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frefoo
12-04-2004, 23:58
I spent 4 years in USAF (2x331b) and have honorable discharge hanging on my wall.

That being said my 4 years can not compare to people that give their whole life protecting this country.

I generally reserve "Veteran Status" to people that have served for much longer then my 4 short years.

My question is as follows...

Does serving 4 years qualify you as a Veteran?

Thanks

Dave

AKJD
12-05-2004, 06:57
frefoo,
Yes you are a veteran and don't let anyone tell you otherwise. Thank you for your service.

JD.

skyboss_4evr
12-05-2004, 16:21
Damn right you're a veteran! Be proud of it!

jwalk2515
12-05-2004, 21:40
Yes you are and Thanks!

CarlosDJackal
12-05-2004, 21:40
Damn right!! ^c

GRIZZLYBEAR
12-06-2004, 05:57
I was drafted in '63 and spent less than 4 years on active duty with time in a hostile environment. Yes, I consider myself a VET and you sir are a VET also.

grizz

erikd65
12-06-2004, 23:33
I am retired Air Force and I consider just as much a vet as I am. :)

RenegadeGlocker
12-06-2004, 23:53
Originally posted by frefoo


Does serving 4 years qualify you as a Veteran?



Qualify for what?

To get 5 points under Civil Service, you need to be in 3 years.

To join American Legion requires 1 day during a listed campaign.

To join VFW requires service in a CZ.

etc.

Here is a chart for campaigns:

Veteran is a person who holds an honorable discharge from active military or naval service of the United States and who served during the time periods shown in the chart below:

WAR ERA SERVICE DATES
World War II September 16, 1940 to December 31, 1946
Korean Conflict June 23, 1950 to January 31, 1955
Lebanon Crisis July 1, 1958 to November 1, 1958
Vietnam Conflict December 31, 1960 to May 7, 1975
Lebanon Peacekeeping Mission September 26, 1982 to December 1, 1987
Grenada Peacekeeping Mission October 23, 1983 to November 21, 1983
Panama Peacekeeping Mission December 20, 1989 to January 31, 1990
Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm August 2, 1990 to the present
Operation Restore Hope in Somalia December 5, 1992 to March 31, 1994
Operations Joint Endeavor/Joint Guard-Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina November 20, 1995 to present
Operation Enduring Freedom September 11, 2001 to present
Operation Iraqi Freedom March 23, 2003 to present

Glocks&Ducs
01-04-2005, 19:19
I know this is an old thread but I am interested where you got your information from RenegadeGlocker.


Are you really claiming that unless you served in one of these campaigns and you received an honorable discharge you are not a veteran?

I participated in United Shield 19950208 to 199950306(Somalia) as per my DD214. Does this mean I am not a veteran since it is not on your list?

I hope Illinois doesn't find out I am not a veteran after almost twelve years of service because the state is about to pay for my education as per the Illinois Veterans Grant.

jwalk2515
01-04-2005, 19:42
Originally posted by Glocks&Ducs
I know this is an old thread but I am interested where you got your information from RenegadeGlocker.

Are you really claiming that unless you served in one of these campaigns and you received an honorable discharge you are not a veteran?


Glocks&Ducs, I think the campaigns listed were specifically aimed at the line above. Those campaigns are the requirements for membership into the VFW, not to be a veteran.

I don't think he was demaning your service at all, you were a vet 1 day after boot camp and at discharge. You earned those benies, use with pride. I know I am using mine. The University of North Texas is happy to take my government money.

Glocks&Ducs
01-04-2005, 19:54
jwalk

I was not and am not offended by renegades post. I simply meant to point out that based on his reply the definition of a veteran is incorrect. If it is true that his list only encompassed the requirements for joining the VFW, he is still incorrect. The campaign I listed is included in the official VFW webpage. It is not on his list.

I was just a little surprised that the last post was renegades and it seemed to imply that freefoo and many of the other posters were not veterans.

RoyG
01-04-2005, 20:00
For the VFW check here (http://www.vfw.org/pdf/eligibility.pdf).

