Concensus for favorite bullet weight in 44Mag? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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MCNETT
01-20-2005, 12:50
I am curious, what is your favorite bullet weight in .44Mag?
Favorite type of bullet?
-Mike

fnfalman
01-20-2005, 12:53
This is not fair! I like both the 300-grainer AND 180-grainer.

Berto
01-20-2005, 12:59
:)

It's a nice round number.

ithaca_deerslayer
01-20-2005, 13:09
I like semi-jacketed hollow point .240 grain.

ceemack
01-20-2005, 15:02
Ummmm...wouldn't that depend on the purpose?

wanderinwalker
01-20-2005, 15:23
240. It is was I use for all of my .44 Magnum and Special target and "play" loads. For hauling around on woods duty/hunting I might prefer a 275 or 300, but for all other chores the 240 is adequate.

MCNETT
01-20-2005, 15:57
Ummmm...wouldn't that depend on the purpose?
Of course. I am just asking what you shoot the most of...or like to shoot the most.
-Mike

Rabon
01-20-2005, 16:00
I use a 320 Gr. cast.

a1b2c3
01-20-2005, 18:16
I prefer 240 since all I hunt with my 629 are two legged predators.

surfinusa
01-20-2005, 20:46
240 JSP

Mike357S
01-21-2005, 12:22
I have two 44 mags...and they both keep Speer 240grainers in the cylinder. I also practice with 240gr rounds. So, for my purposes, the 240gr is great. It really all depends on what you intend to do with the round as to what bullet size would be your favorite.

bac1023
01-21-2005, 16:36
I love shooting the 180gr. It shoots flat and velocity is high.

opossum
01-21-2005, 19:26
I shoot 240gr. Winchester Jacketed Soft point in my Ruger Redhawk.

cactusman
01-23-2005, 15:44
240-grain.

freepatriot
01-23-2005, 16:43
Technically my fave is the 250 grain keith bullet but they're hard to find, so I settle for the 240 grainers. I buy mine from Meister. $40 for 500 of 'em.


http://freepatriot.com/imagewarehouse/keith/240LSWC.JPG

freepatriot
01-23-2005, 16:47
http://freepatriot.com/imagewarehouse/brass-components.jpg

sheriff 54
01-26-2005, 09:30
I use the 240, in Remington’s floral pattern JHP, in a hard cast SWC and sometimes in a JSP. I do two loads, one at about 1000 fps and the other is a bit warm. But I only use the 240's. Yes, I still have some 180's, they are hot but I am stuck on the 240's... You will find a place that is good for you.;a

MCNETT
01-27-2005, 00:41
Keep 'em coming! I want everyone to vote, I am trying to get a concensus of as many .44 fans as possible.
-Mike

jesse485
01-27-2005, 15:36
Does this mean we can look for a Double Tap .44 load? I would certainly be interested.

DocH
01-29-2005, 08:31
Always preferred the 240gr. for an all around load.
Years ago,when I still reloaded,I used a 240gr.Hornady half jacket soft point.Put a few deer on the ground with it.

bachchoy
01-29-2005, 08:33
44Mag?

all good!

SCmasterblaster
01-30-2005, 06:21
I use a home-cast 210-gr flat-base wadcutter bullet ahead of 7.5 grains of HTG. 1150 fps, very accurate out of my 6-inch M629, and a great pin-killer. I suppose it would work well in the field at higher velcities.

TED
01-31-2005, 11:58
I would use .44 mag for large animal defense and hunting so I voted for the 300gr. However, 240 would be my second choice and it is what I acutally have been using in my .44 rifle. I shoot .44 mag from an old Ruger tube fed carbine.

