What are your "Required Tools"? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Sinister Angel
12-23-2004, 19:22
As I was reading about someone talking about a pen drive on another forum, I grabbed one that I had (128 meg), but never really used it. I was thinking "Hey, I should throw all the things I generally need on here". Such things so far are putty,psftp,netcat,realvnc viewer, and vim. For those of you who like to have a set of tools at their disposal wherever you are, what do you like to have?

hwyhobo
12-23-2004, 19:54
I take it you are talking about tools for Windows. In that case, add to your list (good selection, btw):

1. Ethereal
2. Elvis (vi clone)
3. Irfanview
4. mirc
5. YIM

Also, if there is room left, I would like to have full versions of the following as well:

6. Firefox
7. GIMP

All 7 of the above are in my single-click loading dock.

Sinister Angel
12-24-2004, 02:36
Hmm, I've never used Elvis (heard of it, but never used it), what advantages or just differences does it have from Vim? Ethereal is a good one as well. Haven't used it alot, but for general fun, it can be a good one ;) I actually like xchat for whatever reason. mIRC isn't bad, I just seem to like xchat a bit better, although you have to pay for future versions, 2.4.0 is free.

Is there a way to dump mozilla or firefox on there w/o inserting all the registry stuff so you just have it? Same with gimp?

Sinister Angel
12-24-2004, 03:28
Well, this works for firefox..

http://johnhaller.com/jh/mozilla/portable_firefox/

hwyhobo
12-24-2004, 11:38
Heh, I was just going to suggest portable Firefox, but it's too late. :)

I have no idea if you can make Gimp portable. I haven't found a way yet, but I haven't looked very hard.

Vim is more "full-featured" and is bigger. For some reason it never clicked with me on UNIX/Linux, and so I didn't even look for it on Windows. It always smacked me a bit of bloatware (I better duck now). ;a

Seriously, vim for Windows? Hm. I'll look for it and will test it. As for Ethereal, I use it all the time. It's invaluable since it reads standard .dmp files. The only thing is you have to install packet drivers first if you want to decode live traffic (it will read saved traces without packet drivers). Therefore, you cannot make it truly portable for live trace.

xchat I like as well. To be honest, either xchat or mirc would work for me on that list. I use xchat on Linux.

One more item I thought of later is a pdf reader. I've seen machines without one, and there seems to be a trend to produce more and more documentation in that format.

Sinister Angel
12-24-2004, 12:47
I was looking and for the time being, it looks like gimp might be a no go. Same with ethereal due to the fact of the drivers (GTK+ for gimp, winpcap for ethereal) needing to be installed, which sucks, because gimp would be a nice little package to have mobile. Maybe when I get the time to try and learn C again, I'll figure out how to staticly compile in GTK+ ;f

A PDF reader is also a good idea. Better save than sorry.

As for vim, I like the text hilighting features. Actually, there are also alot of addons that people make for it as well. For example, someone made a nice little plugin for LaTeX that is rather nice.

BLiTzNicK
12-25-2004, 23:47
The contents of my little 64 meg flash key should give you a pretty good idea of my average day:

1. AdAware
2. Spybot
3. Stinger
4. Various Password Recovery Tools
5. Restoration
6. McAfee
7. WinRar
8. WinZip
9. Various Boot Disks
10. Virus Cleanup tools for specific purposes
11. LanFind

I keep all the "good stuff" on my laptop.

Sinister Angel
01-12-2005, 10:23
I also threw a hex editor on the thing ;f

David_G17
01-12-2005, 10:44
here's an idea:
Home on the USB key

For many applications, a writeable home directory takes a live Linux distribution from oddity to seriously useful. And the most convenient format for carrying around data is on USB memory key, offering a good combination of size, performance and durability.

Over the last few years keyring-sized USB keys of reasonable capacity have become cheap, with 256MB keys available for around 50.

Several of the distributions featured here include simple mechanisms for setting up a home directory on a USB key, and instructions for using that directory when booting the OS. Since the distribution itself is inherently read-only this involves manually appending an option at boot time, but it's a small price to pay for the added convenience.

