them, working with my doctor to ensure that these don't happen again. Again, you might have been training for longer, but to this point you haven't shown me anything that proves me wrong.

Pre-Exhaustion is a workout that is used by more people that just the top-superfreaks that you speak of. It simply is nothing more than taking a muscle and just finishing exhausting it. It could be argued that if you bench, then do incline dumbbells, and then fly's, that your bench was your pre-exhaustion for your pecs. It really is basic common sense.

Let's be honest here. Most injury's occur because of either stupid people trying to move more weight than they should, or improper form. That is what it really burrows down to. I can't tell you how many injury's I have seen over the years from guys throwing weight around only to tear a biceps, or a rotator cuff. Yes, straight bar military is hard on the shoulders, but I didn't propose that. And no, pre-exhaustion doesn't cause injury's. Show me one study that proves that it does. It is really a very simple technique to just finishing off a muscle. Based on your arguements, every person that does Chest and Tri's on the same day then is prone to injury. And we both know that is absurd, as you rdo chest first, thus pre-exhausting your tris, and then finish them off. This is not different other than adding your shoulders to the mix.

Finally:
While I do not agree with their 150k a year drug usage, they still do train extremely hard and eat very strictly, which in my opinion counts for something.

What I honestly can't stand, are people that start spouting off about how all the IFBB people are drug users and nothings and blah blah blah, as soon as anyone mentions the top bodybuilders. YES, they use drugs. Yes they do. But that doesn't mean that they don't bust their asses ini diet, exercise, and weight lifting. You don't have to approve of their usage, but they still work extremely hard in lifting and their dieting. (good example is this...I believe barry bonds used drugs, and if so, should be stripped of certain records...BUT, he is still a better player than i am and a naturally gifted athlete, of whom I still respect as a ball player).

My training partner right now was the US power lifting champion in 97 and 98 and was told that if he wanted to make it to the world's, that he would have to use. He opted not to, which I respect, but to totally discredit all of his hard work and dieting if he had used, in my opinion, is ludicrious. I dont' look at it as a black and white issue.

HammerG26
08-31-2004, 07:11
I would agree with the previous posters regarding the shoulder workout. As an athletic trainer (not personal trainer), I see many of my athletes injuring their shoulders because of Military Press, etc when they are already fatigued. If you insist on doing Military press, then do it on a day when you work out your back. In doing lateral raises (making yourself look like a cross or a "t") don't go above parallel to the ground, you will begin to impinge the supraspinatus tendon (one of the coveted Rotator Cuff muscles).
Good luck.

Hammer

.264 magnum
08-31-2004, 09:03
Originally posted by HammerG26
I would agree with the previous posters regarding the shoulder workout. As an athletic trainer (not personal trainer), I see many of my athletes injuring their shoulders because of Military Press, etc when they are already fatigued. If you insist on doing Military press, then do it on a day when you work out your back. In doing lateral raises (making yourself look like a cross or a "t") don't go above parallel to the ground, you will begin to impinge the supraspinatus tendon (one of the coveted Rotator Cuff muscles).
Good luck.

Hammer

HammerG26,
In your opinion are dumbbell "military" presses easier on the shoulder joints than straight bar military presses?

California Jack
08-31-2004, 11:48
I find this Pressing causes shoulder problems odd. In my limited experience, the people I know with injured shoulders injured them most often benching followed by weighted dips. These people turn to pressing and incline benching as their pressing exercises.

Also, if you read about the old timers, Davis, Kono, Sandow, Hackenschmidt, Skee,etc. I don't think you find them complaining about shoulders. All or in some cases most of their pressing was done overhead. I tend to think that the combination of benching with pressing may exaserbate the issue.

FWIW, I don't bench. I press (barbell and dumbell) and dip. My only pain was the AC joint (due to too fast a descent on the dips). A short stint of just bodyweight dips took care of that.

One more thing I find odd is tht an orthopedic surgeon for a football team attributes shoulder problems to overhead lifting. Does he think some of the problem may be attributed to people violently slamming their shoulders into fast moving large people?

Oh yeah, The Bengals? Are they still in the league?

;c :) :cool: ;a

Just a few thoughts.