TED

khillery
02-03-2005, 22:25
Speer factory Gold Dot 270 gr.
The velocity is 1250 I believe. I found that this load will shoot to just a shade over two inches at 100 yds benched. I have done this all three times that I shot at that distance.
The revolver is an 8 1/2 inch "Realtree" Anaconda wearing a small Tasco 2000 red dot. [I also have one on my G-36].
Interestingly enough, the groups at fifty and seventy five are not much smaller....some folks say that bullets sometimes "go to sleep" on the way to the target and will perform like that.
I took one smaller deer with it at sixty five yards, about two inches low and two inches behind the elbow of the front leg. The deer went down and never regained its feet. The bullet was recovered from the ground behind and showed very little expansion.
That load is also the best I can find for Clements Custom .44 Ruger Blackhawk also, but only 1 1/2 in at 25 yds with open sights.:)

akbound
02-04-2005, 09:23
My choice is a 240 grain bullet of some type (depending upon specific purpose) for deer/men and smaller. A 300-330 grain hard cast bullet is used for everything bigger. Velocities may be varied to suit individual purpose as well. Usually plinking fodder is a 240 grain cast lead to a little less than 1000 fps, doubles for head shooting small game as well. Never had a rabbit walk away yet ;) !

Keeping it fairly simple! :)

Dave

P.S. It is not normally my choice for defense against two-legged predators.

Brasso
02-05-2005, 20:35
I voted 270gr, but actually prefer 280gr. It's a nice compromise for weight and velocity.

CCV
02-10-2005, 17:37
Originally posted by scottauld
Technically my fave is the 250 grain keith bullet but they're hard to find, so I settle for the 240 grainers. I buy mine from Meister. $40 for 500 of 'em.


http://freepatriot.com/imagewarehouse/keith/240LSWC.JPG

For real "Keith" bullets (just like Elmer liked) try www.proshootpro.com

13.45
02-13-2005, 20:15
300 :)

CanyonMan
03-03-2005, 14:09
Hands down, the 250gr. Keith, and the 300gr. My Vote Mike.

BTW..."scottauld," the link that 'CCV' gave you for "real Keith bullets," is right on!

Leadheads, 250gr. Keith. I have been shooting Keith bullets, for over 30 years, finally found a place that has the "real deal." !


***EDIT NOTE*** Mike, if you have something 'up your sleeve here,' allow me to throw this in as well. Although i voted "300", cause i do use them for "most hunting situations," I also use the 250gr. 'Keith', as i stated above. BUT, i only have the 'one source' to buy from....(cause i am 'extremely picky' ), when it comes to Cast, and Especially, "Keith" style bullets.

So, that being said... Whatever you are "hatching" in the bullet part of that brain of yours, "Please consider making a REAL TRUE TO SPECS,
250gr. KEITH."

LeadHeads is a really great supplier of these REAL KEITH bullets, but, "we need more than one man ! " ;)


CanyonMan

J.P.
03-10-2005, 01:14
Originally posted by scottauld
Technically my fave is the 250 grain keith bullet but they're hard to find, so I settle for the 240 grainers. I buy mine from Meister. $40 for 500 of 'em.


http://freepatriot.com/imagewarehouse/keith/240LSWC.JPG

I agree.
I voted 240gr (SWC)

G-Bone
03-23-2005, 21:38
240gr is very nice, you can still make it go really really fast! ;)

Bullet, for general purpose, IMHO, nothing can beat Speers Gold Dot.


There, know you have my $0.02 ;n

anomad
03-26-2005, 21:17
My all purpose bullet is a 240gr jacketed lead flat nose. Works well in the rifle or pistol.

For serious hunting I would load up some warm 300gr hornady XTP's or speer uni-cor soft points. I carried 300's and 240's at different times in Alaska.

Smaug
03-31-2005, 13:54
I voted 180 gr. Close second would be the 240 gr. plated from Rainier.

I voted 180 gr. because they're easier to shoot as a daily round.

Even with a light/medium powder charge, it would be enough to stop most men in their tracks. It is DAMN sure strong enough to punch nice holes in paper, and it is easy enough to shoot that you can shoot many hundreds of rounds.

When I'm in a 44 mood, I usually shoot two boxes of 180-185 gr "heavy Specials" and half a box of magnums with 240 gr. and a magnum powder.

deutscheglocker
04-07-2005, 17:22
I like 240gr Speer but have really not experimented with anything other than those and 180's.