FLIPPER 348
01-04-2005, 20:42
Originally posted by Glocks&Ducs



Are you really claiming that unless you served in one of these campaigns and you received an honorable discharge you are not a veteran?



No, he is posting info on the VFW requirements.

RenegadeGlocker
01-04-2005, 21:11
Originally posted by Glocks&Ducs
Are you really claiming that unless you served in one of these campaigns and you received an honorable discharge you are not a veteran?

As I said before "Qualify for what?" Different groups have different requirements. VFW, Civil Service, VA benefits, all have different requirements to determine eligibility.

I make no claims, it is not my list, I just provided the info I found on the web. That is a list of common campaigns to which veteran status is recognized. If you have questions about your legal veteran status, you should call the VA.

RussP
01-04-2005, 23:03
Originally posted by frefoo
I spent 4 years in USAF (2x331b) and have honorable discharge hanging on my wall.

That being said my 4 years can not compare to people that give their whole life protecting this country.

I generally reserve "Veteran Status" to people that have served for much longer then my 4 short years.

My question is as follows...

Does serving 4 years qualify you as a Veteran?

Thanks

Dave Yes.

cadillacguns
01-05-2005, 10:40
Don't need to rifle any feathers. Officialy a Veteran is an individual who spent at leat 180 days on active duty. "I" think anyone who serves their country to be a Veteran, however,some Guard and Reserve members (All veterans in my book) have only basic and advanced training not totaling six months of "Active" Duty)

According to the department of Veterans Affairs they do not qualify then as Veterans until they do.



Example George Bush was a Guard Pilot, BUT, he spent more than a year in training.............Veterans status, but some one who went to a 2 mo basic and 2 mo tech school only spends 120 days, and until re activated their time in the guard/reserves doesnt count to veterans status. ****ty rules I agree, but thats the law. Don't believe me call 1-800-827-1000 and ask the VA.

wade farley
01-05-2005, 13:06
:cool: Even if someone was lucky enough, to not have to serve in a hostile enviroment. Just by being in the Armed Forces, you knew the possibility was always there, as long as you wore the uniform. Thanks for your service! ;f

dispatcher
01-08-2005, 09:15
Of course it does.....I did 2 years drafted and Im a vet my son is doing his last 6 mths in the Marines and he also is a vet...

Sgt. Schultz
01-20-2005, 22:59
Originally posted by cadillacguns
Officialy a Veteran is an individual who spent at least 180 days on active duty.

... as long as their discharge was not a Dishonorable Discharge, Bad-Conduct Discharge or under Other Than Honorable Conditions.

Glocks&Ducs
01-21-2005, 01:53
Originally posted by Sgt. Schultz
... as long as their discharge was not a Dishonorable Discharge, Bad-Conduct Discharge or under Other Than Honorable Conditions.

Are you sure about that? If I am not mistaken, you are still a veteran, you just don't rate many of the benefits that an honorably discharged veteran does. Did you know that if you get kicked out for doing drugs after your first enlistment you can still use your GI bill?

Sgt. Schultz
01-21-2005, 06:45
I know a person that was convicted of a crime, did his time, was striped of his rank and all privileges and received a dishonorable discharge. When he applied for Veterans benefits he was informed that because of his conviction and dishonorable discharge that he was not considered a veteran nor entitled to benefits. I know this to be true because unfortunately it’s a member of my family.


I see no reason why a person couldn't use the GI Bill ... it's his money.

Glocks&Ducs
01-21-2005, 09:24
Actually it isn't his money, not all of it.

He only put $1200 into the system and he is supposed to get back many more thousands in return for going to school. One of the stipulations to take full advantage of it, is that the member have an honorable discharge. Every time a person reenlists they are discharged and reenlisted the next day. So, let's say someone gets in trouble the day after he re-enlisted and winds up gettiing kicked out. He still has an honorable discharge so he can use the entire GI Bill.

If they get kicked out prior to getting an honorable discharge for the first time, they only rate a certain amount of months. Something like one month for every month he served past three years. I am not sure if it three years but it is something like that.

