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Bill Powell
08-07-2005, 15:00
Not too long after I arrived in Korea, Munsan-ni, First Cav Div, we had a Thanksgiving party. After the dinner and party was over they were going to throw away about fifty or sixty pounds of cheese, cold cuts, pieces of turkey pieces, and other turkey day goodies.

I checked out a 3/4 ton truck from the motor pool and hauled all these goodies to the edged of the town. There I called all the kids I could, together by the truck, and started handing out the goodies. They would take their treasure and run. Then I noticed that as the kids passed the houses, for most of them an arm would shoot out and the kid, and the goodies, would disappear into the house. I had also noticed that when the tempature was in the twenties the kids may be wearing T-shirts and shorts. About the time I was getting really pissed about that, I was hit with an important truth.

In a rice paddy economy the most important person to keep healthy is the father, cause every day he doesn't work, for whatever reason, is a day the family doesn't eat. He eats first, and gets the warmest clothing, and whatever else it takes to keep him working day by day.

I also found that the only people who cared who was in power was the top five per cent of the population.

This was forty years ago. They may have adopted a lot of the social programs that have screwed up other countries by now.

Bill Powell
08-07-2005, 19:35
One more, and then I will go back into fluff mode. I was driving through a village one day, and in the crowd lining the road was a little blonde girl, half Korean, half american soldier. I was driving a five ton tractor, pulling a 5000 gallon fuel tank. The truck was an M-52 for those of you familiar with military vehicles.

I suddenly felt the need to stop the truck, get out, and check out my surroundings. As I rounded the front of the truck, there on the ground and just getting up from two feet in front of my drive axle, was that little blonde girl. Had I not stopped exactly when I did, I would have run over that little girl. She had been pushed into the road by her mother or some other member of the family.

It was tough making a living in Korea, especially for someone with a little half breed girl. Under my truck, and dead, the little girl was worth about twenty five thousand dollars to her mother. That was about the going rate for a dead family member.

digitspaw, I was in Munsan-ni, just south of Freedom Bridge. We worked a lot with KATUSA soldiers. Just north of Munsan was a favorite spot for North Korean soldiers to set up an ambush and blow away a jeep load of people, and then haul ass for Seoul. To counter that they brought in a detachment of 1 st ROK Marines, anti terrorist unit. Not one group of infiltrators made it to Seoul after that. I was there 1960-61-62. I was eleven day short when they built the Berlin wall. I got extended 90, so I was a short timer for 101 days. I use to tell the newbies that I had as much time left as them I would get a bicycle and a basketball and ride through a mine field, dribbling that basketball.

Bill Powell
08-07-2005, 21:30
Part of my duties in the post office was getting the air mail to Kimpo Air Base. The military, if their infinite wisdom, decided that if it said air mail it would be flown.

So, I got up in the morning, loaded the processed mail in the truck, and drove over to 15 th Aviation Company, auxiallary field, and dropped off the air mail. After dropping the air mail I drove down through Seoul, across the Han river, and on to Kimpo Air Base. Half hour, or so, after I get to Kimpo the mail plane would show up, or the helicopter, whatever would fly that day. Remember that air mail drop off I told you about earlier? Remember that if I had left the air mail on the truck it would have gotten to Kimpo half an hour sooner? Remember the most important thing, and that was if it had an air mail stamp it would be flown, even if it was five or six miles, or in our case about forty miles. They had a couple of old Sikorsky H-19's, and sometimes we rode down in those. We picked up the surface mail at Inchon Harbor.

I remember one holiday we had picked up a semi load of surface mail, packages and stuff. While processing the mail someone noticed that one of the boxes was ripped open and some delicious looking chocolate chip cookies were spilling out. Guys started chowing down on the cookies, flicking away little bits of chocolate chips. One of the guys reached up in the box to grab some cookies and pulled out a big ship's rat that had been crushed in the box. Those extra bits of chocolate chip they were flicking off were bits of crushed ship's rat. They all went outside and had a group puke.

Bill Powell
08-07-2005, 22:23
Oh, they took her back that day. It had to be an accident for them to collect. There were other accidents in that area. I don't know if she survived or not.

In the houses in town se used to shoot rats off the rafters with .45 automatics, til someone called the MP's (usually referred to as part of a monkey's anatomy), and they started patrolling every few minutes. Then one day a guy showed up from the states with a shoe box full of little single barrel .22 derringers. He also had about ten boxes of .22 Thunderbolts. They were a graphite, ricochet proof rat round.

Bill Powell
08-08-2005, 06:54
digitspaw, I agree with the fact that on the surface people are pretty shallow. I think Americans are fortunate that they can complain about some of the petty things they complain about. On the other hand, it has been my experience that when called upon to perform, a majority will rise to the occasion. 9/11 was a good example. People stopped complaining in mid-sentence and started risking their lives to help victims of the attack. One entire plane load of people probably sacrificed themselves to stop that final plane. I think hidden in the majority of the people, hidden under that surface shallowness, is the willingness and the ability to rise to the occasion, what ever that occasion may be.

I was fair friends with one of the roving portrait artists that worked the units, doing protraits from photos. I spent many pleasant hours at his house, watching him work, and doing some of my crazy cartoons for the kids in the area.

I don't know how many of you are aware of it but the Korean national anthem is a sad song. On and off for eight hundred years Korea's fate has been in the hands of someone else. The song tells about the dove that flew off and left them.

When the Japanese occupied Korea they started stripping Korea of all it's natural resources, timber, minerals, etc, til about all they had when I was there was rice farming.

Bill Powell
08-08-2005, 07:11
No I don't, scottauld, that was 1961. Plus, the guns stayed in Korea, passing along to the next guy. A few guys did something stupid with theirs and got them taken away. One guy tried to shoot the company commander's jeep full of holes, but those little Thunderbolts wouldn't penetrate the sheet metal, so he just made some dents. The derringer I had I traded for a Petri Pentax camera when I rotated.

Bill Powell
08-08-2005, 07:31
I don't know about the sand box, but in Korea there was enough new surplus stuff in the trash dumps that you never had to buy anything. I found the surplus dump site by Munsan-ni. It was under a water tower. Buried there were new Proto tools, M-1911's new in the box, Machetes. Again, when the military had a surplus of something they don't put it back in the system, they trashed it or dumped it.

Units were alloted their operating funds quarterly, to shop at the company store with. When the quarter ended, and the unit had a surplus, there was a buying frenzy, cause if you had a surplus at the end of the quarter they would deduct from your funds the same quarter next year. Since a unit was only alloted so much stuff, all the surplus went into the trash heap.

Bill Powell
08-08-2005, 08:40
Here's another little story for those of you who still think people are basically the sam the world over.

You ever go to a Korean funeral, in Korea?

The people are buried depending on their standing in the village. The rich and famous and the leaders are buried way up on top of the hill, high and dry. The lower your standing in the village, the further down the hill you were buried. You could sink so low that you are buried in the creek bottom, to be washed away by the first rain.

Let's say you are a hooker, or a criminal. I saw a hooker's funeral once. The whole procession was dressed in white, with the musicians, the professional mourners, and family members. The body was wrapped and placed on a flat slab, and the time I saw, the slab was place on a cart so the purifiers could get at her. They dance around with hardwood sticks about three feet long and do their bit to drive the evil spirits out of the body. What they felt was that she would not have been a slut if she had not been invaded by evil spirits. What they accomplished was to turn the body into a pile of jelly, cause every bone was broken many times over.

Of course, what I witnessed was the beliefs of a small village. Maybe the cities were different. I doubt it.

See you tonight.

Alex_Knight
08-08-2005, 11:33
Let's make this a sticky.


Hiya Bill.


Hope all is well with you. :) :) :)

Alex_Knight
08-08-2005, 11:34
Wow ! ! !

I typed Sticky and it happened ! ! !




;f ;f ;f

tous
08-08-2005, 11:36
Originally posted by Alex_Knight
Wow ! ! !

I typed Sticky and it happened ! ! !




;f ;f ;f

Behold! The power of cheese!

Patricia
08-08-2005, 11:38
I've been called cheesey, but never cheese. ;f ;f

Ever once in a while I have a good idea, and I think this qualifies. I know I'm gonna enjoy this thread very much and I think I'll have plenty of company. :) :)

Mrs. VR
08-08-2005, 11:40
VERY awesome! Cant wait to read more. After my nap;f

Bill Powell
08-08-2005, 12:12
We woke up one morning with a brand new company commander, one Lt. Surface, and airborne ranger who was an apple polishing, gung ho dummy who managed to piss people off above him and below him. Two days before we got him he was a heavy infantry company commander up near Camp Casey, on an exercise above the 38th parallel, at nightmare range. The 38th parallel is straight. The DMZ is S-shaped, starting south of the 38 th on the west side, and crossing to the north side about the dividing line between the first cav and the seventh army. I've north of the 38th parallel many times, and north of the DMZ a couple of times, at the meeting house.

We got him because he had his battery of 106 mm rocoilless rifles co-ordinated and ready to fire when an umpire shut him down. Well, in an officer's map case there is a training side and a TO&E side. When he reached into his map case he reached into the wrong pocket, got a TO&E map, and almost had the honor of starting the third world war. All of his 106mm recoilless rifles were aimed at a North Korean supply depot about three miles north of the DMZ. Two days later we had him. His military career was dead as Hogan's goat.

One of his favorite things, being he was a ranger and eater of bugs, was to sneak up on the guards at night and grab their weapon. It wasn't a totally brilliant plan, cause guard was walked there with live ammo. The guard paths could be a little spooky at night, and they were off in lonely parts of the camp. Well, one night there was a hell of a rain going on, and the pathways were as slippery as snot. This Lt. was sneaking down a path toward a guard when he lost his footing and started sliding down the path. The guard hears the noise and looks up to see this wailing, flailing creature coming at him, and give it a proper military upper butt thrust with his M-2 carbine, breaking the Lt.'s jaw in about three places.

