Questions on programming languages ... [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Vince
01-03-2005, 05:54
Hello,

A year ago, I started learning VBA and have used it in MS Outlook and Excel, along with a couple of other non-MS products. As a manufacturing engineer at a chemical company, it has been very beneficial to use. I really enjoy programming and want to do more of it. Thinking it was the next logical thing to learn, I just started learning VB.NET. I see, though, that there are a lot of alternate languages and also have since seen Linux in use, and was impressed.

I'm wondering, though, what programming language can be most broadly used? Is VB.NET only usable with Windows? Is there a VB equivalent in the Linux world? At this point, I'm wondering if learning VB.NET is the smartest thing to do, or should I spend my time and money learning a different language?

Thanks,

Toyman
01-03-2005, 07:58
There are many languages used on Windows, like C, C++, C#, Dephi, Python, etc.

C and C++ can probably be most broadly used. VB is just for Windows. Delphi can cross compile to run on Linux. Delphi now is also .net, but I haven't gotten into that yet.

I currently code in Delphi, but I used to be a VB guy. If you want to work in the corporate world, your best bet is to stay in the VB.net / c# world.

I personally like Delphi because it's very GUI like VB, but is faster and doesn't require runtimes. It's also much better for inheritance stuff. It's not that much different from VB language wise.

Sinister Angel
01-03-2005, 09:28
I'm gonna have to say C or C++, or both if yer up to it.

I'd also recommend getting some Perl knowledge under your belt.

vote Republican
01-03-2005, 13:06
Depends what you're coding for. Java is also good for cross platform.

Melete
01-03-2005, 13:20
If you want a good general purpose, cross platform language, learn Java. A lot of what you learn there will apply to the .NET languages.

If you're serious about learning linux programming, learn perl if you want to do scripting tasks, or C and then C++ if you want to write high-performance programs.

For website programming, learn PHP. It's an awesome language.

SamBuca
01-03-2005, 16:26
I live and breathe PHP. If I could figure out the ROM routines for my microwave, I'd reprogram it with a PHP interpreter.

PHP is capable of so much more than "web stuff." Put a CGI copy on your server and use it for shell tasks.

PHP is ultimate solution for any task because it's operating system independent--PHP, the webserver and the database program will run on any OS, but the actual end user sees it through a web browser. Who doesn't have a web browser on EVERY platform? You could have 1 client workstation or 500 and all the machine has to do is run a web browser.

Sinister Angel
01-03-2005, 16:43
Originally posted by SamBuca
I live and breathe PHP. If I could figure out the ROM routines for my microwave, I'd reprogram it with a PHP interpreter.

PHP is capable of so much more than "web stuff." Put a CGI copy on your server and use it for shell tasks.

PHP is ultimate solution for any task because it's operating system independent--PHP, the webserver and the database program will run on any OS, but the actual end user sees it through a web browser. Who doesn't have a web browser on EVERY platform? You could have 1 client workstation or 500 and all the machine has to do is run a web browser. ^6

Vince
01-03-2005, 18:21
Thanks for the replies and great information!!!

Based on what I've read here, I think I'll first continue on learning VB.NET. I've went through a beginners book in VB.NET already and have purchased a more advanced one to go through next. Once I feel I can do most everything I want in VB.NET, I'm going to learn PHP. The recommendations for PHP were pretty impressive.

A couple of questions on PHP, though. How does a person get the software for PHP? Where is it bought or downloaded? Also, are books the best way to learn the language, or can tuturials from the web be used? If books, can anyone recommend a winner? If web sites, can someone post a link to a good site?

Thank you,

bobby_w
01-03-2005, 19:22
For PHP...

http://www.php.net and then get www.mysql.com

or

Go here and download XAMMP for the particular platform you run. Everything is in the bundle and it works great. And its free.

>>> Apache Friends.... (http://www.apachefriends.org/en/xampp.html)

SamBuca
01-03-2005, 19:58
How does a person get the software for PHP? Where is it bought or downloaded?