Aside from the GI BIll, you are right, he does not rate any benefits due to dishonorable discharge. I think it is pretty bad. When I was getting out there were a couple of kids getting kicked out for smoking marijuana and they were not even getting money to get back home. I would think they could at least send the kids back home.

HotDesertMama
02-16-2005, 22:52
One of my fellow veterans just sent me this.

WHAT IS A VETERAN?

Some veterans bear visible signs of their service: a missing limb, a jagged scar, a certain look in their eyes.

Others may carry the evidence inside them: a pin holding a bone together, a piece of shrapnel in the leg - or perhaps another sort of inner steel: the soul's ally forged in the refinery of adversity.

Except in the parades, however, the men and women who have kept America safe wear no badge or emblem.

You can't tell a vet just by looking.

What is a vet?

He is the cop on the beat who spent six months in Saudi Arabia sweating two gallons a day making sure the armored personnel carriers didn't run out of fuel.

He is the barroom loudmouth, dumber than five wooden planks, whose
overgrown frat-boy behavior is out weighed a hundred times in the cosmic scales by four hours of exquisite bravery near the 38th parallel.

She - or he - is the nurse who fought against futility and went to sleep sobbing every night for two solid years in Da Nang.

He is the POW who went away one person and came back another - or
didn't come back AT ALL.

He is the Quantico Drill Instructor who has never seen combat - but has saved countless lives by turning slouchy, no-account gang members, hoodlums and others into Marines, and teaching them to watch each other's backs.
He is the parade - riding Legionnaire who pins on his ribbons and medals with a prosthetic hand.

He is the career quartermaster who watches the ribbons and medals pass
him by.

He is the three anonymous heroes in The Tomb Of The Unknowns, whose
presence at the Arlington National Cemetery must forever preserve the
memory of all the anonymous heroes whose valor dies unrecognized with them on the battlefield or in the ocean's sunless deep.

He is the old guy bagging groceries at the supermarket - palsied now and aggravatingly slow - who helped liberate a Nazi death camp and who wishes all day long that his wife were still alive to hold him when the nightmares come.

He is an ordinary and yet an extraordinary human being - a person who
offered some of his life's most vital years in the service of
his country, and who sacrificed his ambition so others would not have sacrificed theirs.

He is a soldier and a savior and a sword against the darkness, and he is nothing more than the finest, greatest testimony on behalf of the
finest, greatest nation ever known.

So remember, each time you see someone who has served our country, just lean over and say Thank You. That's all most people need, and in most cases it will mean more than any medals they could have been awarded or were awarded.

Two little words that mean a lot, "THANK YOU". Thank you, each and every one of you, regardless of length of commitment or experiences, your sacrifices are immeasurable and immensely appreciated.

;? ;? ;? ;? ;? ;? ;? ;? ;? ;?

LBTRS
02-17-2005, 02:03
Originally posted by erikd65
I am retired Air Force and I consider just as much a vet as I am. :)

But it was the Air Force so that only counts as half a Vet. ;)

Just kiddin' you guys, thanks for your service from this Navy Chief. To answer the first guy...of course you're a Vet.

TommyJ
02-17-2005, 12:48
Very well said and deeply felt. Thank you!!! TJ

Squid.HM2
02-17-2005, 19:26
frefoo you and anyone else who served are be Proud ;?

HotDesertMama
02-17-2005, 23:22
Originally posted by Tom Johnson
Very well said and deeply felt. Thank you!!! TJ

I am not sure where it came from or who wrote it, but this is one of my all time favorite quotes. I wanted to make it my signature, but it was too long! :)

"It is the soldier, not the reporter, Who has given us freedom of the
press.

It is the soldier, not the poet, Who has given us the freedom of speech.

It is the soldier, not the campus organizer, Who has given us the freedom to demonstrate.

It is the soldier, Who salutes the flag, Who serves beneath the flag, and whose coffin is draped by the flag, Who allows the protester to burn the flag."

TKennedy1975
02-18-2005, 19:00
Charles M. Province
:cool: ;?

jerrytrini
02-21-2005, 09:49
He is the one on the street corner asking for some loose change for a cup of coffee..

I served for 20 years......