Jack

paccw
08-31-2004, 16:34
OK you want to beat the bench press here is how.
First you need to eat 150 grams of protien a day RED MEAT chicken and turkey...sounds easy but in a week you will be hating me.
3 days a week you need to do bench press heavy not to failure ...then light to failure...then heavy not to failure.You pick the 3 days spread them out and listen to your body for when it feels right.
EVERY other day I want to see you on a bike or running machine you don't have to squat just work those legs.Save all lifting for upper body.
LAST AND MOST IMPORTANT ...IT'S MIND OVER MATTER GET DOWN RIGHT ANGRY WHEN YOU GO TO BENCH 165lbs..."IT CANNOT BEAT ME!!" should be the only thought in your mind.

California Jack
08-31-2004, 19:57
Pac,

I think I diasagree with a lot of what you recommended.

1) Why just get protein from meat. Egg and whey proteins are valuable too. Are you suggesting meat for the creatine?

2) Benching 3 times per week is probably excessive. Unless volume and intesnsity are low, most people can't recover from this workout plan. Especially since you recommend going to failure once per week. I suspect that for many this would quickly result in overtraining.

3)Unless you are talking about sprinting and velodrome type bicycle riding, running and biking will probably be counter productive. The reason people recommend squating is that squatting can result in higher levels of testosterone. While some studies show anaerobic exercise can increase HGH, longer aerobic type biking and running will reduce muscle mass and strength. After all, how many marathoners have big benches?

Jack

paccw
08-31-2004, 20:17
He doesn't have 6 months or a year .
There is no time for slow and steady...we have to adopt a fitness plan like football players would take.
We have to leave out legs so the upper body has time to recover...no sense running the body down doing squats it will not help his bench press.
And when I talk about protien I want good protien not things like peanut butter and milk counted in for the 150 grams of protien for the day.
If he wants a life long work out plan we can talk . But right now we have a bench press test to pass and should only focus on that .

paccw
08-31-2004, 20:22
I should tell you also I am 168 lbs and can bench 210 lbs.
I was never the biggest person as a senior in high school I only was 135 lbs.Also I never hurt myself lifting weights.I may not look the biggest but I am fit and know how I got this way.

HammerG26
08-31-2004, 20:44
.264 - Yes, but only somewhat. The nice thing about dumbbell presses is that you can do lower weight, focusing more on form, and not have to go completely vertical (you can allow your hands to work outside the width of your shoulders), thus reducing the stress on the shoulder. Further, by using dumbbells, you also work the smaller muscles (or secondary muscles - i.e. the deltoids,) to stabilize the shoulder, rather than relying on the bar. Hope this helps - if not, let me know.. will try again. :)

Good luck.

CEllison -
Something noone else has asked (or that I did not see)... where did you fail? Meaning, could you not get it off of your chest? Could you not "lock it out"? Depending on your answer, that could tell you what to focus on.

California Jack
08-31-2004, 20:45
I now he has 6 weeks,and for this very reason I don't think football training is appropriate. If you want to bench big, or in this case bigger, training like a PLer seems to make more sense.That's why a six week peaking schedule like ateamer recommended is a good thing. I think as a PL competitor he knows how to peak for a meet or in this case a test.

I think it is possible to overtrain in a six week period. Overtraining will be just as bad as undertraining.

I don't know how old you are, but if you are young, any plan will work for most. As you age,it's tougher to make gains and things like volume, intensity and frequency have to be regulated closely. Even for the short haul.

Jack

California Jack
08-31-2004, 20:49
Hammer,

(you can allow your hands to work outside the width of your shoulders)

I'm confused by this. Why, when barbell pressing can't you use a grip width that allows your hands to work outside of your shoulders? Why do you need a shoulder width or less hand spacing?

Jack

live-free-r-die
08-31-2004, 20:58
Originally posted by cellison1460
I just took my physical for LE job and passed everything fine except for the bench press. I have to do my body weight which is 165, I was able to do 135 easily. It is on some universal that is older than dirt. Can anyone give some suggestions on what a good workout might be, I have to go back on Oct 1.

Thanks,
C. L. Ellison

Sorry, I never answered your original question.

If you want to increase your 1 rep max bench you need to bench, heavy!

Here is a max bench plat that will get you there.

Set 1: 6 reps; use enough weight so you canít do 7 reps.
Set 2: 5 reps same as above
Set 3: 4 reps, same as set 1
Set 4: 3 reps, same as set 1
Set 5: 2 reps, same as set 1
Set 6: 1 rep max bench
Donít do any other chest work for 24-48 hours, then repeat, you can wait more than 48 hours if you are still sore. You can do some tricep work using a similar rep scheme. You are looking for strength not power or hypertrophy. Train for strength. In six weeks you should have no problem adding the 30lbs you need. I bet you can add 10lbs just by getting psyched up.
When you have to test donít forget to get warmed up. Cold muscles canít generate as much force.

