National Register Exam [Archive] - Glock Talk

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WPD80
03-13-2005, 14:55
I have learned that Illinois, no longer will have a EMT-B exam, thanks to some Chicago EMT/Fireman whom gave a copy of the state exam to the local press.

This now has made the Illinois Department of Public Health resort in the using of the National Registery exam for all EMT-B's.

Has anyone here evern taken it? Kinda has me and my class of 14 worried about it.

Tom;Q

TerraMedicX
03-13-2005, 16:05
Yea we had a similar incident here in Colorado. Now the state has discontinued doing ALL testing written or practical. Then again, we've had quite a bit of problems in the last year in our state EMS department.

Nate.

DaleGribble
03-13-2005, 17:27
I'm not bragging or anything but I found the NREMTB exam to be easier than some of the exams we had in class.

WPD80
03-13-2005, 18:36
Man I sure hope so. I am half way through and doing O.K. so far. I am just a little concerned over the National Test. Oh Well, what can't kill yah, will make you stronger!;b

TerraMedicX
03-14-2005, 12:12
Originally posted by DaleGribble
I'm not bragging or anything but I found the NREMTB exam to be easier than some of the exams we had in class.


This is VERY dependant on the class you went through!! I also found that after the tests and level of knowledge required by the Paramedic program I went through, that the National Registry test was pretty easy. On the other hand, I am currently working with a member of my fire department who just failed his NREMT-B exam for the second time! The only thing I found to be exceptionally difficult about the NR exam, was the way the questions were worded, which I felt was made intentionally confusing in some places. That's my opinion and experience.

Nate.

WPD80
03-14-2005, 12:36
This is what we have heard also. The last class of 12 prospective EMT's that took the NRE, 4 failed. They all felt the same way as the instuctor. There are wording problems with the test. They also said that there was more than one correct answer.

Oh Well, I'll take and see what happens.

Tom;)

lomfs24
03-15-2005, 22:49
Let me preface this by saying that I have just completed the EMT-B course in Montana and will be doing my National Registry practical exam this Sat. and the written part in a couple weeks. It's spread out and it kinda sucks but that has to do with our local Medical Director.

Anyway, from what I understand, the books are not written on the NREMT ciriculum but rather written on the authors best intentions to convey the curiculum. So what is on the test is often construed as misleading questions because what you remember is how the book presented it.

I got a copy of the ciriculum from my instructor (it's about 2 reems of printed paper) and he said that if you put the book aside and drill that document into your head there is no reason why you wouldn't ace the written test.

The test is multiple test is written to weed out people who don't know the material frontwards and backwards. The idea being that if you really know the material the right answer will pop out at you and the wrong answers will just be wrong. However, the wrong answers are written so that if you don't know the material they may look more logical.

They told me there is a place on the net where you can download the ciriculum but I didn't look for it cause he handed me a printed copy of it and I am glad because I sure didn't want to print it.

lomfs24
03-15-2005, 23:01
Originally posted by WPD80
They also said that there was more than one correct answer.

Tom;)

I have also heard this as well, there is more than one right answer. What you have to remember is that they are looking for the BEST answer, not always the RIGHT answer.


For instance. The question may be... Your patient has a mid-shaft femur fracture. You should....

A) splint with a traction splint, secure to back board after applying oxygen via NRB mask.
B) splint with traction splint, secure to backboard and treat for shock.
C) yada yada yada
D) yada yada yada

Both answers are correct, but A is better answer because you are applying oxygen.

One question that we had that threw us for a loop in class was You are called to a pt. who had a seizure. What would you not ask bystanders?
A) What did they do during the seizure.
B) Did pt. loose control of their bladder.
C) Does the pts. family have a history of seizure.
D) What did the pt. do after the seizure was over.

We all thought that B was the correct answer because it would be fairly obvious would probably not need to be asked However, C was the right answer because you are not going to immediately treat their family in the field. So the questions came up "Why were we taught to ask a Heart Attack victim if their family has a history of heart attack?" You would think that the same principle would apply. But C was still the right answer because it was the BEST answer.

Glock-A-Roo
03-16-2005, 11:41
Originally posted by lomfs24
...For instance. The question may be... Your patient has a mid-shaft femur fracture. You should....

A) splint with a traction splint, secure to back board after applying oxygen via NRB mask.
B) splint with traction splint, secure to backboard and treat for shock.
C) yada yada yada
D) yada yada yada

Both answers are correct, but A is better answer because you are applying oxygen...

Actually, you have provided a perfect example of a question that could be reasonably be interpreted in various ways by well-educated candidates.

How? Try the following lines of reasoning:

(A) is the best answer because it explicitly mentions applying O2

OR...

(B) is the best answer because "treating for shock" includes applying O2. This answer is better because it includes more standard-of-care treatments for shock than just O2. Take a look at the National Registry's own skillsheet for "Bleeding Control/Shock Management". It lists the 4 steps to be taken to handle shock/hypoperfusion:

- "properly position the patient"
- "apply high concentration oxygen"
- "initiate steps to prevent heat loss from patient"
- "indicate need for immediate transport"

OR...

(A) is the best answer because it describes applying O2 BEFORE moving the patient to the backboard, and even though answer (B) includes more steps to fight shock, you should be applying O2 before using the board because its part of the initial A/B/C treatment course.

OR...

(B) is still the better answer because you should have already applied O2 before applying the traction splint, since Breathing/Oxygenation should be handled before Circulation issues. So the fact that answer (B) listed the traction splint first means you must have already handled Breathing/Oxygenation (which includes O2), therefore (B) is best because it includes more of the standard treatments for shock.

See what I mean? Are they looking for you to treat shock inadequately, or are they checking if you'll make the mistake of applying secondary treatments (backboard) before A/B/C measures (O2) ?

It all boils down to what they're fishing for. It won't matter anyway, though, because when you start doing this stuff for real, you'll see that there's all kinds of exceptions and variances out on the street.

Edge
05-20-2005, 10:12
I live in Illinois and took the NRE last December. The instructor is an active paramedic who was locally famous for his hard tests and class. Basically, everyone said that if you could make it through his class and exams, you could ace the state test. Just three students were in our class (others dropped). Of the three, one of them used to be an EMT. Another's father is an active EMT. I was the odd one out with relatively little medical knowledge. All three of us did well in class and on the final. Of the three in class, I was the only one that passed. The other two studied big time and retook it, but still didn't pass.

I tend to be very good at taking tests (highest score in history of a large brokerage firm on securities test), but I thought the NRE was a very bad test. In fact, it was probably the most poorly designed tests I have ever taken. I repeat, in my opinion, the National Registry EMT-B Exam is an extremely poorly designed / written test that badly needs redone.

WPD80
05-20-2005, 10:25
Well, I have three more weeks to take the NRE. I graduated with my class with a 85% average...I was told that I was going to be close on the NRE, due to you can take 10% off your average for the NRE.

I have been a first responder for three years, and responded to many of calls. I am very very concerned about the EMT NRE exam. My instructor gave us all a 150 question practice exam from the NRE...I got a 74%, which is passing, but with not much room for error....

Oh well, I'll give it my best shot....Tom;)

Edge
05-20-2005, 16:36
Tom:
You might do fine. It depends a lot on the preparation class you are taking probably. I remember thinking my NRE didn't have many questions related to the ABCs, which is what I believed was the primary focus of the EMT-B. Not much directly related bones, organs, muscles, circulatory system, etc. either if memory serves. It seems like the test was very heavy on scenarios with multiple judgment call type questions / answers which the above posters did a good & accurate job discussing / providing examples. It wasn’t a tough test. It was a bad test.
Jeff