While the Lt was in the hospital getting better the company exec came to him with court martial papers for him to sign. He turned into a nice guy and told the exec that if he court martialed the soldier, as soon as he felt better and got out of the hospital he was going to kick his ass. He said the kid was just doing his job.

okie
08-08-2005, 14:35
Wow these are some kinda stories. Thanks Bill;? ^c

Bill Powell
08-08-2005, 17:27
Anyone familiar with the M-47 tank, and the M-48. The main battle tank when I got to Korea was the M-47. In 1961 they made the change to M-48 tanks. You ever have a situation where not reading the directions well enough can make you a candidate for a Darwin award? An armored company was convoying their brand new M-48 tanks, when the convoy leader called for a halt. The lead tank stopped, and a crewman jumped off the back of the tank. The second tank stabbed the brake, he thought. He hit the gas and the tank lurched forward, pinning the guys head between the pointy nose of the one M-48 and the flat back of the other one. The nose of that tank caught him right at the hair line.

You know what the tank commander's main concern was? His main concern was the helmet the guy was wearing, and if he would get it back after the brains were cleaned out of it.

The one guy went home in a body bag, his troubles were over. The second one went home in a straight jacket, his life screwed up possibly for good, All because the commamder didn't have the time to read the instructions.

Alex_Knight
08-08-2005, 17:48
Holy Crap ! ! ! ! ! !

Mrs. VR
08-08-2005, 18:35
Originally posted by Bill Powell
The guard hears the noise and looks up to see this wailing, flailing creature coming at him, and give it a proper military upper butt thrust with his M-2 carbine, breaking the Lt.'s jaw in about three places.

~rf~rf~rf~rf I know that's not really funny, but that made me spit tea out my nose;f

Bill Powell
08-08-2005, 18:43
That depends on your perspective. I knew the officer involved, and I thought it was funny as hell..

DepChief
08-08-2005, 19:35
I smell a mini-series!

tous
08-08-2005, 20:28
Originally posted by DepChief
I smell a mini-series!

Tom Selleck as Bill?

Bill Powell
08-08-2005, 21:17
I posted a version of this, pretty much like this one, years ago.

After I left the post office and transferred to quartermaster, I got the occasional guard duty. I normally never got hit by the SLICKY-BOYS, the Korean sneak thieves, because I didn't walk my post from flank to flank. I'd disappear into the bushes and pop up somewhere else. We had already shot down one of the guard towers, playing with the M-2's on full auto. One day it just layed over, and we had to do our guard duty on the ground.

I was guarding a petroleum depot, high fence with concertina all around, three rolls on either side of the fence. I was walking along, at peace with the world, when I saw a stick. It was a stick about fourteen inches high, and it was not there an hour earlier. I got down on my knees by the stick and looked through an eighteen inch tunnel all the way through all that wire. I thought about it for a bit, moved the stick about ten feet to one side, and went looking for the slicky boy. When I saw him I started stomping my feet, yelling halt in two languages, and jacking a round into my carbine. He was doing pretty good til he heard that bolt cycle.

He was up in a flash, and doing his best impression of Jesse Owens best run, and looking for his stick. When he saw the stick he did a flying leap into what he thought was his bolt hole, but it was about ten feet away. By the time I freed him from the razor sharp barbed wire the MP's had showed up to cart him away. He never did do much besides whimper, but he spent a lot of time looking, and wondering what happened to his bolt hole.

G30Jack
08-09-2005, 08:13
;z ;z ;z ;z

Bill, you should write a book.

Patricia
08-09-2005, 09:35
^c

G33
08-09-2005, 09:39
;? ;?

GregG17
08-09-2005, 10:17
I love bills stories;z ;a ;a ;f ;f

Bill Powell
08-09-2005, 16:34
In the First Cav area, in Korea, in 1960, there were two bridges across the Imjin River, The was Freedom Bridge, built on the right of way of the old Pusan/Moscow railway. The other was Liberty Bridge. To get to Liberty Bridge you had to go way around to the east, a real pain in the butt.

Normally to get to one of the units by Liberty Bridge, I would go across Freedom Bridge and take a little one lane back road east to the units. Much shorter drive. On this little back road there was one little low water ford we crossed. However, this day when I started across the ford, the bottom was not there and my front bumper landed on the opposite bank. I was not going anywhere, which irritated the hell out of a convoy of semi's right behind me, cause they had to back up over half a mile to get off that road.

The whole country was flooding, and that little creek had suddenly gotten about three feet deep, and rocks were washing along with the current, slamming into my ankles. Anyway finally a wrecker came and lifted my bumper off the bank. I was back at my unit washing the mud off my truck when, up where I was stuck, there was a big explosion, and in a little while a wrecker came south towing a truck that the front end had been blown off of. He was the very next truck on that road after me.

Remember those rocks that were slamming into my ankles? They were mines, being washed out of a mine field by the flood. The explosion flung mines all out in the bushes, so that road had to be closed til that area could be swept of mines.

Bill Powell
08-09-2005, 21:43
Did I ever tell you about the Turks? The Turks were chock full of attitude, and had the meanness to back it up. For everyday wear they wore a sharpened carbine bayonet instead of the traditional combat knife. The combat knife, pull it out, you gotta draw blood before you re-sheath it, that knife. As a quartermaster company we supplied the English, the Turks, the Greeks, the Americans, and whoever else may wander in.

At the food warehouse we had a brand-new black kid, named Franklin, and he had to supply the Turks. On his way over, in Japan, he had bought a custom Zippo with a music box built into the bottom. While he was issuing rations to the turks, one of the turks signaled he wanted a light. Light, no problem, out comes the Zippo. Turk uses the lighter and signals he would like to have it. Franklin says no, and grabs the lighter back.

Pisses off the Turk, out comes the bayonet. Franklin is holding one of the vegetable crate slats, a 2X2 about two feet long. Up comes the bayonet, and SMACK, goes that slat up side the Turks head. Every time the turk moved, he got hit, til his buddies had to help him back on the truck. After the Turks leave, someone tells Franklin how bad those Turks are supposed to be. SCARED THE LIVING CRAP OUT OF HIM. He would not go out on pass for fear of a vendatta.

Next week, here come the Turks, and the knife man tells Franklin, through an interpreter, that he had just impressed the hell out of him with that stick, and they should be buddies.

Alex_Knight
08-10-2005, 09:46
Great story Bill. :)

Bill Powell
08-10-2005, 16:03
Thanks Alex. Sometimes it was fun, sometimes not. One thing it always was was interesting.

GregG17
08-10-2005, 16:24
Bill, I love your stories reminds me of my dads in a way...

Miss Maggie
08-10-2005, 17:18
I'm enjoying reading your stories. Thanks.

Bill Powell
08-10-2005, 20:48
Miss Maggie, I don't know if you are aware of it but you, personally, contributed to the marksmanship training of the American serviceman. When a soldier, or whatever, is qualifying there is a scoring system to grade your accuracy with you personal weapon.

On the known distance range, the target is graded in rings. There is the bull's eye, dead center. Then, depending on the target, it will radiate out to smaller scores. Here's where your contribution comes in.

If the target shows no hit at all, if you shot a clean miss, a flag was waved. The flag was known as MAGGIE'S DRAWERS. So, be proud that you have done your part to protect our country.

Why they chose your drawers, I have no idea.

G33
08-10-2005, 23:10
Mr. Bill--OAF National Treasure.;f

Miss Maggie
08-11-2005, 06:47
Originally posted by Bill Powell
Miss Maggie, I don't know if you are aware of it but you, personally, contributed to the marksmanship training of the American serviceman. When a soldier, or whatever, is qualifying there is a scoring system to grade your accuracy with you personal weapon.

On the known distance range, the target is graded in rings. There is the bull's eye, dead center. Then, depending on the target, it will radiate out to smaller scores. Here's where your contribution comes in.

If the target shows no hit at all, if you shot a clean miss, a flag was waved. The flag was known as MAGGIE'S DRAWERS. So, be proud that you have done your part to protect our country.

Why they chose your drawers, I have no idea.

Will wonders ever cease?;f ;f ;f ;f

vote Republican
08-11-2005, 07:48
Originally posted by Bill Powell

Remember those rocks that were slamming into my ankles? They were mines, being washed out of a mine field by the flood. The explosion flung mines all out in the bushes, so that road had to be closed til that area could be swept of mines.

;P ;P

Talk about living on bonus time...

Bill Powell
08-11-2005, 08:04
Vote Republican, in that part of Korea the beaten path was your friend. Division wide we lost one or two guys a month as a result of their stepping off the path into the bushes. That part of Korea was just a vast, uncharted mine field. One big effort in 1961 was locating all the old mines, destroying them, re-sowing, and re-mapping the fields. The hardest ones to work with were the wooden box mines. The normal detection methods didn't work with them.

I was parked what I considered way to close to an M-48 tank when it hit one of those mines while fording a creek. It had washed down from somewhere else. For anti-tank purposes they would stack the wooden mines on top of each other. Since it was just one mine all it did was knock a fender loose and break a track.

I don't know why those mines that were hitting me did not explode. They were hitting me, my truck, and they were slamming into each other. Just lucky that day.

freepatriot
08-11-2005, 08:54
Sounds to me like you had more than a few lucky days in order to come back in one piece, my friend.

<--glad for that. ;?

Bill Powell
08-11-2005, 16:41
Scott, any time you have eighteen/nineteen year old guys in total charge of stuff that goes bang, there is the chance for an accident. But for me, the biggest danger to me was my own driving. My truck had a Stewart-Warner 60MPH speedometer. My truck would go past the 60, all the way around to the little peg at zero. I had taken the restrictor plate out of the carburetor, cut the diaphram out of the carb governor, and turned the block governer out ten turns.

