Hot topic in some forums. [Archive] - Glock Talk

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lomfs24
06-09-2005, 22:56
My book that I studied (Now You're Talking by ARRL, 5th addition) said that if .... I'll just quote it.

This is talking about internet gateways using VoIP. Systems such as IRLP, EchoLink, etc...
Now You're Talking, 5th Addition published by the ARRL p. 6.10 Figure 6.3
If a control operator is not physically present at the station location and the node is functioning with wireless remote control, the control link must operate above 222.15 MHz.
I know of many IRLP nodes that are operating on 2 Meters. And more being added. This part of my book simply states that with no reference to anything in FCC rules or Part 97. I have mentioned it once on the IRLP Yahoo groups and was politely told that since I was a newbie it would be in my best interest to not bring it up again.

Does anyone know where there is an actuall FCC ruling on this or anything in Part 97 that addresses this? Where does the ARRL come up this this particular idea?

Glock Bob
06-10-2005, 13:10
It would be in your best interests to not bring it up again.







































;) Just kidding!
What, exactly, does "control link" mean? My guess is it's a wireless bridge between the node and the wireless operator. Perhaps it has to be above 222 MHz.

EUPHER49
06-10-2005, 15:00
I wonder if this has to do with linking remote sites with a main controller?
A local repeater here has two remotes that extend the coverage. and the remotes receive the 2M input then on a 440 repeater they transmit the audio to the main site which retransmits on the 2M output freq. I think those need to be on freqs above 2M. I don't know fer sure.

lomfs24
06-10-2005, 19:06
Originally posted by Glock Bob
What, exactly, does "control link" mean? My guess is it's a wireless bridge between the node and the wireless operator. Perhaps it has to be above 222 MHz. I don't know what "control link" means. I would interpret it to mean that the link that controls the node. Since a normal IRLP node is set up to accept DTMF tones then the controling link would be what ever freq the simplex or repeater was set to and would have to be over 222.15 MHz. I suppose a work around would be to send DTMF tones on one freq and do voice on another. But that would double your equipment costs. I don't see an advantage.

Again, the question is, Where is this addressed? Is this an FCC ruling that can be found there, or is it an ARRL suggestion? I am the last person to want to go against the grain but on the other hand, the statement in the book seems to be a bit arbitrary. I am just trying to find it written somewhere else like the FCC.

lomfs24
06-10-2005, 19:11
Originally posted by EUPHER49
I wonder if this has to do with linking remote sites with a main controller?
A local repeater here has two remotes that extend the coverage. and the remotes receive the 2M input then on a 440 repeater they transmit the audio to the main site which retransmits on the 2M output freq. I think those need to be on freqs above 2M. I don't know fer sure. To the best of my knowledge those should be acceptable. Merely since the controling link, the repeater, recieves from the remotes on 440. Again, I don't know and that's why I would like to find something from the FCC on this to clarify it, at least, in my own mind.

I would also be the last person to point at you and say "your repeater is illegal". Just trying to find some information as I am thinking about setting up an IRLP node and am begining the equipment selection process.

lomfs24
06-15-2005, 08:52
I found it! I found it! I found it!
Well, I didn't actually FIND it. Jim WW4M actually posted a link in another message board (Yes, GT is not the only one, just the best one) Here is a link if anyone is interested.

It is a PDF file so be prepared for that.

ARRL on VoIP (http://www.arrl.org/qst/2003/02/VoIP.pdf)

Glock Bob
06-15-2005, 09:20
Ah ha! So controlling the station via a remote radio must be done above 222.15 MHz, not communicating through it.