As bobby said, php.net. It's free. As in, you pay nothing. Ever. Yes...one of the most powerful and versatile things on the planet is FREE. Welcome to open source :)

Also, are books the best way to learn the language, or can tuturials from the web be used? If books, can anyone recommend a winner? If web sites, can someone post a link to a good site?

I've looked through all the PHP books in the store....99% of them are junk. They teach outdated concepts and a lot of the examples are incorrect. Maybe it's because I'm not a book learner, but I thought they were all nonsense and a waste.

The online documentation on php.net is VERY good for code examples. PHPBuilder.com is also a good resource. We even have a magazine: phparch.com.

Get something that you already understand (like a web board system) and learn from that code. Make modifications. Within a month you'll be doing your own stuff from scratch.

NetNinja
01-03-2005, 20:21
I am not a programer but I have friends who are.

I have a friend who absolutely loves Delphi.

He also programs in PHP.

Also C seems to be pretty popular with my buddies.


If you mention Java you might get shot. They absolutely hate that language with a passion. But it is very popular with developers.

But since these dudes that I hang out with are at the machine level they can tell you stuff that will make your head hurt.

As a Network Admin I hate any application that is programmed in that language.

Anything that is programed in Java seems to be slow bloated POS, resourse eating pig.

Vince
01-03-2005, 21:29
Thank you for the links! I went to the sites and am just amazed at the content and the amount of help they provide new learners. It is a totally different environment than when I was trying to learn a Microsoft language for the first time. I will try to download XAMMP tomorrow and give the tutorials a whirl.

Right now, I run Windows. This last weekend, a friend showed me an old machine he had Linux installed on and I was impressed. He says Linux is totally virus safe, unlike Windows. Is this true? Since I've been using Windows for years, I'm a little nervous about switching completely over to Linux, but imagine I'll do it soon after I learn more and get a little more comfortable.

I sure appreciate all the input given to me in this thread. I feel a heck of a lot more confident in what I want to learn than I did before. I'm even excited to learn PHP now!

Thanks again,

Vince

SamBuca
01-03-2005, 21:51
There are viruses in Linux...but Linux operates so different from Windows that it's comparing apples and oranges.

Attached is a screenshot of my desktop. Gentoo Linux:

Linux dexter 2.6.9-gentoo-r13 #4 Wed Dec 29 10:39:10 EST 2004 i686 AMD Athlon(tm) Processor AuthenticAMD GNU/Linux

Mozilla/5.0 (X11; U; Linux i686; en-US; rv:1.7.5) Gecko/20041228 Firefox/1.0

Gnome 2.8.1 with MetaXP+Noia+Glossy P

CPU is pegged at 100% because I'm running FoldingAtHome (http://folding.stanford.edu/).

Sinister Angel
01-04-2005, 00:35
I like using Fluxbox for my window manager. It's FAST.

Washington,D.C.
01-04-2005, 01:36
My girlfriend got a degree in math but didn't want to teach.She is Italian and the Italian government paid for her to learn programming.It took her less than one year.She learned C and C++.Now she works as a programmer for the telephone company.

SamBuca
01-04-2005, 03:14
Originally posted by Washington,D.C.
My girlfriend got a degree in math but didn't want to teach.She is Italian and the Italian government paid for her to learn programming.It took her less than one year.She learned C and C++.Now she works as a programmer for the telephone company.
If you ever break up, send her my way ;)

David_G17
01-04-2005, 13:18
Java runs too dang slow.

I'd recommend C++ (it's probably more like VB than C is).

David_G17
01-04-2005, 13:20
Originally posted by Vince
Since I've been using Windows for years, I'm a little nervous about switching completely over to Linux, but imagine I'll do it soon after I learn more and get a little more comfortable.

dual-boot linux and windows.

check out open office. it's like microsoft office but free (and comes with pretty much all linux distributions).

Riverweasel
01-04-2005, 13:29
I long for the days of Cobol, Fortran, and RPGII....NOT!!
Sorry, showing my age!!