One day I was going from Munsan-ni, north to Panmun-Jan, when I came up behind a Korean contract truck, hauling mess haul provisions. On top of the pile was chocolate milk. I made it clear that I wanted chocolate milk, and he shrugged cause he didn't how to get it to me. The road was a little lane and a half dirt road, with ditches on both sides. No problem. I jumped the ditch to the left and passed the truck with my right tires on the road and the left tires out in the boonies. I was doing about fifty when I passed the truck, and when my door was even with the rear of his truck, he tossed my goodies into my truck through the door window. got a call, more later.

Bill Powell
08-11-2005, 18:14
The prevailing speed limit in that part of Korea was 20 MPH, but it was universally ignored. Running along side the DMZ was a road from the 9th Cav and the 8th and 12th cav areas, a distance of ten miles or so. I used to wonder what the north Koreans thought about my covering that distance in seven or eight minutes. You weren't right on the DMZ cause there is like a mile buffer zone on either side, kind of a no man's land.

Anyway this is still the same trip as the preceding post. We had been wanting to have a BBQ, and we were looking for something to cook. As I was driving along the DMZ one of those little red asian deer jumped up and started running along side the road. I fetched out my once barreled carbine, with the 30 rd mag, and started trying to get a sight picture on that animal. About the time I was ready to fire, I heard a boom way bigger than my carbine could make. Damned deer had stepped on a mine. I thought about for a bit, drove back to the warehouse, and stole three or four steaks.

The third time I tried to kill myself on that same trip was after I had crossed Freedom bridge, and was heading back south to Munsan-ni. I was reminded by nature that I had drunk lots of coffee and other liquids that day and needed to get rid of some of it. I backed off to about thirty five, pulled the throttle to that speed, opened the door and stood on the running board. As I was feeling the relief, I hit a big bump and fell off the running board, and was hanging onto the steering wheel and the other arm over the top of the door. I finished what I was doing, wetting both my legs in the process. It took me half a mile to get back into that truck.

Ever since then I have subscribed to "IF YOU'RE GONNA BE STUPID, IT'S GOOD TO BE LUCKY."

lcarreau
08-11-2005, 18:58
OMG, that was funny. Sounds like something a young, foolish kid would do, but funny.

-Lonnie

Bill Powell
08-11-2005, 21:38
The only difference between funny and tragic is getting away with it without breaking something.

One day I was supporting an infantry brigade with fuel services. I had set up in a rock quarry. It was a smallish quarry, with a babbling brook, and seclusion. There was a narrow driveway going into the quarry, through granite walls.

Toward the end of the day I was heading back to my hide-a-way when an M-113 armored personnel carrier started chasing me, wanting fuel. Every time I went through that pass the walls slapped my mirrors back against the side of the truck. The two of us start through that pass at about thirty mille per hour. Well, an M-113 is six or eight inches wider than my truck. Did you know one of those things will stop from 30 MPH in about six inches?

Tough on the driver's face, but the ring around the hatch is padded.

lcarreau
08-11-2005, 22:34
Bill,

I don't mean to hijack your thread, but this reminds me of a story I would like to share.

As a kid, my parents were divorced and lived on opposite coasts. I lived with Dad on the west coast and got a few chances to spend summers with Mom. Mom lived out in the country in NH and was always fearful I was gonna turn into a sissy city kid. Well, one Summer, when I was 18, I helped her with some cement work on the property. We pulled this huge rock out of the gound by attaching it with chains to the front loader of a john deer tractor. After we got it out of the ground, we wrapped it up good in the chain and she asked me to take it across this field and drop it at the edge of the property.

Well, the rock was on the right front of the front loader and I drove it down this slope at the wrong angle. I felt the tractor start to tip over and I stood up to try to bail out on the left side, but my foot got tangled up in the levers. I knew I was gonna die, but while still standing, I turned the wheel into the direction of the tip and saved it.

I saw my mother running out to me, and expected a good butt chewing, but from where she stood, she saw me stand up and lean to the left to counter balance the weight. She told me she was shocked I had the guts to stick it out and bragged about the incident to the neighbors. It's a memory she took to the grave. When I was in my 20s, I thought about setting the record straight on that incident, because I felt like I did not need it to prove myself anymore, but she seemed so fond of the memory that I let it go. I am glad I did.

Not a war story, but I thought it fit the tone of the thread.

I now yield the thread back to thte namesake. Carry on.

-Lonnie

Bill Powell
08-12-2005, 06:51
Lonnie, that is not a hi-jack, that is a cool story. Sometimes people thinking you are really clever is just as good as actually being that clever. It your case justice was better served by letting her have her illusions.

I think this got started because I had been making some long winded posts, talking about the good/bad old days. Anyone who wants to jump in is more than welcome. In fact, I'm a little surprised that more people haven't posted a memory here.

Mrs. VR
08-12-2005, 10:23
Bill, you most surely have a Guardian Angel!;f

Eric
08-12-2005, 12:03
About ten years ago, Bill was customizing an old Volkswagon Squareback. The interior of the car was stripped out and he was converting the front doors to suicide doors. For those of you that are not into old/custom cars, suicide doors are hinged at the rear and open at the front. He had been using a torch and he had thoroughly soaked the car around the area he was working, to prevent a fire. He was also using an arc welder and the stinger was lying in the passenger side floorboard. When he got done with the torch, he sat down on the floorboard, right on the arc welder's stinger! Well, he knew right away that something wasn't right.;f That stinger was burning a hole in his butt and every place he grabbed to pull himself out of that car had another jolt of electricity waiting for him. He looked like a cat on a hot tin roof getting out of that car.

My brother Jim and I were laughing our asses off by this time. That initially added insult to injury for my Dad, but after his butt cooled off, he saw the humor in the situation too. That stinger burned a hole right through his pants.;f

The moral of this story is, "Don't set on stingers. They hurt."

I only thought of this because I did a search for a picture earlier and found a picture of an old VW Notchback. Bill has done a lot of work on old VW's. Everything from stock restoration work, to custom stuff like the Squareback above, to work on some of the damnedest Art Cars I have ever seen. Eric

G30Jack
08-12-2005, 12:23
;z ;z ;z ;z ;z ;z

Bill Powell
08-12-2005, 14:09
Eric, that was just wrong. After convincing a lot of these people that I'm inflappable, you've exposed me as someone prone to sitting on stingey thingies. I remember that trip out of that car. You know that car got finished?

Mrs. VR
08-12-2005, 16:41
I dont know what half that stuff means, but I can just picture poor Bill trying to get out of that car!;P


;f

Miss Maggie
08-12-2005, 16:57
Those "stringy thingies" are a mystery to me.

Eric
08-12-2005, 17:03
Originally posted by Bill Powell
Eric, that was just wrong. After convincing a lot of these people that I'm inflappable, you've exposed me as someone prone to sitting on stingey thingies. I remember that trip out of that car. You know that car got finished?

I'm sorry, but I couldn't resist. I saw a picture of an old Notchback earlier and it got me thinking of that story. While we are on the subject of cars, why don't you tell everyone about Jim and the aluminum magnet? Eric

Eric
08-12-2005, 17:14
Originally posted by Mrs. VR
I dont know what half that stuff means, but I can just picture poor Bill trying to get out of that car!;P


;f

An arc welder is a pretty simple beast. It uses electricity to melt metal and fuse it together. You have a big ground clamp that is connected to the welder with a large cable, that you clip onto the car's body or frame somewhere it can get a good ground. You also have something which is usually called the stinger, which is a handle with a clamp that you use to hold an electrode. The stinger has a power cable running to it. The elctrode in the stinger is what actually transfers the electricity to the part being welded. The elctrode arcs to the part being welded because the part is grounded with the ground clamp and a tremendous amount of heat is generated. The arc melts the part that is being welded, near the tip of the elctrode, and the electrode itself. The melted metal from the elctrode becomes filler material for the weld. There is more to the process than this, but it will give you a rough idea of how this process works.

When Bill set on the arc welder's stinger, he actually sat on the tip of the electrode. His body weight forced the electrode down into contact with the metal floorboard of the car, where it arced and got very hot, very quickly. That was uncomfortable enough, but every time Bill tried to grab another part of the car to pull himself out, his contact with the metal body of the car gave the electricity flowing through that arc welder's electrode another path to ground and he got a shock. The point under his butt was a much better path to ground than through his body to where he was touching, so he didn't get a very large jolt, but it was surely enough to be uncomfortable as well. An arc welder wields much more than enough electricity to kill someone, but due to the circumstances of this incident, Bill was never in danger of more than a burn, a few jolts and more than a few guffaws, all of which he accepted like a man.;f Eric

Bill Powell
08-12-2005, 17:18
Miss Maggie, you read that wrong, it was stingey thingy, as in something that will sting your butt if you are dumb enough to sit on it. That day I was that dumb person. It would be kind of like you cutting the cord off your lamp, stripping the insulation away, plugging it in, and sitting on it.

While we're on the subject of dumb things, in Korea we decided it would be fun to have fire shoot out of our mouths. You have a lighter handy in one hand, take a big mouthful of lighter fluid, light the lighter in front of your face, and blow the stream of lighter fluid through it. You can blow fire up to three feet. The trick was getting the stream to stop without burning back to your lips. One guy set one wall of a bar on fire, but it was put out quick. If you want to see Papa-san drop his A-frame and run, stare at him a moment, and then shoot a three foot flame at him.

What brought it a halt was one Steve Kiger. He hiccuped in mid-blow, and interupted the air flow, allowing the fire ball to wash back into his face. His injuries were not serious, but they were painful.