You don't need to devote your key to act solely as a Linux home directory - you can create an image file which, like a mini ISO image, contains your home directory and all the files in it. Then all you need is a generic copy of your chosen live distribution to boot into your preferred environment.

If your system supports booting from USB you can go one step further and install the whole operating system on a USB key. Of course that takes a lot more space, and does mean using your key just as bootable Linux device. But if you have a 512MB or 1GB key it's possible to cram on a full-size distribution with a full suite of office applications. Try that with Windows.

this is awesome http://www.damnsmalllinux.org/dsl-0.9.2.jpg

SKeefe
02-08-2005, 14:45
For you guys who keep antivirus/spyware removal tools on your USB drive, do you actually install the application on the USB drive or simply keep the install executable on there?

If you do actually install the app on the drive, how do you keep the definitons current?

I was reading on some other places where people were saying they kept spyware tools and such on their USB drives along with the "latest definitions" and I couldn't figure out how to do it.

I can't even get some applications such as AVG to install to anything other than a local disk, much less keep the definitons current.

HerrGlock
02-08-2005, 14:50
Bootable forensics disk with coronor's toolkit and other fun stuff. ;j

DanH

pyblood
02-08-2005, 15:37
Originally posted by SKeefe
For you guys who keep antivirus/spyware removal tools on your USB drive, do you actually install the application on the USB drive or simply keep the install executable on there?

If you do actually install the app on the drive, how do you keep the definitons current?

I was reading on some other places where people were saying they kept spyware tools and such on their USB drives along with the "latest definitions" and I couldn't figure out how to do it.

I can't even get some applications such as AVG to install to anything other than a local disk, much less keep the definitons current.

If you go to most anti-virus software website, you can download a copy of their latest defs.
Here's Lavasoft's Def page (http://lavasoft.element5.com/support/download/) and Norton's Page (http://securityresponse.symantec.com/avcenter/download/pages/US-N95.html)

With AVG, you can download the EXE (I think it's less than 10 megs) and the defs. All you have to do is tell AVG where the defs are localed on the local disc, and it will do the rest. A lot of times when I try to tell AVG to download the defs, it usually fails, so I just go to their webpage, download the defs, and tell AVG where they are.

Personally, I have a utilities CD with my most commonly used apps like AVG (with defs), Ad-aware (with defs), Spybot, Adobe reader, Winzip, Open Office, Everst, Windows media player, etc.

rotinom
02-09-2005, 14:24
I'd add the following:
1.) Subversion repository
2.) KeepPass

Subversion is version control software. I keep a local repository of code, files, etc.. for when I need them. Not totally portable, but nice to have & move back and forth.

KeepPass is a password manager. Strongly encrypts & manages passwords. That way, you can have several strong passwords, stored & maanaged by a single password. If you hotmail pw is broken, your bank pw is still valid.

My $0.02

Sinister Angel
02-09-2005, 17:28
Originally posted by rotinom
I'd add the following:
1.) Subversion repository
2.) KeepPass

Subversion is version control software. I keep a local repository of code, files, etc.. for when I need them. Not totally portable, but nice to have & move back and forth.

KeepPass is a password manager. Strongly encrypts & manages passwords. That way, you can have several strong passwords, stored & maanaged by a single password. If you hotmail pw is broken, your bank pw is still valid.

My $0.02

Actually, it's funny you mention Subversion. My local LUG had a presentation about setting it up and using it last Tuesday (the 1<sup>st</sup>). Prior to that, I never played with version control before, but it doesn't seem that hard now that I saw it done first hand.

fatlander
02-11-2005, 07:50
super utilities
notepad2

Wingnut357
02-17-2005, 16:58
OS X kit.

Firefox.
Airstumbler.
Azureus. (You never know)
Cyanide.
Camino.
VLC Player.
IE.
Thunderbird.
WMPlayer. (sometimes)

greenlead
02-17-2005, 19:29
Try Dyne:bolic (http://www.dynebolic.org).

It is a multimedia-oriented live Linux CD distro, but it is full of most or all of the apps you folks listed.