DG

redskyzatknight
05-06-2005, 00:28
I voted for 240. Next choice would be 200. GD's and whatever may be cheaper for practice would be two nice options.

Short Cut
05-15-2005, 19:26
I shoot 240 most often followed by 300.

tjohnson
05-19-2005, 12:15
Everybody has 240gr. cast bullets for sale, Penn bullets has some nice ones, but you have to search and search to find INEXPENSIVE good
heavy weight bullets. I did find Rim Rock bullets has a nice looking 300gr. for just over 50.00/thousand. Prime reloading supply even lists one for 40/thousand. But most places charge over 130/thousand for their 320gr or 330gr. heavy weights. Now I understand some are custom hand cast bullets....OK..... but it is hard to find quality moderately priced heavy weight bullets in the 44 mag. I particularly am interested in .431 diameter because of my Super Redhawk. Looks like by the voting that a bullet maker.....cough....cough.....like Mcnett should make a 240gr. but it also hints that in a strong second place there is the desire for a 300-330 grain bullet. I would add, with a meplat of around .320 or so, not too small so it tumbles and reduces penetration but not too big so you lose accuracy over longer ranges.....so now.......Goooooo
300-330 weight.......

Sulaco
05-31-2005, 09:08
240's and 270's are more popular with me, but it depends on the purpose. I only have one 44 Magnum and it is a leveraction rifle. It is used as a backup deer gun and a truck gun. For personal defense, I keep it stoked with Winchester Powertip HP's (not made anymore, but the same as Black Talon's) in 240gr. For deer hunting, I shoot a Buffalo Bore 305gr. LBT/LFN.

I wish my Winny could chamber these badboys, but they are a tad too long. It will stabilize them though and they shoot well, just don't feed worth a darn.

http://www.buffalobore.com/ammunition/images/44+p.JPG

PaleGreenHorse
06-12-2005, 01:58
240gr. Speer Gold Dot for defense.
280gr. LFN Beartooth for hunting.
;f

TacticalShot
06-14-2005, 16:09
Weights:
240gr - general purpose
300gr - hunting
260gr - hunting (for variety)
280gr - hunting (for variety)

Bullets:
Gold Dot - general purpose + hunting
Hornady XTP - hunting
LFNGC - hunting
==========================
http://www.cafepress.com/2d_amendment

COWBOYSHOOTER
06-15-2005, 19:12
200 grain. Usually a Hornady XTP. Significantly reduces recoil for the magnum loads. My hands just dont handle it very well anymore. Also makes up a very nice 44SPL load. MMMM 44 Special ;f

Jim Ewing
08-28-2005, 07:37
240gr Gold Dot for night stand
310gr Garrett Hammerheads for hunting

spober
09-07-2005, 18:39
i have a box of 20 winchester platinum tip 250 GR.PTHP Ive been ichin to send down range threw my 8 inch anaconda.btw with 310 grn hammer heads and stout 44 mag ammo like that whats really the point of all these super big bores?ive fallen into the bigger than yours cycle a bit with a 454 ragging bull and a SRH in 480 ruger.i refuse to get a 50 their just too big!but really ,i remember back when i was a teenager(70s dirty harry)the lore of the 44 mag and how even a mighty griz could be harvested with such a handgun.(besides the camera guy im sure their was at least one heavily armed rifleman back up!maby 2

jimw
10-10-2005, 20:41
240 gr Hornady XTP over 4227.

vafish
11-30-2005, 12:44
Biggest thing I shoot with my .44 mag are white tail deer or black bear.

The 240 gr in either a JHP or JSP works fine for them.