Mrs. VR
08-12-2005, 17:25
Eric, thanks for the explanation! I just have one question. Did Bill end up with curly hair after that experience? ;f


oh, and Bill, dont feel bad, I've posted this before, but one time I stuck my finger in a lamp socket to show a customer the difference between a one way and a three way socket. It was plugged in. They didnt buy anything. ;f

Mrs. VR
08-12-2005, 17:25
Originally posted by Bill Powell
What brought it a halt was one Steve Kiger. He hiccuped in mid-blow, and interupted the air flow, allowing the fire ball to wash back into his face. His injuries were not serious, but they were painful. ;P ~rf

Jack Straight
08-12-2005, 17:52
Originally posted by Bill Powell
...we decided it would be fun to have fire shoot out of our mouths.

Hey fellas, watch this!

- Famous last words of young men.

lcarreau
08-12-2005, 17:54
In the very early 90s, I was working for a defense contractor that made these multi million dollar Cockpit trainers for a particular Air Force plane. One of my jobs was running cable for dumb terminals. Well late one day, I was told that a terminal had to be set up on this one side of the lab where all the expensive gear was and the nearest terminal server was on the opposite end. To make life more interesting, the celings were extra tall. I had to use a 12 foot ladder. In the process of running the cable I had to set up the ladder very close to one of these hugely expensive mock cockpits that we made. The cable was hanging out of the ceiling directly above it and it was just out of reach. I knew these machines were sacred, but I stepped on it anyways so I could reach the cable. Fortunately, the equipment was well built and easily supported my weight. I got the cable run and set up the dumb terminal and all was well till a few days later. The big cheese that ran the whole program, called everyone into a giant conference room (over 150 people.) It seems he found a foot print on one of the trainers and he was mad as hell.

Needless to say, I was sure I was gonna get caught and fired. In fact, I had on the very same shoes. Everyone got a very stern warning about maintaining appearances for the Air force and we were sent on our way. I was alone when I ran the cable, and no one made the connection. I was happy to get home with my job, but I never wore those shoes again.

-Lonnie

Miss Maggie
08-12-2005, 18:41
Originally posted by Bill Powell
Miss Maggie, you read that wrong, it was stingey thingy, as in something that will sting your butt if you are dumb enough to sit on it. That day I was that dumb person. It would be kind of like you cutting the cord off your lamp, stripping the insulation away, plugging it in, and sitting on it.

While we're on the subject of dumb things, in Korea we decided it would be fun to have fire shoot out of our mouths. You have a lighter handy in one hand, take a big mouthful of lighter fluid, light the lighter in front of your face, and blow the stream of lighter fluid through it. You can blow fire up to three feet. The trick was getting the stream to stop without burning back to your lips. One guy set one wall of a bar on fire, but it was put out quick. If you want to see Papa-san drop his A-frame and run, stare at him a moment, and then shoot a three foot flame at him.

What brought it a halt was one Steve Kiger. He hiccuped in mid-blow, and interupted the air flow, allowing the fire ball to wash back into his face. His injuries were not serious, but they were painful.

When we were little, Daddy had the cows fenced in with an electric fence. The fence didn't shock all time, but at close, pulsating intervals. We all loved to get a long green switch, remove the leaves, and stick it to the fence. We's get somewhat of a jolt, but not enough to really hurt. Then one of us found out if you did this and touched another person, that person got the worst of the electric jolt. When two or three of us touched the same sibling at the same time, look out. I don't know if it really shocked harder or if we thought it did, but it led to quite a rucus. Mama used a whole lot of switches herself over this.

That fire-breathing dragon fire trick sounds scary. My cousin used to do this with a can of hair spray. He'd spray it out and then set the flame afire to make a torch. He'd aim at us younger kids and scare us to death. About the time we thought we were burned, the flame burned out.

Bill Powell
08-12-2005, 20:55
I think the story Eric referred to was about a guy who wanted to buy a car we had in the museum. It was a 1938 Cadillac roadster, with custom coach work by Brunn. Custom coach work is taking a production car and creating someone that Cadillac never intended the car to be. they cut the steel body off the car, and re-bodied it in aluminum. To see a similar body, look up Packard Darrin in Google.

A guy named Mike--something had come over one evening to look at the car. He requested a magnet to map the bondo. You use like a refrigerator magnet on a strap of some kind, and you can map bondo like you had X-ray vision. Eric's brother gave the guy a magnet, and he went out ot check the car. He came back in a few minutes later mumbling about the fact that the car must be all bondo. I said, "Jim, dammit, you gave him the wrong magnet, he needs the aluminum magnet." Jim handed him a magnet with a different color strap, and he went out the door. About three or four paces out the door foul obsceneties started drifting back through the door, something about he didn't like being made a fool of.

By the time the guy came back in to throw the magnet at us, he had cooled off.

vote Republican
08-13-2005, 05:39
Hey Eric, this is Sharon after your arc welder explanation:

;9

;f

Nestor
08-13-2005, 12:29
Originally posted by vote Republican
Hey Eric, this is Sharon after your arc welder explanation:

;9

;f

She lost her hair?

Bill Powell
08-13-2005, 16:05
Hello Adam, Hug Monika and Zosia.

Sometimes your're reminded that things can be dangerous wherever you are. In early 1961 I was in the hospital, a mash unit, for a month. Military hospitals are not big on private rooms, or even privacy curtains. Directly across from my bed was a young Korean boy, about twenty years old. Watching him every day was depressing, and at the same time testimony to the the amount of punishment the human body can take.

He had fallen between the track and track frame on a D-8 Caterpillar. That is only about a two inch crack. It had ground his leggs off at the hip, and pulled the leg bones from the hip sockets. The lowest part of his body were his testicles. Every day day the doctors were draining that area, and trying to get four inch wide grafts to grow. He could not stand the pain of being covered, so he just lay there in plain sight. I don't know if he survived, but I kind of like to think he did not. Korea is no place for someone that handicapped.


For some reason circumcision was the rage about that time. there were three guy in who had been nipped. The head nurse, Miss Fish, told one of the younger nurses how to change the dressing. Her name was Captain Trout, but Miss Fish sounded better. The average twenty year old when a young lady starts playing with his pee-pee, for whatever reason, will start feeling frisky. The head nurse told the young one how to use the smelling salts, and if that failed how to tap the little guy with her scissors. Sure enough, when she started working with the bandage, The little guy developed a mind of its own. Allowed to continue to the maximum, the stitches will be ripped loose. She starts to panic. First the ammonia, no help. Sharp little with her suture scissors, no help, the stitches are starting to stretch. A little moan from the nurse, and Whap, with her big scissors. From the bed comes. "AAAAARRRRRGGGGGGHHHHH." Stitches didn't get pulled loose, they got knocked loose.

Mrs. VR
08-14-2005, 07:20
;P ;z ;z ;z ;z

Mrs. VR
08-14-2005, 07:20
oh, and I understood Eric's post PERFECTLY!;n

Bill Powell
08-14-2005, 07:33
Mrs VR, Jay Leno said last evening that scientists have discovered a mutated gene in red heads that makes them less sensitive to pain than other folks. You think they're right?

Nestor
08-14-2005, 11:50
Originally posted by Bill Powell
One more, and then I will go back into fluff mode. I was driving through a village one day, and in the crowd lining the road was a little blonde girl, half Korean, half american soldier. I was driving a five ton tractor, pulling a 5000 gallon fuel tank. The truck was an M-52 for those of you familiar with military vehicles.

I suddenly felt the need to stop the truck, get out, and check out my surroundings. As I rounded the front of the truck, there on the ground and just getting up from two feet in front of my drive axle, was that little blonde girl. Had I not stopped exactly when I did, I would have run over that little girl. She had been pushed into the road by her mother or some other member of the family.

It was tough making a living in Korea, especially for someone with a little half breed girl. Under my truck, and dead, the little girl was worth about twenty five thousand dollars to her mother. That was about the going rate for a dead family member.

Hello Bill, thank you. I thought I would just read this thread, but I have to say that this post touched me deeply...

Bill Powell
08-14-2005, 14:51
Hello Adam, sometimes it was fun, sometimes it was not. Little kids of mixed heritage had a really rough time in Korea. They were outcasts from both their races and/or nationalities.

People in a western society, no matter how bad they have it, are better off than the people in a lot of the countries I've seen.

lcarreau
08-14-2005, 20:44
My grand parents were married for more than 50 years, and for a about a 4 year period of time, while my father rebuilt his life we lived with them, starting from the time I was about 7. It was clear that my grandmother was in charge and there was no reason to think that was not ok. Later, My dad got his own place, not too far away, but we still visted often. I got to notice a certain tension when my grandparents argued over small things. In my early teen years, they had a real blowout, and she ended the argument by calling him a gambler. It very obviously put him in his place and the argument ended right there.

I later found out that in the early 30s, before they had any kids, my grandfather got so far into gambling debt, that some very bad men came and took everything they owned in their home. From that day forward, my grandfather never placed a bet on anything, but 50 years + later he lived with the stigma. He did not even like to hear my brothers and I argue with the line "wanna bet?".

I am not sure what the moral to this story should be, so I will let you draw your own conclusion.

-Lonnie

Bill Powell
08-14-2005, 21:13
I think people would be surprised at the number of sweet little old couples with a past that is an embarrassment to them. I know one couple that were carnies when they were young, and mean as snakes. They had kids and wanted something better for the kids than the sheriff running them out of every town they went to. They hate for people to know what they were. I don't know why, they were nice people when I knew them.

Why should a story have a moral? They were lucky, the lesson took, and held, all those years.