Grom the paunch
02-22-2005, 17:56
I know how you feel FEFRO

reconvic
03-06-2005, 10:38
I am a retired Marine.Joined at 17 and was in for 25 years.
RVN 68-70 with 2/5 1st tour and 1st Recon Battalion second.
In states became a hand to hand instructor.http://www.hunt101.com/img/260238.gif

Frenchy
03-07-2005, 18:25
You are a Vet...Whether it was 4 years of stateside duty, or service in a foreign war. It's luck of the draw.

king catfish
03-12-2005, 16:22
Holy Moly, I broke up reading that.
10th MTN Div.

HHC 2-22 Heavy Weapons Platoon
Somalia 92 - 93
Haiti 93 - 94

And yes, you ARE a vet.


Originally posted by HotDesertMama
One of my fellow veterans just sent me this.

WHAT IS A VETERAN?

Some veterans bear visible signs of their service: a missing limb, a jagged scar, a certain look in their eyes.

Others may carry the evidence inside them: a pin holding a bone together, a piece of shrapnel in the leg - or perhaps another sort of inner steel: the soul's ally forged in the refinery of adversity.

Except in the parades, however, the men and women who have kept America safe wear no badge or emblem.

You can't tell a vet just by looking.

What is a vet?

He is the cop on the beat who spent six months in Saudi Arabia sweating two gallons a day making sure the armored personnel carriers didn't run out of fuel.

He is the barroom loudmouth, dumber than five wooden planks, whose
overgrown frat-boy behavior is out weighed a hundred times in the cosmic scales by four hours of exquisite bravery near the 38th parallel.

She - or he - is the nurse who fought against futility and went to sleep sobbing every night for two solid years in Da Nang.

He is the POW who went away one person and came back another - or
didn't come back AT ALL.

He is the Quantico Drill Instructor who has never seen combat - but has saved countless lives by turning slouchy, no-account gang members, hoodlums and others into Marines, and teaching them to watch each other's backs.
He is the parade - riding Legionnaire who pins on his ribbons and medals with a prosthetic hand.

He is the career quartermaster who watches the ribbons and medals pass
him by.

He is the three anonymous heroes in The Tomb Of The Unknowns, whose
presence at the Arlington National Cemetery must forever preserve the
memory of all the anonymous heroes whose valor dies unrecognized with them on the battlefield or in the ocean's sunless deep.

He is the old guy bagging groceries at the supermarket - palsied now and aggravatingly slow - who helped liberate a Nazi death camp and who wishes all day long that his wife were still alive to hold him when the nightmares come.

He is an ordinary and yet an extraordinary human being - a person who
offered some of his life's most vital years in the service of
his country, and who sacrificed his ambition so others would not have sacrificed theirs.

He is a soldier and a savior and a sword against the darkness, and he is nothing more than the finest, greatest testimony on behalf of the
finest, greatest nation ever known.

So remember, each time you see someone who has served our country, just lean over and say Thank You. That's all most people need, and in most cases it will mean more than any medals they could have been awarded or were awarded.

Two little words that mean a lot, "THANK YOU". Thank you, each and every one of you, regardless of length of commitment or experiences, your sacrifices are immeasurable and immensely appreciated.

;? ;? ;? ;? ;? ;? ;? ;? ;? ;?

frefoo
03-19-2005, 19:29
Originally posted by RenegadeGlocker
Qualify for what?

I want to "qualify" for the respect of my peers. Those that have sacrificed more then my 4 years and went through harder times then I did.

I do meet the requirements under the campaigns you listed (I was in Saudi/Kohbar Towers in 1996) and other dates.

Thanks to all the people/Vets that replied. I am at a loss of words that I have been accepted into your "club".

KIDCOP
03-20-2005, 22:56
Originally posted by LBTRS
But it was the Air Force so that only counts as half a Vet. ;)

Just kiddin' you guys, thanks for your service from this Navy Chief. To answer the first guy...of course you're a Vet.

My thoughts exactly. ;)

outlaws161
03-20-2005, 23:03
As far as I am concerned if you took the oath to serve and protect this country and have fulfilled it then you are a veteran to me and that all to it!!!!;f