Glock 'N Loaded
12-01-2005, 18:17
I voted 240 gr. for most typical situations...However when I go Boar Hutin' it's always a 300 gr. cast, to put bacon on my table through my S&W 629

g88
12-23-2005, 12:34
Speer 270gr Gold Dot Softpoint. Very accurate from my Smiths and Redhawk. Gets excellent reviews when rated by customers on Midway USA's rating system. Seems like a good woods bullet. I load them to about 1170 fps. g88

Glolt20-91
03-06-2006, 21:38
I loaded a modest (not max) AA #9 with Win 210gr Silvertips (avg 1550fps, 1150fpe) and had three expansions from shooting through sheet metal/wood between about .92" and 1.106". I forget the fourth recovered diameter (.60 something), but it spun off a lead sliver 1/4"x1 1/4". (M629 w/6.5" classic barrel).

This is basically a home defense round, however, it also will penetrate two full creosote bushes and arrived on target 100% of the time on four separate tests. Even 1/2" and 5/8" branches don't deflect this combination. This may turn out to be my desert carry for mountain lion defense as it is also very accurate. I expect this combination will give explosive expansion and full penetration on a lion or BG - also known as two legged coyotes in this part of the country. :)

For mountain trails, I'll experiment with harder 240-250gr bullets on the slim chance of having a bear encounter. :)

FWIW, I'm seeing a number of XTP jackets laying on the ground and no holes on target when shooting through brush in other calibers.

Adios,
Bob

Oh, did I state 210gr Silvertips as one favorite??? ;a

Butch
05-14-2006, 22:21
I cast my own......and I'm surprised that Elmer's favorite isn't listed in your poll! 250! :)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0603/ButchG17/Ammo%20pics/Kieth44s.jpg



:patriot:

9mm +p+
09-13-2006, 17:12
My 44 is a toy for me, i've got SD covered. I shoot 300's and heavier almost exclusively. So I voted 300 gr hard cast preferably:supergrin:

Two Guns
10-10-2006, 18:36
240 for me.

TattooedGlock
04-04-2007, 13:55
330 grain Hammerheads from Garrett Ammo

slugman
04-29-2007, 22:58
300-320 GRAIN HARDCAST

steve1911
07-21-2007, 00:09
240gr reloads in jhp, and cast make my own bullets.

1911club#410

Bonk
08-03-2007, 19:03
240gr LSWC reloads for fun, 240 gr JHP's for deer hunting.

Awasos
11-03-2007, 11:37
250 gr Beartooth Bullet WFNGC for all around use. Like 300 WFNGC and 200 XTP as well.

countryrebel
12-15-2007, 16:12
I like 180 xtp and 240 xtp.Just started using 250 wfngc beartooths and going to experiment with a few others.

Update, I quit using beartooths because it takes so long to get them. Mostly use 240xtp's for everything.

John R
12-06-2008, 10:11
I normally shoot the 240's, but the 180's are good too.

Bannack
01-10-2009, 19:21
I currently use a 305-gr LBT WFN GC from Rim Rock Bullets for all my outdoor loadings. This is the same bullet that Tim Sundles uses for his 305-gr LBT load @ Buffalo Bore Ammunition.

http://www.rimrockbullets.net/catalog/images/44_CAL_305_GR_WFN.png

Parisite
02-25-2009, 22:11
240gr cast lead semi wadcutters is what I shoot and reload.

They don't lead up even at full power. Great cheap bullets.

MSgt Dotson
07-23-2010, 12:29
I have some plinking/practice loads of 200 gr jacketed flatpoints moving along at a modest 1075 fps...

Controllable, and pleasant....!

GLShooter
08-17-2010, 19:33
240's across the board for plinking and IHMSA.

Greg

MakeMineA10mm
08-19-2010, 10:43
Dug up kindof an old one, but it's a good one. I missed it originally, so here's my take, if anyone is still listening.

After lots of trying, I've decided that 180s and even 200gr bullets are not effecient and do not produce very balanced loads in the 44 Magnum. While they can be very accurate, it seems it takes a lot of work to find the sweet spot to get them that accurate, and once that's done, you really only have a low-recoil target load, IMO, because these bullets just don't have the SD for decent penetration and they blow-up too easily (in JHP form) for salvageable small game hunting. I guess they'd be interesting P-Dog loads, but even then, the heavier-bullet loads have better long-range trajectory, so that's only a short-range benefit. I don't mess with them anymore.