Mrs. VR
08-14-2005, 21:21
Originally posted by Bill Powell
Mrs VR, Jay Leno said last evening that scientists have discovered a mutated gene in red heads that makes them less sensitive to pain than other folks. You think they're right? yep, im a mutant alright!;f

lcarreau
08-14-2005, 21:26
Bill,

As a follow up to that thread, My ex was a a refugee from Vietnam, whose father had spent 10 years in a prison camp for his role in losing the war. It seems that my ex mother in law was against him doing that from the start. When they got into it, she brought that up. I guess 10 years of near dying did not pay off that mistake. Whenever I see a couple get into it over stupid stuff, these memories keep me grounded. It also makes me keep in mind that gals don't forget stuff. ;f

-Lonnie

lcarreau
08-14-2005, 22:15
In high school, due to my Dad's job, I would get there quite early and leave late. I volunteered to raise thte flag in front of the school each morning and take it down in the afternoon, getting a friend to help me fold it. I never really took this seriously until one morning, a friend showed up earlier than normal as I was about to attach the flag to the ropes. He started to grab the ropes and yank on it in an attempt to prevent me from doing it. He was much smaller than me, and I did not take this seriously. In fact, I considered this a challange. I pushed him far away from the pole and tried to run back. to hitch the flag to the rope. This went one for about 10 minutes. We were both laughing and sucking air.

Then, from the apartment complex across the street, this shirtless guy marches directly at us, and he is mad as hell. When he gets very close, I can see he has a very deep hole in his left abdomen. It looked like a very deep and wide belly button, obviously a healed wound

Me and my friend froze out of fear.

This guy gets up in my friends face about what the flag means to him and his friends that did not make it back from NAM. He further goes on to talk about what it means to him each morning he sees that flag come up, gestering to me. All this was yelled very loud in very public area.

Before he was done, there were faculty, students and folks walking by around to hear the end of his speech, but no one said a word. After he left, I raised the flag at that moment with a new sense of pride and shame.

-Lonnie

Bill Powell
08-15-2005, 07:04
Schools don't teach respect for the flag anymore, not for a long time. A majority of families don't teach it, simply because they don't think to.

I think it's neat what happened to you and your friend. It sounds like you got the message, whether he did or not. If maybe maybe one other person in the audience got the message, that guy with the hole in his belly done good.

G30Jack
08-15-2005, 07:46
My Uncle Charlie Coleman was an interesting guy. First time I met him I was about 11 or 12. I had another Aunt & Uncle that lived in New Smyrna Beach and we would see them quite often because we lived in Sanford, about 45 minutes away. We all got together to go out to dinner at a seafood place called Norwoods. As we were all getting there, my Cousin locked the keys in her Toyota wagon. Uncle Charlie gets out his pen knife and goes to work on the lock in the back hatch. In about 2 minutes he pops the hatch and we get the keys out. He closes his knife and says, "Those GD Japs will never make a lock I can't open". I was confused. My Dad pulled me aside and told me Charlie was a Bataan Death March survivor.

I just wish I could have heard more of his stories. He passed away about 13 years ago.;?

Bill Powell
08-15-2005, 08:24
That reminds me, again, of a character I would liked to have talked to more. My good friend, Jimmy Jones, lived right across the street from us with his family. They shared their home with my friend's 85 year old grandfather.

The Left Handed Gun, with Paul Newman, was first shown as a TV play, about 1955. It later, about 1958, became the movie, also with Paul Newman.

My friend and were watching the TV play, and eating it up, when his grandfather wanted to know who that snappy dresser (Paul Newman) was. We told him it was Billy The Kid. He started laughing at Newman's portrayal of Bonny, went over to his bed and pulled out his box of personal goodies. His first question, a question I did not consider til recently, was why are they showing him left handed? All these years I knew Billy the Kid was right handed, and didn't even know it. That was the first time I saw that famous newspaper photo. He also said Bonny was just a punk kid caught up in something he didn't know how to handle, Plus had a juvenile joy in the noteriety. I asked him how he knew all this and he said, "Hell, I knew the bastard, I knew Garrett, and most everyone else involved."

So you see, I knew Billy the Kid personally, once removed. I knew someone personally who had known him personally. Cool, aint it.



I worked with a guy who was captured on One of the islands very early in the war. He had a fairly easy time of it as a POW. Almost immediately he was shipped to the Japanese main island wher he lived, loosely supervised, and was farmed out when someone needed day labor. He did say that when the bombing became more intense, his captor kept him under pretty close arrest, cause the mood of the people was getting pretty ugly toward him. It was his friends bombing them.

freepatriot
08-15-2005, 08:34
Originally posted by Mrs. VR
...one time I stuck my finger in a lamp socket to show a customer the difference between a one way and a three way socket. It was plugged in. They didnt buy anything. ;f



I always wondered why that lamp store was so empty, when I walked past it on my way to get a Calzone.

;f;f;f

freepatriot
08-15-2005, 08:47
Originally posted by Bill Powell
So you see, I knew Billy the Kid personally, once removed. I knew someone personally who had known him personally. Cool, aint it



Well, now I know Billy the Kid personally, twice removed.

;?

The books I read say that BTK was a punk and Pat Garrett was the hero.

Bill Powell
08-15-2005, 15:22
According to my friend's grandfather there weren't many good guys and bad guys, just winners and losers. We'll never know what Garrett was offered gun down his old buddy. It was two factions at war, each serving their own interests.


And the relationship numbers just go on and own, up to about twentieth removed.

Mrs. VR
08-15-2005, 18:11
Originally posted by scottauld
I always wondered why that lamp store was so empty, when I walked past it on my way to get a Calzone.

;f;f;f ;n;n;n;n;n

iimagine
08-15-2005, 19:21
Originally posted by scottauld
I always wondered why that lamp store was so empty, when I walked past it on my way to get a Calzone.;f;f;f BBBZZZZZTTTTTT! POUF! New Hairdo.
iimagine

Mrs. VR
08-15-2005, 20:55
Originally posted by iimagine
BBBZZZZZTTTTTT! POUF! New Hairdo.
iimagine it was already naturally curly!;n

Bill Powell
08-15-2005, 22:56
Kimpo Air Force Base is also the location of the civilian airport, or was in 1960. The international terminal was a two story building about the size of a safeway store. On one mail trip to Kimpo I rans into a hell of a mess. Korea was having the best rice crop they'd had in fifty years. The government invited some Japanese agrcultural experts over to check it out. Well, after the forty five year occupation by the Japanese, that was not a popular decision. It was kind of like inviting a bunch of Sioux to Mrs. Custer's house to check out her garden. I showed up at Kimpo right in the middle of about 275,000 Korean students, protesting the hell out of the visit. The Japanese visitors never got off the plane. A lot of those students didn't like us much, either, so I had to run a bit of a gauntlet.

About that same time General Park had his little military coup. I would drive through Seoul with tanks, or sand bagged machine gun emplacements on every corner. We were restricted to our compound for the duration of the revolution/coup, about a month. It created terrible hardship in certain parts of he local economy. Rondevous through the fence became very negotiable. It was during this time that the US decided to change the Military Payment certificates, to take a lot of currency out of the local economy by rendering it useless. There were Koreans at the fence with thousands of dollars, trying to get soldiers to change it for them, but we were limited by rank as to how much we could exchange.

Oh, the rice crop. Monsoon season hit early, and they lost about sixty percent of the crop.

lcarreau
08-15-2005, 23:19
Mr. Powell,

The historic perspective you give on this timeframe is priceless. The only perspective I have is from the MASH series.

I wold be very interested to hear you contrast/compare the middle east wars of late to the asian wars of your era.

-Lonnie

freepatriot
08-16-2005, 10:16
Originally posted by lcarreau
Mr. Powell,

The historic perspective you give on this timeframe is priceless. The only perspective I have is from the MASH series.

I wold be very interested to hear you contrast/compare the middle east wars of late to the asian wars of your era.

-Lonnie


I think that a lof ot the M*A*S*H* perspective was anti-Vietnam Hollywood stuff disguised as War-Is-Hell drama. Just my opinion though.

lcarreau
08-16-2005, 10:21
Originally posted by scottauld
I think that a lof ot the M*A*S*H* perspective was anti-Vietnam Hollywood stuff disguised as War-Is-Hell drama. Just my opinion though.

True, but the setting was in Korea. No one talked about the Korean war when I grew up.

-Lonnie

Bill Powell
08-16-2005, 10:23
Damn guy, that's hard. Korea was viewed as one one of the first non-righteous wars, fought because of a political friendship and protection agreement. It was suppose to have been a U.N. thing, but it was like 95% US, and five per cent the rest of them. Korea does not lend itself well to a mechanized war. Muddy rice paddies in the summer and frozen solid in the winter. A few areas you could, but not where I was. At least the Koreans tried to help us help them. It was a politically run war but not as bad as Viet Nam.

Viet Nam, viewed as major non-righteous war, with many political axes to grind, and no help from the people you thought you were trying to help. Remember the line from Princess Bride, one of the three basic truths is, NEVER GET INVOLVED IN A LAND WAR IN ASIA.

The average peasant is no better off, or worse off, than before the war.


The one I have a problem with is both wars in Iraq. The first one they stopped too soon, but that came at the request of our allies. The current one should have been viewed as purely a punitive war, get that bastard out of power, and let the people run their own country. Now they're trying to ram democracy down the throats of people who don't even understand the concept.

Or better yet, leave him in power, and tell him, "Here's the deal, you're in charge so you'd better keep a short leash on your rag head buddies. If we lose a building, your fault, their fault, you lose a town." He does understand power.

We lost a couple of hundred people in the war. What's the count now, a couple of thousand combat related deaths?

Iraq is one of the few places where you can have magnificent tank battles, with lots of room to move about, like the steppes, in Russia. The US central plains has that kind of ideal tank battlefield.

This evening I will re-read these ramblings, and try to put them in some kind of order.

Here's where Viet Nam and Iraq have similarities. In the first Iraq war, after they were soundly thrashed we stopped. The second one we're fighting in their homes, and they have the advantage. Here's my feeling. Keep the people looking for Osama, bring the ones in Iraq home. Let them make their own government, and let them know the consequences of sending terrorists over here.

I'm sorry it's so dis-jointed now, you snuck that question in on me.

freepatriot
08-16-2005, 11:40
Very good answers to very tough questions, Bill.

World War One was also a result of political friendship and protection agreements, but by the time we got into it three years later it had turned it into a Kill-The-Hun war. I guess all those sub attacks would do that.

