Combat Hapkido? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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wewalkamongyou
07-02-2005, 17:04
Anyone know anything about it? It sounds like a good match for me, and there is a school close by.Here is a link I have found
http://www.ichf.com/Info.htm

Roundeyesamurai
07-04-2005, 16:34
Smells fishy to me.

Anytime one sees "Combat" in the name of a martial art, it's likely a fraud. That's true whether the advertised name is "Combat Hapkido", "Combat Karate", whatever. Masters who spend enough time in legitimate martial arts to be appropriate in founding their own styles, don't advertise as "COMBAT" anything, because that's assumed from the outset. Such masters are considerably older than that guy appears.

Koreans, likewise, are historically loathe to grant any kind of special standing to non-Koreans when it comes to Korean martial arts. The best indicator of this, is the exceptionally low number of (legitimate) non-Korean 8th and 9th Dans (degrees black belt) in comparison to the number of non-Korean practicioners. The Koreans generally prefer to keep their martial arts under strictly Korean control (and frankly, I can't blame them for being that way).

Also, the amount of fraudulence found in Korean martial arts is extremely high, for a number of reasons (on which I will expand, if anyone is actually interested). Not that there isn't alot of good material in Korean arts, but simply that there is alot more chaff to sort.

wewalkamongyou
07-04-2005, 17:22
The website does seem to me mostly about him. He is in every pic.

TED
07-06-2005, 10:51
I don;t know about that specific site or who is puching it but I can tell you that the the ICHF is pretty interesting (I have a green belt in Hapkido with them and plan to go back and start again soon). My instructors were under Pelligrini (sp?) and I went to a seminar with him and Frank Brahm (they have since gone their seperate way) several years ago when he visited Anchorage.

Something I remember is that he is very pro-gun and said something to the effec that martial arts were for when you didn't have or could not reasonably use your gun otherwise just shoot the dirtbags. It is all just part of another set of tools and options.

I like and recommend Hapkido in general and "combat" Hapkido in particular.

TED

TED
07-06-2005, 10:55
Roundeye does make several good and valid points though BTW. I have had a positive experience though. Maybe I just don't know any better or maybe my instructors (the Martin family) made the difference. Who knows.

TED

Roundeyesamurai
07-06-2005, 11:30
TED:

If you've got good experience with this particular individual, that's a great thing. I really dislike "calling BS", although (especially in the martial arts community) it's often necessary.

Likewise I highly recommend Hapkido. I'm an Aikidoka and Hapkido is basically a kissing cousin.

Naturally, though, there are always the frauds for which to look.

TED
07-06-2005, 22:21
I don;t een know who runs or pushes the site that was linked to. I was jsut relating my experience with combat hapkido under Pelllligrini as taught by himsefl at a seminar once and through the Martin family in Anchroage in particular.

Your points are very valid. I think I just had good practical minded instructors (the Martins that is).

TED

bunkerbuster
07-17-2005, 01:40
Originally posted by Roundeyesamurai
Smells fishy to me.

Anytime one sees "Combat" in the name of a martial art, it's likely a fraud. That's true whether the advertised name is "Combat Hapkido", "Combat Karate", whatever. Masters who spend enough time in legitimate martial arts to be appropriate in founding their own styles, don't advertise as "COMBAT" anything, because that's assumed from the outset. Such masters are considerably older than that guy appears.

Koreans, likewise, are historically loathe to grant any kind of special standing to non-Koreans when it comes to Korean martial arts. The best indicator of this, is the exceptionally low number of (legitimate) non-Korean 8th and 9th Dans (degrees black belt) in comparison to the number of non-Korean practicioners. The Koreans generally prefer to keep their martial arts under strictly Korean control (and frankly, I can't blame them for being that way).

Also, the amount of fraudulence found in Korean martial arts is extremely high, for a number of reasons (on which I will expand, if anyone is actually interested). Not that there isn't alot of good material in Korean arts, but simply that there is alot more chaff to sort.


uhhhhhhhhh.. somewhat true.

For "example", Taekwondo. There are 2 types. One that got 5th degree in KOOK KI WON vs a person who got a 5th degree by some master in US.

If I was a Taekwondo student, I would rather take the class from a guy who got 5th in kook ki won (assuming, same teching skill, same $, etc).

I asked most of people, about Tae Kyun (i dont know how it spells), and most of Taekwondo students do not know that.

G33
07-17-2005, 13:41
Took Hapkido from Korean instructor.
It is tough from the get go.
No need to call it combat.

Roundeyesamurai
07-17-2005, 13:49
Originally posted by G33
Took Hapkido from Korean instructor.
It is tough from the get go.
No need to call it combat.

One word explanation:

MARKETING!!!

One need only look around the various internet forums (including this one) to see the marketing angle in play today:

"If it's 'traditional', it's useless! Come to me, I'll teach you about COMBAT!"

Never mind the fact that most such advertisers have absolutely no experience with truly traditional (classical) martial arts, and generally have NO combat experience (or EXTREMELY limited experience) either.

It's very much like the firearms fad today of "Paint it black, glue velcro on it, and call it 'tactical'". It's a fad, and it'll eventually go away.