I found that around 210grs, bullets start getting a LOT better. They have enough bore-riding surface (or at least that's what I theorize is the benefit) that it's fairly easy to find accurate loads without much work. Also, we're finally getting to a weight that occupies enough space in the case to give better load density, and the weight of the bullet provides better resistance to the powder to cause better combustion in more combinations than with the 180s. I buy and shoot a fair number of Rem. 210gr SJHPs, but Win. 210gr STHPs would work well too. I like Lyman 431215 mould, which makes 215 to 220gr bullets that are also pretty accurate with lower recoil and conservation of my lead supply.

However, even though the 210s are kind-of my "minimum" weight class for 44s, for a "lightweight" bullet in the 44 Mag, I like 225s even better. The Speer 225gr HJ-SWC-HP is my favorite defense and light-hunting (Texas scrub whitetails, coyotes, and game of that size or smaller) bullet in the 44. My primary "practice load" bullet is a 225gr RNFP, which is also a dandy rabbit load, because it doesn't destroy meat like an expanding bullet. Developing accurate loads with these bullets is a piece of cake, and load balance is good enough that virtually any pistol powder is able to be utilized with these bullets and give good ignition.

There's nothing wrong with 240-250gr bullets in the 44 Mag, and you can see by their popularity in this poll that they certainly work, or many wouldn't use them. They work so well, because it's what the cartridge was designed around. My favorites are: Lyman 430421 (245-250gr Keith SWC), RCBS 44-250-KT (part # 82044) (which is even more true to the original Keith design than the Lyman these days), and the Win. 240gr JHSP. An very exemplary bullet in this weight class is the Nosler 250gr Partition Gold bullet. If you're looking for a premium bullet for the 44 Magnum that can do anything and everything in the realm of hunting, this is it.

A bullet weight range that was pretty ignored until recently is the 260-290gr weight range. For many, many years, only the Hornady 265gr JSP (for the 444 Marlin) was available, and many respected and famous gun writers said it was not ideal and "too much of a good thing" in the 44 Mag. They've since ate those words and turned out looking like sissies, because silhouette shooters started shooting 300+gr bullets... I think truth be told, the writers were shocked and unhappy with the recoil, or felt the masses would be and would complain to the editors about them. This is actually my favorite weight range for serious 44 Mag loads. I designed a custom 265-270gr (depending upon the alloy you use) Keith SWC that religiously adheres to his principles. My only change was making the drive-bands a little wider. Keith in his later writings mentioned once or twice that the only improvement on his original bullet would be to try it a little heavier to around 270grs, and that's what I did. For a "maximum effort" bullet in the 44 Magnum, I really like the Lyman 430640 RNFP. It's pretty much a cross between the WFN and LFN bullets, so I call it a "MFN" (Medium Flat Nose). It's a balanced design that feeds through lever-action carbines well, and is correctly balanced to minimize it's impact on the powder reservoir inside the case while simultaneously giving a lot of weight. It's very accurate and has a nice, big meplat (flat nose). Depending on alloy, it weighs between 275 and 285grs. (My "hard" bullets, which are WW+2% tin weigh 281grs.)

Now, there's plenty of bullets which weigh 300+grs for the 44; however, I don't like them. For the most part they are marketing gimmicks or ego-gratifiers. The ammo companies know that having a 300gr bullet is going to sell a heck of a lot better than a 290gr bullet. That's in spite of the fact that they did the research back in the 60s and discovered that a 290gr bullet was the ideal maximum weight to get the best combination of penetration, energy, load balance (room for powder in the case, combined with ignition reliability, combined with useful velocity and bullet weight), and reasonable pressures. This crossed over into any .430" bullet in a straight-walled case with high pressure loads, as they tested it in the 444 Marlin as well, and it still held true. Remington actually had a 280gr bullet ready to market in this caliber in the 60s, but Hornady beat them to the market by a couple months, and Remington decided to discontinue the project, probably on the theory that the market wouldn't support more than one heavy-bullet for the caliber, and Hornady's was already out... (They looked at things different back then.)