Not to take away from what you said at all, sir. You just made me think of another war of alliances, that's all.

freepatriot
08-16-2005, 14:20
Originally posted by Bill Powell
We lost a couple of hundred people in the war. What's the count now, a couple of thousand combat related deaths?


<pre>
American Deaths In Combat
1852 1472
</pre>


I do always hate the way we hear the current casualty count ... FOR OUR SIDE, but we never hear how many on the other side have been killed.

Best estimates are 25,000 "insurgents" (read: rag heads in street with RPG launcher or AK-variant)

;?

lcarreau
08-16-2005, 14:55
I have always found it interesting that throughought history, The best armies in the world at the time are able to get thwarted by folks they deem barbaric. The Romans are a good example as are the British being defeated by the colonists using "terrorist" tactics. Once we assumed the top dog role in the world (post WW2), We strarted getting held at bay by much smaller and weaker countries (North korea, Cuba, North Vietnam, Iraq...etc). It just seems like something that happens to every top dog nation through history. I just hope we can avoid the part that comes immediately after that.

-Lonnie

Bill Powell
08-16-2005, 16:07
Even the Russians, after years in afghanistan, said just piss on it, lets go home. When an outsider is fighting someone in their own home, they cannot win.

In Borneo, I think, somewhere in that area, the Japanese lost an entire infantry platoon, to a bunch of aboriginies with blow guns. The Japanese were outsiders, playing in someone else's jungle.

In Iraq, we're the outsiders, playing in someone else's jungle. They know all the hidey holes. One cure, call in an arc light raid, four planes wide, and the entire length of the road that's causing the most trouble.

Look how long it took the Italians to subdue the Etheopians. The first time a lot of the etheopian soldiers saw a machine gun it was shooting at them. Of course, that ws the Italians. It's hard for them to get serious about war.

Hell, look at Geromino, and how many soldiers he tied up, with about thirty people.

lcarreau
08-16-2005, 18:07
All good points Bill. Even with all the technology in the world, it's tough to beat a determined enemy on his own turf.

-Lonnie

Bill Powell
08-16-2005, 18:32
Look at Viet Nam. We won almost every battle, and still lost the war. The final guys had to run like thieves in the night. Any combat leader, when asked how long it would take to score a decisive military victory, answered about a week.

My first cousin had the perfect solution, the only way to tell that you've gotten all the bad guys. Round up every friendly in the country, every one, and put them on boats a few miles out to sea. Then, go in with nukes and turn the country into a parking lot. Then, send frogmen out and have them sink the boats. That is the only way to be sure.

Our leaders still have the naive belief that every one on earth thinks just like we do.

lcarreau
08-16-2005, 18:54
Originally posted by Bill Powell
Look at Viet Nam. We won almost every battle, and still lost the war. The final guys had to run like thieves in the night. Any combat leader, when asked how long it would take to score a decisive military victory, answered about a week.

My first cousin had the perfect solution, the only way to tell that you've gotten all the bad guys. Round up every friendly in the country, every one, and put them on boats a few miles out to sea. Then, go in with nukes and turn the country into a parking lot. Then, send frogmen out and have them sink the boats. That is the only way to be sure.

Our leaders still have the naive belief that every one on earth thinks just like we do.

The Tet offensive was a huge Military loss to the VC if you do the math on death caualties on both sides, but it turned out to be a major political victory in that it killed what will we had to stick it out. I am not sure igf they got lucky or their leadership was as great as they think to this day.

-Lonnie

lcarreau
08-16-2005, 20:47
The French took a way worse defeat in Vietnm.

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/report/1991/BHD.htm


They took there "A" game and got their asses handed to them by a force that used bicycles to haul guns to the fight.

-Lonnie

Bill Powell
08-16-2005, 21:19
The French actually had investments to protect there, but weren't quite able to do it. But then, they're the French.

We went over there as round eyed innocents, fully intending to, in digitspaw's words, FETCH 'EM UP BY THE SCRUFF OF THE NECK AND GIVE 'EM A GOOD SHAKIN'. We'd slap 'em so hard we'd knock them right out of the phone book. Didn't work that way. How do you beat someone who runs around in the woods picking up bird crap as one of the ingredients in his homemade gun powder?

Bill Powell
08-16-2005, 22:27
Big, well equipped armies are best suited for fighting other big, well equipped armies.

Bill Powell
08-16-2005, 22:46
I was shooting the bull with another guard in the petroleum dump when we heard some rattly sounds from the empty five gallon gas can storage. This person I was talking to had let it be known that he wanted to shoot someone, legally.

'We ran over to the fence and went up a ramp to the top of the fence. There, slowly limping toward town was a slicky boy who had to be at least 90 years old, and he had a five gallon gas can in each hand.

When you were walking guard and saw a crook you were supposed to shout HALT, three times in English and three times in Korean, and if they still don't stop, shoot a round for the lower extremities. What I heard was, HALTHALTHALT, blam blam. I went through the fence to check on the old guy, and one of the rounds had cut a shallow groove in the meaty part of his right thumb. the other guard ran up, saw the blood, dropped his carbine, and puked his last three meals all over himself and the old Korean. Never again did he declare a wish to shoot someone. I let the old guy keep the two cans and sent him on his way home. The only thing I ever shot as part of my guard duty duty was a 55 gallon drum, full of thirty weight motor oil. I shot the barrel three or four inches from the bottom, cause a guy was stealing it. I watched him go out of sight, with all his booty leaking of the holes I shot through the barrel. At some point I figure he felt the barrel getting lighter, or maybe he thought he was just getting his second wind.

For those of you who are going to tell me the stomach doesn't hold the last three meals. Well, never mind.

freepatriot
08-17-2005, 07:57
Bill, what kinds of things was this guy saying about wanting to shoot someone, before then? I mean, what was his mindset?

Also, what kind of a person was he after that night?

Thanks

Bill Powell
08-17-2005, 08:10
scottauld, you have to remember that when the guy ran up, he didn't that he had only creased the guy's thumb. up until that point his comments were a lot like some of the younger people on GT. A lot of the guys ready with, 'shoot the bastard', but you don't get much of that from guys who have actually seen a bullet wound, major or minor.

He was excited about the prospect of shooting someone, and considered guard duty the place to do it. He'd seen too many movies where getting shot was no big deal.

In answer to the second part of your question, subdued.

As for his mind-set, I don't think he had a mind, beyond his taking part in the next O.K. Corral

freepatriot
08-17-2005, 08:23
You can just call me Scott ;)

tous
08-17-2005, 08:43
Originally posted by scottauld
You can just call me Scott ;)

Can I call you Snookie Ukums?

Bill Powell
08-17-2005, 09:04
You can call me scott, or you can call me sco, or you can call me ott, or you can call me cot, just don't call me late for lunch. As you can see, I place some importance on lunch

freepatriot
08-17-2005, 09:32
Originally posted by tous
Can I call you Snookie Ukums?


You can call me anything you want, sweetie pie. ;3;3;3

freepatriot
08-17-2005, 09:33
Originally posted by Bill Powell
You can call me scott, or you can call me sco, or you can call me ott, or you can call me cot, just don't call me late for lunch. As you can see, I place some importance on lunch



Remember that guy, "You can call me Joe, or you can call me Moe, or you can call me Ray, or you can call me Jay... but you doesn't have to call me Johnson!"

He was a strange character.

freepatriot
08-17-2005, 09:33
Originally posted by Bill Powell
As you can see, I place some importance on lunch


I once read that great warriors eat whenever they can and sleep whenever they can. Not being a great warrior, I wonder if that's true. Any thoughts?

Bill Powell
08-17-2005, 09:37
Yes, it is true. I am living proof that a great warrior with no war gets fat and stays in bed all day.

freepatriot
08-17-2005, 09:46
;f

tous
08-17-2005, 10:12
Originally posted by scottauld
I once read that great warriors eat whenever they can and sleep whenever they can. Not being a great warrior, I wonder if that's true. Any thoughts?

You forgot one. Pee early and often. <c>b

Bill Powell
08-17-2005, 10:29
One memory that stick with you after returning from Korea is the odor of the honey pot. The one holers and the two holers in Korea do not have a pit beneath them for stuff to fall into and be forgotten. Instead there is a tray that slides in from a little door in the back of the toilet. This is all dumped into large urns, liquified, and allowed to ferment. You can see why GI's pray all summer for winter, cause during the winter the smell that permeates the Korean countyside. You can get a rough idea of what it smells like by stealing your grandmother's chamber pot, set it aout in the sun for a week or so, then stick your nose down in there for a good whiff. The Koreans thought our flush toilets and septic systems was the biggest waste of waste they had ever seen.

You now know what all of Korea smells like in the summer, cause they use that fermented crap to fertilize the rice paddies. There is a reason for this more than necessary description.

One of our main hobbies was stealing MP jeeps. They would stop in front of one of the bars to check it out, and while they were inside we would steal the jeep and hide it behind a building, or some bushes. Then the sneaky bastards came with the idea of leaving a KATUSA MP in the jeep. As soon as the jeep started rolling, that KATUSA started blowing his whistle. In the process of outrunning the MP's I stepped into a honey bucket up to my knee. The bus wouldn't give me a ride, the taxis told me to take a hike, and that's what I wound up having to do. I had to walk back, with people avoiding me like the plague. I got back pat curfew, but when the gate guards smelled me go by, they knew why I was late, and forgave my tardiness.

freepatriot
08-17-2005, 14:14
Oh man oh man oh man oh man oh ...

Bill Powell
08-17-2005, 20:02
After you've been in country in a place the backwoods of Korea for awhile, you develop a certain amount of animosity toward the people you meet on the road.

