Do looks play a role in elections? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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NRA_guy
11-06-2004, 14:17
Please forgive me for intruding into your forum, but I have a serious question for you ladies:

In elections like the one we just had, do you think that women tend to vote for cute guys?

Before you label me a sexist, let me confess that I probably am---but a somewhat open minded one. And also I confess that most guys tend to vote for attractive women. Heck, we forgive pretty women over and over and over again for whatever they do, but the unattractive ones, well they only get one chance---at most.

For example, Hillary's appearance (and her raving liberalism) is a major turn-off to many guys. That is one of the most frequent comments I hear guys make about her.

And I suspect that John Kerry's long, sad face was a turn-off (or at least not a turn-on) for many women voters.

Not that GW Bush is a prince, but he has a certain huggable, cute air about him.

I sort of got the impression from my wife, and other women I know, that Bill Clinton's cute looks got him lots of votes and major forgiveness. John Kennedy had the same quality.

Of course, we've elected some really ugly guys too, like Nixon.

But in a close race, with everything else being about equal, do you think looks plays a role?

Political pundits are searching for explanations for the vote count. Could part of the difference just be in the candidates' appearance?

NRA_guy

Vic303
11-06-2004, 14:31
Politicians looks do not matter to me.

NRA_guy
11-06-2004, 15:04
Thanks.

Glad to hear that.

NRA_guy

MrsKitty
11-06-2004, 15:30
Originally posted by Vic303
Politicians looks do not matter to me.

Nor to me ;)

c-mama
11-06-2004, 18:22
Looks do not matter to me in a candidate.

I vote strictly on issues.

---

edited: Although looks don't matter, I think W. is a cutie and he and Laura make a great looking couple. ;)

NRA_guy
11-06-2004, 19:10
Hmmm. I believe we have a concensus here: Takes more than a pretty face to get your vote.

Now, do you all think that you Glock Talk ladies are typical in this respect? I.e., would the average female voter feel the same way?

I realize that I am asking you to generalize, but I am just wondering what you think.

I find that all on Glock Talk (both the men and the ladies) are pretty astute---particularly politically. They seem to stay on top of situations and they seem to be able to draw logical conclusions. I like that in a person. Not sure it's typical of the whole population.

Thanks for all the feedback.

NRA_guy

MrsKitty
11-06-2004, 23:14
Actually, I think that every single female I know votes straight ticket because that is what thier daddy or husband said to do ;g

Jaegergirl
11-07-2004, 08:51
definately issues are more important than looks.

most of the women i know vote based on issues as well rather than looks. but, a lot of women i know (other than family members and women that go to my church) base their vote on what they "learn" from the media. ;Q

NRA_guy
11-07-2004, 11:04
Originally posted by misskitty5077
Actually, I think that every single female I know votes straight ticket because that is what thier daddy or husband said to do ;g My wife always votes just the opposite of whatever I suggest. She's a liberal.

So several years ago I began either staying silent or encouraging her to vote for the liberals.

I think she's on to me though: lately she is starting to just ignore my advice. :(

Thanks again.

NRA_guy

c-mama
11-07-2004, 11:29
Originally posted by NRA_guy


Now, do you all think that you Glock Talk ladies are typical in this respect? I.e., would the average female voter feel the same way?



I'm hoping that the average female voter would vote issues. But, I'm sure there are those who vote by looks.

And what Miss Kitty says is true as well.

Kolchak
11-07-2004, 19:17
I think it is possible that the women of GlockTalk as well as other shooting boards may be a little better informed about some of the issues due to the relationship we have with firearms.

It would pain me to think that a lot of women are swayed by looks, as it would hurt to think that a lot of men would change their vote for that reason. But, I'm sure there are some of both.

Tell me honestly, though, if you knew for sure that a woman that looked like Hillary was going to support gun owners to the death, but a guy that looked like John Wayne was going to take them away as sure as he stood there, pilgrim, wouldn't you vote for the Hillary lookalike?

I would like to think that looks were not an issue.

NRA_guy
11-08-2004, 06:36
Originally posted by Kolchak
Tell me honestly, though, if you knew for sure that a woman that looked like Hillary was going to support gun owners to the death, but a guy that looked like John Wayne was going to take them away as sure as he stood there, pilgrim, wouldn't you vote for the Hillary lookalike? Absolutely.

But in a close election (i.e., one in which I was one of the "undecided" masses) if they had equally conservative positions, I would probably vote for Ann Coulter over Bill O'Reilly.

PS: I agree that Glock Talkers are atypical.

NRA_guy

gypsyroverco
11-09-2004, 09:02
I think women are probably more aware of a candidate's attractiveness (or lack thereof)--but it's probably due to the fact that at the more publicized levels, candidates tend to be male. I know that I can recognize that someone may have a "cute huggable air" but that doesn't neccessarily boil down to getting my punch in the voting booth. That may be the important distinction to make.

Same way that recognizing the undeniable appeal of Bret Farve doesn't make me a Packers fan....

gypsy

Melissa Ann
11-09-2004, 10:13
I vote my conscience, as do my mom and my sisters. I like to think that women would vote vased on the issues, not looks. Although, I have to admit, that if Bush and Kerry had similar takes on all the issues, I'd vote for Bush because Kerry looks like a slimy snake. He's got a look that says "I'm untrustworthy" to him. I thought that the very first time I saw him.

So I guess, in a close election, where both candidates have similar stands on the issues, say two fellas were rallying to be on the Republican ticket, I would go with looks to a point - some people look more honest than others. Of course it's not a very reliable way to vote - Ted Bundy was a pretty hunky-looking fellow. ;Q

But, if it's close and the difference is Kerry and Bush in THIS election, where their stands on the issues were like night and day, I'd vote completely based on the issues.

forthehalibut
11-11-2004, 21:49
This is what the elite media referred to as the "arousal gap." It was a major reason in both of Clinton's victories.

Men do it to. They thought Kerry won the first debate if they saw it on tv, but ovewhelmingly [men and women] though Bush won it if they listened to it on the radio.