Donít use the universal it wonít help fast enough.

PS Donít forget to use a spotter!

HammerG26
08-31-2004, 21:00
I was referring more to the ability to bring the elbows straight down (almost by your side), then push out at an angle , thus allowing the hands to be outside the shoulder without going vertical (and thus impinging the shoulder). This places the tricep at full stretch on the down portion, and allows for more complete extension. Does that make more sense?

California Jack
08-31-2004, 21:06
Hammer,

I don't know, I'll have to think about it. I'll let you Know if I need an even more remedial explanation.


Live Free-- I agree with a lot of things you've said. But I have a few points of contention with this post.

1) It seems you are suggesting a max effort every workout. For 12 or more worouts in a row. This is excessive, no? Seems like it is too hard on the CNS.

2) Not a big point, but I think power is important, or at least if I understand Louie Simmons it is. What am I missing?

Jack

ateamer
08-31-2004, 21:25
You can't max out on the same exercise for six weeks in a row without wiping out the central nervous system, as well as possibly getting hurt by letting proper form go. Louie recommends changing exercises every week or two.

For what our prospective officer needs to accomplish here, just do a down-and-dirty catchup program like I outlined. That should be sufficient to get the bench up to bodyweight for a single, and get him through the test.

Jack, by the way, I spoke with Louie today. He has so much information and is so willing to share it with everyone, it is amazing. In what other sport can any athlete, no matter what level, just call up the world's top coach and get advice for no other cost than getting in the gym and putting it to work?

live-free-r-die
08-31-2004, 23:26
Every workout is a max effort workout! J/K

I know what you are saying but the fact that he is only doing one exercise speeds recovery. Notice I didnít say anything about other exercises except for adding in triceps. It is because I am guessing he passed everything else and just needs to re-test for bench. 100% effort should go to that goal.

A normal hypertrophy workout just wonít cut it with only six weeks to make 30 lbs up. (IMHO)

Just so you donít think I am blowing smoke out my ass I have been a personal trainer and corrective exercise specialist for 6 years and have trained everyone from over weight women to Pro football and hockey players.

paccw
09-01-2004, 04:58
CAL.jack
Please stop posting your not helping just fighting .
I'm in my 30's and been lifting pain free for years.You only seem to want to talk everyone down so please leave this post to everyone with years of experience.
I could pass and bench test right now...so understand one thing I can get the job done and that is this mans bottome line.He neeeds the job an I am willing to help.Now let's get to getting and lift some weights ;)

California Jack
09-01-2004, 11:33
Pac,

I'm not sure how you infered that I'm talking people down. And in fact I am helping. When I see people suggest that jogging or biking will help a bench, or that 12 consecutive workouts with max efforts in the same movement is proper protocol, I AM helping when I suggest these thoughts are not accepted practice.

BTW, I have agreed with a lot of posters here, I'm not sure where you are coming from. Is it because I disagree with you in philosophy that football type training is more productive than PL type training for this situation?


Live Free,

I certainly agree that a hypertrophy type workout is needed. But 12 max efforts in a row, well, WOW.


Ateamer,

Yes, Louie's willingness to help all is simply amazing. You better be careful though, or you might end up living in Colombus.:cool:

Jack

paccw
09-01-2004, 15:36
Never used the word max
Heavy light heavy doesn not mean max.
And cardio is needed if you don't see it I'm sorry for you
And if you want me to take the test I'm more then willing. I will put my money were my mouth is.

California Jack
09-01-2004, 17:16
Paccw,

Again, you're inferring something I didn't say. Live-Free-or-Die was talking about max efforts every workout, I never implied that you said it.

I never said heavy-light-heavy meant max. And actually, when you said to failure, that is a max. It's not a 1 RM, but it is a max.

As far as cardio goes, I do not see that it is necessary to increase ones bench press. I think you said earlier in this thread that we are trying to get his bench up in six weeks, not giving him a lifelong plan. Are you implying that cardio is needed to increase ones bench?

As far as the test, I'm sure you could pass it. A bodyweight bench for an able-bodied man under 60 years old that has been training for more than 18 months is no big deal.

Jack

Katzbalger10
09-03-2004, 20:19
cellison1460,

I don't know how they run the test in OH, but here in CT they give you the choice of doing steps or all at once. I have always gone all at once and never had a problem, one press at full power. More of the people I've seen do this pass vrs. more failing when doing it in steps.
They also use push-ups per minute, instead of press when they want to.
Good luck and train well.

saint01
09-04-2004, 11:53
cellison1460:

do you feel as though you have gotten an answer to your question? Do you have an idea about what to do to accomplish your goals? I only ask because at this point it appears that people are just bickering.