One of the more common views of a Korean and his A-frame is a guy walking down the road with straw piled eight feet high. They feel, sometimes too close for comfort, and sometimes tragically, that they can walk pretty much whereever in the hell they please. One thing some of the guys used to do was to drive by one of these straw piles, put their rifle in the straw, and fire a blank.

About the rottenest thing I have personally done to one is........

Let me explain. We were driving through Munsan-ni, and a guy with a hog on the back of his bicycle cut me off about three times for no reason, other than he could, and I had to accept it. At least, that's what he thought.

He had a hog, 300-350 pounds, lashed to the back of his bicycle, tight, with his feet sticking straight up in the air. The hog was lying upside down, helpless, without proper motivation. The guy got all cocky and rode off onto a country road. I handed my machete to my co-pilot and told him to slap the hog on the cojones with the flat side of the blade. He did, and all hell broke loose. The last time I saw Papa-san he was sitting on his ass in a rice paddy, shouting foul obscenities at us. The last time I saw the hog he was running over a rice paddy levee, with the bicycle sticking straight up in the air. At the time I thought it was funny as hell, and I got my revenge, from his transgressions, plus he paid for a couple of other sinners.

It was also fun to go into a predominately Korean, or Turk bar and drop three or four tear gas pellets between the lids of those coal brick stoves, and wander out again.

cruel, maybe. So is blinking your eye and losing everything you own.

freepatriot
08-17-2005, 20:15
Bill turned somber on us ;P




What's an A-Frame?

Bill Powell
08-17-2005, 20:48
The fastest way to describe one is for you to go to google images, and type in A-frame, Korea. The two right photos on the top row show a Korean with a load, and an empty A-frame. That's not a web address. go to google, go to images, and type that in.

We live in Quonset huts with plywood floors, and the wood was getting religious, it was getting way holey. They hired a Korean construction company to do cement floors. One truck came to the yard loaded with mixing troughs, A-frames, etc. You know, cement type stuff. The total pour in all the quonset huts was probably eighty or ninety cubic yards. Not a power mixer, no wheelbarrows, no nothing, except A-frames to haul the sand, and the fresh batch. It was all done with A-frames with boxes and a string controlled dump door. I had a picture of me wearing an A-frame. The box had 560 pounds of sand in it, and I could walk up stairs with it.

It used to drive the army engineers up a wall. The Koreans would build a new rice paddy, ten square feet or five acres. They'd get it finished, eyeball it one time, flood it, and precisely four inches of water would pour in, evenly. The engineers would do it with transits, levels, power equipment, and have to tweek their job five-six times before it would be as level as the eyeballed Korean job.

Going from Seoul to Kimpo AFB was a road, a two lane black top, up on top of a levee ten or fifteen feet above the paddies. They were going to four lane that road, and that meant building another levee. The army engineers tried to be helpful. They said they could build that second levee for them in a couple of months. The Korean official thought that was very generous, but that generosity, if accepted, would cost 275,000 Koreans work for eighteen months.

Remember, this was 1961. Their labor market is probably as screwed up as ours by now.

Jack Straight
08-18-2005, 14:32
a few comments:

Iraq: I heard some good news today. I guy who I think has been there said that the average Iraqui considers the insurgents to be the "invaders", not us. They are ratting them out, which is good.

Since I have not been in the military, I usually have not been short on sleep or food. But I do have a rule: Don't pass up and oppurtunity to use the restroom." Spoken as someone who has been on a lot of commercial planes, and has taken the water pill.

A-frame photos:
http://johnhamill.tripod.com/koreaaframe.jpg
http://veterans-usa.home.att.net/korea54aframe.jpg

freepatriot
08-18-2005, 14:53
Originally posted by Bill Powell
That's not a web address. go to google, go to images, and type that in.



Hey guys, you wanna hear somethin' funny? Bill thinks I don't know how to use Google Images! ;f;f;f



To quote old Bugs Bunny, "He don't know me vewy well, do he?"


;f;f;f;f;f


Bill, around here I'm sorta known for my hit and run picture posts.


;f;f;f;f;f


Thanks for the tip, my friend!

;?

freepatriot
08-18-2005, 14:56
Hey Bill, check this out:


http://www.transchool.eustis.army.mil/Museum/KoreanAframe.htm

Bill Powell
08-18-2005, 15:21
Sorry about the descriptive over kill, I just expllained it the way it would have to be explained to me. Pretty soon people are going to believe me when I tell them I'm about three weeks removed from a stone tablet, a mallet and a chisel. I know I should have able to pull up that A-frame information so you could click on it. but I can't. I found a photo of the compound where I lived in Korea, but I can't access it for two reasons. One is I don't know how, and the other is my computer is busted in such a way that does not allow me to access links.

Sorry if I offended you with my simplistic approach. That address you gave me? I'll have to turn every thing off, go to web search and type it in manually. Has anyone encountered that problem with their machine? My machine used to full of evil, but Eric's sister did a partial exorcism, and got rid of many of the demons.

Bill Powell
08-18-2005, 18:39
I can't access that address you sent. When I type a get a 'no such web address', and I try to click onto the address you posted, my computer goes into 'no response' mode.

You know, I'm average to above smart on most things, but these computer machines hate me and have made it their mission to confuse me. I like GT and google, but in general I really hate computers and I think they sense that.

Bill Powell
08-19-2005, 05:55
I mentioned the Turks earlier. Right over the hill from our compound was a Turk compound. Our compounds had eight foot high fences, coiled concertina, roving guard patrols, and we got hit every night by slicky boys. I think in english slick boy means 'nocturnal sneak thief'. The Turk compound had a gate, a ceremonial fence going out about fifty yards on either side of the gate. Beyond that was an eighteen inch high marker fence. Every few yards were little signs stating that any hands caught in their supplies would stay there, and it was not an idle threat.

The Turks that were there had been there since the war, and their only way home was to live out their enlistment, Have a volunteer in Turkey replace them (and be able to pay his way), or die. They had no rotation as we knew it. Most of their equipment had been sold on the black market, cause at a couple of bucks amonth in wages for a soldier was not enough to buy beer all month. In the dead of winter the gate guard would stand guard in an overcoat, and be relatively warm. His replacement would go the gate with a blanket wrapped around himself, and they would trade. As I said, everything had been sold. They knew the Americans would re-supply them if hostilities broke out.

The Koreans were deathly afraid of the Turks, and the quickest way to clear Koreans out of a bar was to have a couple of Turks walk in.

Nestor
08-19-2005, 13:32
Originally posted by Bill Powell

The Koreans were deathly afraid of the Turks, and the quickest way to clear Koreans out of a bar was to have a couple of Turks walk in.

...any special reason Bill? I'm just curious...

Bill Powell
08-19-2005, 14:50
One reason was, Adam, was that the Turkish military justice was harsh, and sometimes permanent. The Turks rode pretty rough shod over the Korean civilians. Words not used too often in that part of the country were words life civil rights.

freepatriot
08-19-2005, 22:11
I was not offended at all, Bill, I got a chuckle out of it.

I never heard of a problem on the computer like you are having though.

Nestor
08-20-2005, 00:41
Originally posted by Bill Powell
One reason was, Adam, was that the Turkish military justice was harsh, and sometimes permanent. The Turks rode pretty rough shod over the Korean civilians. Words not used too often in that part of the country were words life civil rights.

Thanks Bill. It looks logical... the Turks still have a lot of problems with the civil rights, even those days...and they want to be a part of the European Union ;P

Bill Powell
08-20-2005, 07:07
Makes perfect sense to me, Scott, I'm using it. I keep a small hammer lying on the table next to the computer and one of these days it's going to piss me off to the point I beat it up, and salvage some of that lead out of the monitor.

Adam, I still hear people saying that people all over the world basically think the same. I say again, they're wrong.

Patricia
08-20-2005, 12:14
Psst Bill, does Eric use that "you could break a rock" line on you when you are having computer problems? ;f ^<wg

Just did a bit of catching up on reading your stories. Be nice to your computer cause I'd just cry if we didn't get new ones coming. ^c ^c

Bill Powell
08-20-2005, 16:30
I think he skipped a generation and inherited that line straight from my dad. He's too amazed that I'm doing it at all to say too much. I resisted it as long as I could. Except for GT and Google I still basically hate the damned things, and I do not consider them my friend.

We got side-tracked a little. I'm going to re-do a couple that I posted two or three years ago, and than go on to some fresh ones. I found a picture of the very building I lived in in Korea, and it just laughs at me. I don't know how to fetch into my computer. I don't know why I'm having so much trouble learning how to drive this machine. I gues it's having to use a mouse for a steering wheel.

So far I've resisted doing any damage beyond throwing the mouse up against the wall. Tell Eric Hi.

lcarreau
08-20-2005, 16:35
Originally posted by Bill Powell
I think he skipped a generation and inherited that line straight from my dad. He's too amazed that I'm doing it at all to say too much. I resisted it as long as I could. Except for GT and Google I still basically hate the damned things, and I do not consider them my friend.

We got side-tracked a little. I'm going to re-do a couple that I posted two or three years ago, and than go on to some fresh ones. I found a picture of the very building I lived in in Korea, and it just laughs at me. I don't know how to fetch into my computer. I don't know why I'm having so much trouble learning how to drive this machine. I gues it's having to use a mouse for a steering wheel.

So far I've resisted doing any damage beyond throwing the mouse up against the wall. Tell Eric Hi.

COuld you post the url? Or tell us the what you googled to find it?

-Lonnie

Bill Powell
08-20-2005, 16:43
Dammit, just go ahead and laugh at me. What's a url?

Okay I looked it up. Uniform Recource Locators. How does that appy to me?

Bill Powell
08-21-2005, 06:59
The national off duty foot wear in Korea when I was there was Kimchi shoes, or thongs. I never could wear thongs, cause I don't like that rope between my toes. Kimchi shoes were a molded rubber shoe, sort of like a deck shoe. Where I was was on the southern edge of a hardship area. No civilian clothes, shoes, no cars, no family, no nada. As a result we were a little hard pressed for entertainment.