I use cast bullets pretty much exclusively in the 44s, with the exception of the Ruger 44 Carbine (I have an original from the early mid-60s), whose gas system requires a jacketed bullet to prevent fouling. The only jacketed bullet I'd look at seriously in place of a cast bullet is the Partition (or the similar Swift A-Frames). Since pistols are weak hunting tools compared to the rifle or shotgun, I want my pistol loads to penetrate. Cast bullets with good, large flat points do that well, and disrupt a lot of tissue too. That's the killing mechanism and it works every bit as well as a JHP, but more reliably.

nickE10mm
08-22-2010, 00:33
Dug up kindof an old one, but it's a good one. I missed it originally, so here's my take, if anyone is still listening.

After lots of trying, I've decided that 180s and even 200gr bullets are not effecient and do not produce very balanced loads in the 44 Magnum. While they can be very accurate, it seems it takes a lot of work to find the sweet spot to get them that accurate, and once that's done, you really only have a low-recoil target load, IMO, because these bullets just don't have the SD for decent penetration and they blow-up too easily (in JHP form) for salvageable small game hunting. I guess they'd be interesting P-Dog loads, but even then, the heavier-bullet loads have better long-range trajectory, so that's only a short-range benefit. I don't mess with them anymore.

I found that around 210grs, bullets start getting a LOT better. They have enough bore-riding surface (or at least that's what I theorize is the benefit) that it's fairly easy to find accurate loads without much work. Also, we're finally getting to a weight that occupies enough space in the case to give better load density, and the weight of the bullet provides better resistance to the powder to cause better combustion in more combinations than with the 180s. I buy and shoot a fair number of Rem. 210gr SJHPs, but Win. 210gr STHPs would work well too. I like Lyman 431215 mould, which makes 215 to 220gr bullets that are also pretty accurate with lower recoil and conservation of my lead supply.

However, even though the 210s are kind-of my "minimum" weight class for 44s, for a "lightweight" bullet in the 44 Mag, I like 225s even better. The Speer 225gr HJ-SWC-HP is my favorite defense and light-hunting (Texas scrub whitetails, coyotes, and game of that size or smaller) bullet in the 44. My primary "practice load" bullet is a 225gr RNFP, which is also a dandy rabbit load, because it doesn't destroy meat like an expanding bullet. Developing accurate loads with these bullets is a piece of cake, and load balance is good enough that virtually any pistol powder is able to be utilized with these bullets and give good ignition.

There's nothing wrong with 240-250gr bullets in the 44 Mag, and you can see by their popularity in this poll that they certainly work, or many wouldn't use them. They work so well, because it's what the cartridge was designed around. My favorites are: Lyman 430421 (245-250gr Keith SWC), RCBS 44-250-KT (part # 82044) (which is even more true to the original Keith design than the Lyman these days), and the Win. 240gr JHSP. An very exemplary bullet in this weight class is the Nosler 250gr Partition Gold bullet. If you're looking for a premium bullet for the 44 Magnum that can do anything and everything in the realm of hunting, this is it.

A bullet weight range that was pretty ignored until recently is the 260-290gr weight range. For many, many years, only the Hornady 265gr JSP (for the 444 Marlin) was available, and many respected and famous gun writers said it was not ideal and "too much of a good thing" in the 44 Mag. They've since ate those words and turned out looking like sissies, because silhouette shooters started shooting 300+gr bullets... I think truth be told, the writers were shocked and unhappy with the recoil, or felt the masses would be and would complain to the editors about them. This is actually my favorite weight range for serious 44 Mag loads. I designed a custom 265-270gr (depending upon the alloy you use) Keith SWC that religiously adheres to his principles. My only change was making the drive-bands a little wider. Keith in his later writings mentioned once or twice that the only improvement on his original bullet would be to try it a little heavier to around 270grs, and that's what I did. For a "maximum effort" bullet in the 44 Magnum, I really like the Lyman 430640 RNFP. It's pretty much a cross between the WFN and LFN bullets, so I call it a "MFN" (Medium Flat Nose). It's a balanced design that feeds through lever-action carbines well, and is correctly balanced to minimize it's impact on the powder reservoir inside the case while simultaneously giving a lot of weight. It's very accurate and has a nice, big meplat (flat nose). Depending on alloy, it weighs between 275 and 285grs. (My "hard" bullets, which are WW+2% tin weigh 281grs.)