I just want to make sure that you have gotten your question answered.

Jeff

norton
09-05-2004, 10:55
Originally posted by Matt19
I would even suggest that you add in the old fashioned pushup as well. It's an excellent exercise to toss in. You might even go so far as to have a day-once a week perhaps-in which you keep doing pushups (in sets) until you've hit 500. It's an idea which has worked well for me in the past.

Off topic but my son was a flyweight in highschool. He wanted to play varsity baseball but really needed to gain strength. He was a great contact hitter but just couldn't hit for power.
He had tried lifting weights in the past, but got into back problems.
He started doing push ups and sit ups in his room. It was amazing how much it helped him. He never really lifted weights.
I think it was Bo Jackson, the NFL MLB player who never lifted weights but relied on pushups, situps and isometric type exercises.

Ok back on topic.

California Jack
09-05-2004, 15:48
Herschel Walker

walangkatapat
09-10-2004, 19:53
cellison1460, How's the bench coming along?

Glock13
09-29-2004, 15:32
Originally posted by .264 magnum

However, lots of very powerful guys use wide grips.




Excellent point. The first mistake I see people making when benching is using a narrow grip. When you get to the bottom of the rep (when the bar is at you chest) your forearms should be approximately at a 90 degree angle with your upper arm. Visualize how you would get a wide chest when benching and think about it while you do the exercise. You will find you feel a lot more powerful with a wide grip. Good luck.

ProfMoriarty
10-02-2004, 12:53
If your goal is to push up more weight with little time for proper training, besides growing shorter arms :) you can use body mechanics and poor positioning to cheat up more weight:

1. Medium wide grip
2. Lower the bar to just below nipple level
3. Arch your back slightly

#3 not recommended for training. The above cheaters will just allow you to push up more more weight for your PT test.

cellison1460
10-14-2004, 06:38
Sorry I haven't replied, for what ever reason my email has been kicking all my emails to my junk box so I didn't know anyone was replying.

I have joined a new gym that is alot nicer than my old, everyone here is extremely willing to help. I have been getting a lot of help from a guy that used to train for body building. I am lifting harder now than I ever have, and more sore than I ever have been. I am working out five days a week, working a different set of muscles ever day. I stilled failed my test last week, I get one more chance and I know I will pass it then.

Thanks to everyone for all the help.

Just a side note, as I was typing this it came across the news that a marion county Sheriff's Deputy was shot near Delaware. If you will I'd like for eveyone to keep this Deputy and his family in their thoughts and prayers.

Thanks, C.L. Ellison

45acp4me
10-14-2004, 21:01
Will the department be upset if you start using creatine and protein suppliments? You will reach your goal quicker if you use creatine and take in 40 to 60 grams of whey protien follwed up by good meals after your workouts. My bench went up by 10 lbs. just by loading up on creatine, it works and will give you quicker results.

Regards,
Glen

cellison1460
11-10-2004, 15:57
Just to post an update, I went back to Columbus on Monday (11-8-04) to retake my physical. I passed everything with flying colors. My bench was super easy I benched 185 on their machine, and did my 1.5 mile run in 12min and 49 seconds. Thanks everyone for their help, it looks like I should start the academy on 12-01-04.

I just need to work on my running a litle bit more, I have been getting bad cramps in my calves and hamstrings when I run.

Thanks everyone,
C.L. Ellison

45acp4me
11-10-2004, 16:37
Originally posted by cellison1460
Just to post an update, I went back to Columbus on Monday (11-8-04) to retake my physical. I passed everything with flying colors. My bench was super easy I benched 185 on their machine, and did my 1.5 mile run in 12min and 49 seconds. Thanks everyone for their help, it looks like I should start the academy on 12-01-04.

I just need to work on my running a litle bit more, I have been getting bad cramps in my calves and hamstrings when I run.

Thanks everyone,
C.L. Ellison

Congrats!

A bit of warm up stretching and lots of after stretching will keep the cramps at bay.

Good luck at the academy!
Glen

California Jack
11-10-2004, 20:00
Way to go Cellison! Glad to hear the hard work paid off.^c ^c

paccw
11-11-2004, 19:42
Running;P
Can't you just run them down with the car...after all your going to be a police officer;)