Now, there's plenty of bullets which weigh 300+grs for the 44; however, I don't like them. For the most part they are marketing gimmicks or ego-gratifiers. The ammo companies know that having a 300gr bullet is going to sell a heck of a lot better than a 290gr bullet. That's in spite of the fact that they did the research back in the 60s and discovered that a 290gr bullet was the ideal maximum weight to get the best combination of penetration, energy, load balance (room for powder in the case, combined with ignition reliability, combined with useful velocity and bullet weight), and reasonable pressures. This crossed over into any .430" bullet in a straight-walled case with high pressure loads, as they tested it in the 444 Marlin as well, and it still held true. Remington actually had a 280gr bullet ready to market in this caliber in the 60s, but Hornady beat them to the market by a couple months, and Remington decided to discontinue the project, probably on the theory that the market wouldn't support more than one heavy-bullet for the caliber, and Hornady's was already out... (They looked at things different back then.)

I use cast bullets pretty much exclusively in the 44s, with the exception of the Ruger 44 Carbine (I have an original from the early mid-60s), whose gas system requires a jacketed bullet to prevent fouling. The only jacketed bullet I'd look at seriously in place of a cast bullet is the Partition (or the similar Swift A-Frames). Since pistols are weak hunting tools compared to the rifle or shotgun, I want my pistol loads to penetrate. Cast bullets with good, large flat points do that well, and disrupt a lot of tissue too. That's the killing mechanism and it works every bit as well as a JHP, but more reliably.

Great post, man. :)

Mikie
11-09-2010, 14:31
I like the Bear Creek Moly-coated 240 gr SWC. I can drive them at magnum velocities and still get the barrel nice and shiny without heavy lead removal.

FM12
04-20-2011, 16:32
Favorite is a Speer 200 grain Mag Tip JHP over a bunch of either 296 or H110.

AZ_Quailhunter
08-10-2012, 22:20
Have to say 240gr. Sierras for 90 percent of my shooting.
Hunting would be 250gr or better....any type.

nickE10mm
02-19-2013, 22:04
And by the way, I like a 250gr, flat based, wide grease-grooved Keith at 1000-1200fps for most all deer hunting and plinking and anything or lighter for coyotes at long range. Also, lightly loaded solids using head shots wilke rabbit and squirrel with practice and no meat damage. l

cherokeewarrior
07-03-2013, 19:33
Have used 240 jhp and 200 jhp for deer, didn't see much difference in the result. Both were one shot stops.

nickE10mm
07-03-2013, 20:22
Although, admittedly, I've been liking heavier stuff in emergencies. ;). 280gr WFNGC at 1100fps.

smokeross
07-03-2013, 22:40
You totally missed one of the best bullets for hunting with the .44 magnum. I use the Hornady bullet designed for the .444 Marlin rifle. It's a 265 grain with less exposed lead that is harder than most since it's designed for higher velocity. Also has a thicker jacket.
Don't have to pay a premium price for them. They penetrate great. 23 grains of Winchester 296 will push it right along.

Buckeye63
05-08-2014, 17:17
I was late on voteing on the poll...my only 44 mag at this time is a Rossi snubbie (Taurus tracker) ..and 240gr is my favorite 44 mag load...for SD I use 44 Spl. ammo...

http://i57.tinypic.com/ogevyp.jpg

Redhawk45
10-06-2014, 07:55
210 grain: Remington SJHP to reload, Winchester Silvertip off the shelf. Deer and self defense.