Where I was was Camp Jessup. Right at our front gate was Munsan-ni, where our railhead and fuel depot was, and three or four miles from there was the barrel farm. All of our reserve oils and fuels were stored there, in 55 gallon drums.

Most of the entertainment we were able to access was of a carnal, or at least a rowdy nature. I determined one day that I was wasting an hour a day getting dressed and undressed. After carefully considering my options I started going to town dressed in Kimchi shoes and a military rain coat. The way I accomplished this was to catch a ride on the aforementioned guard truck. It had to make that trip every two hours, back and forth, all night.

Please don't tell Eric about this post. He's under the illusion that his old man is a saint.

Bill Powell
08-21-2005, 07:21
Joe, a Korean civilian, was my houseboy. Actually he was our houseboy, and he was the second highest paid Korean civilian in our camp. The hishest paid was our company commander's secretary. Imagine Sandra Bullock with oriental eyes. She was at least five feet nine inches, and built more like a westerner than an oriental. This really impressed the company commander, but it only got him frustration. She told him one day that she was secretary, not whore person.

Back to Joe. I don't know what his actual name was. When he was in he Korean army he spent eighteen months at Ft Hamilton, New York, at MP school. He was one of these guys with a natural gift for language and accent. He spoke Engish as well as any of us and better than most, and he was the perfect butler.

None of us in our hut had a thing to do in the way housekeeping. We'd get up in the morning, see our display laid out, and know then we had an inspection that day. On top of that he was into pleasant conversation so he could keep his english honed.

All this convenience cost me three dollars a month.

Bill Powell
08-21-2005, 07:44
We had two ammo alerts while I was in korea. When the alert siren wails, you saddle up, get your stuff into position, and prepare to repel that Godless horde from the north. When the alert siren wailed the first thing you did was pull back the curtain and see what the villagers were doing. If it was business as usual in town, the alert was fairly casual.

Thanksgiving eve, 1960, an entire division of North Korean tanks was seen heading straight for the DMZ. That got the attention of our leaders, and we had an ammo alert. It turns out they were just screwing with our holiday.

The second was when General Park had his little military coup. Those two alerts were out of sequence and did create some excitement.

Where I was, if the North Koreans attacked, our losses were calculated to be 45 per cent, with five percent on emergency leave, R&R, and other reasons. North of the Imjin River, around the ninth cav area the American losses were calculated to be ninety five per cent, with five per cent, etc.

It was neat to go up to the DMZ police, and look through the glasses at North Korea, back behind the DMZ. There was a permanent sign that said "Yankee go home'. Every June thirtieth the Armistice came up for re-signing. Just before that a temporary sign would go up, saying, "G.I. in July you die'.

Bill Powell
08-21-2005, 08:42
Not too long after I got to Korea we inherited a mess sergeant, head cook, who had been a cook in one of the officer's messes in the Pentagon, til he incurred the wrath of some field grade officer who worked at the Pentagon.

For those of you who have been in the military, as Limey Cop would say, in the olden days, do you remember things like onion soup, ten gallons of water and an onion. Boil fifteen gallons of water and dump the coffee grounds in, period. If inmates in prison got food like that they would riot.

Our new mess sergeant planned his daily menu, went down to the warehouse and got hi ingredients fresh every day. He threw away the metal trays that we ate on, and those tan fiber mugs. He put table cloths on every table, and a small condiment selection. Once he determined the coffee needed for decent coffee, he sewed up a bunch of linen sacks for the grounds and we no longer had let the grounds settle to the bottom of our cup. He brought in white china plates and matching coffee cups. We had chocolate mild and ice cream almost every meal. Three cooks on the meat line, so you got your meat done to your taste. At noon our parking lot would be full of trucks from other units, after they found some feeble excuse to be at our compound at noon.

You get the idea, it was heaven. After about ten months he was forgiven, shipped back to the pentagon, and the next guy we got was just as bad as he was good. Our heaven became cullinary hell, and we lost our noon time guests.

One side note on our mess hall. At the window where we dumped our dishes there was a chute where we scraped the plates. They had to put in a panel so the Americans couldn't see the Korean kitchen help squatted down aroung the tubs picking out the best parts of our scraps. It was perfectly good food, but it turned a lot of the Americans completely off their food. The Koreans couldn't understand the Americans throwing away that much, and the Americans could not understand the Koreans wanting it.

Isn't it great to live in a country where a majority of the people have never had the need to raid a garbage tub.

Nestor
08-21-2005, 13:18
Originally posted by Bill Powell

Please don't tell Eric about this post. He's under the illusion that his old man is a saint.

Promise...I will be silent like a grave... ;z ;z ;z

Nestor
08-21-2005, 13:19
Originally posted by Bill Powell
There was a permanent sign that said "Yankee go home'. Every June thirtieth the Armistice came up for re-signing. Just before that a temporary sign would go up, saying, "G.I. in July you die'.

I'm sure there are no more signs there. The North Koreans ate it a few years ago...damn! Those poor people...

Nestor
08-21-2005, 13:26
Originally posted by Bill Powell
Not too long after I got to Korea we inherited a mess sergeant, head cook, who had been a cook in one of the officer's messes in the Pentagon, til he incurred the wrath of some field grade officer who worked at the Pentagon.

For those of you who have been in the military, as Limey Cop would say, in the olden days, do you remember things like onion soup, ten gallons of water and an onion. Boil fifteen gallons of water and dump the coffee grounds in, period. If inmates in prison got food like that they would riot.

Our new mess sergeant planned his daily menu, went down to the warehouse and got hi ingredients fresh every day. He threw away the metal trays that we ate on, and those tan fiber mugs. He put table cloths on every table, and a small condiment selection. Once he determined the coffee needed for decent coffee, he sewed up a bunch of linen sacks for the grounds and we no longer had let the grounds settle to the bottom of our cup. He brought in white china plates and matching coffee cups. We had chocolate mild and ice cream almost every meal. Three cooks on the meat line, so you got your meat done to your taste. At noon our parking lot would be full of trucks from other units, after they found some feeble excuse to be at our compound at noon.

You get the idea, it was heaven. After about ten months he was forgiven, shipped back to the pentagon, and the next guy we got was just as bad as he was good. Our heaven became cullinary hell, and we lost our noon time guests.

One side note on our mess hall. At the window where we dumped our dishes there was a chute where we scraped the plates. They had to put in a panel so the Americans couldn't see the Korean kitchen help squatted down aroung the tubs picking out the best parts of our scraps. It was perfectly good food, but it turned a lot of the Americans completely off their food. The Koreans couldn't understand the Americans throwing away that much, and the Americans could not understand the Koreans wanting it.

Isn't it great to live in a country where a majority of the people have never had the need to raid a garbage tub.

A good cook is a pure treasure in the Army. Really. I can understand you very well Bill. BTW the onion soup is one of my favorites, and damn it's a real art around...

Bill Powell
08-21-2005, 13:43
I like onion soup, too, but when you boil forty litres of water and toss in two onions, all you have is nasty tasting hot water. You're right, a well done onion soup is great.

It was spooky sooking across the valley on the north side of the DMZ, and seeing those big guns sticking out of caves. They were mounted on tracks and did not have to move around to aim, cause each one was pre-aimed at some spot in our sector.

We had a few fixed gun positions. On either end of Freedom bridge there were some M-47 tank turrets mounted in cement, pre-aimed at a point on the bridge. There were five rounds in an ammo rack. If the call came, the guard was to fire those rounds and haul ass south. Liberty Bridge, around the bend of the river to the east, was pre-packed with explosives, so all you had to was push a button.

There are actually two Freedom Bridges. There is the little one that crosses the DMZ, where they had the prisoner exchanges. The other is the big railroad bridge over the Imjim River.

Bill Powell
08-23-2005, 10:44
In a moment I will introduce you to Lt. Mark Hassel.

Homosexuality in most foreign armies is a thing of convenience, rather than a lifelong lifestyle. In Korea it was not uncommon to see a couple of ROK Soldiers or Marines walking along holding hands. I didn't condone it, or hate it, I was more like indifferent to it because it did not affect me.

We received a replacement officer, the aforementioned Lt. Hassel. He was a devout Mormon from Ogden, Utah. He could not accept anything about that kind of behavior from soldiers, foreign or domestic. I've seen him try to chew out, and seperate soldiers who were holding hands, and they had no idea what he was talking about. This inability to convert those people affected him in a horribly negative way.

End result was, he and his driver were going to another unit, and came up behind two ROK Soldiers who were walking along and holding hands. He had his driver get close to the edge of the road, and when got right behind the two Koreans, he held his arm straight out in a stiff arm, and yelled the guys. When one of them turned around to look, the Lt.'s fist hit him in the jaw. When he stiff-armed the Korean the jeep was doing about thirty MPH.

I don't know what happened to the Korean who was hit, but the Lt. had several broken bones in his hand, his elbow dis-located, and his shoulder jammed. We never did see Lt. Hassel again. While he was being patched up military Police showed up, packed all the Lt,'s belongings and took them away.

Poor guy, he tried to judge Koreans by Ogden, Utah standards, and basically went nuts.

I will repeat, as often as necessary, those of you who think people all over the world think alike are wrong.

Bill Powell
08-23-2005, 11:06
COUPLA' TRUCK DRIVING STORIES:

One day I was heading back to Munsan-ni at a pretty good clip, and I realized I had no fire to make smoke from my cigarette. While I was thinking about how to solve this I passed an old Papa-san sitting under a tree smoking his clay pipe. I did my best impression of stopping on a dime, and as I crawling out to get some fire, a Korean Lt. came charging up beside my truck, really irate. Seems they had rear ended me cause I had no brake lights. I went to the back of the truck with the Lt. and he pointed at my brake light, yelling that I had no light. For those of you familiar with the military light and ignition switch, there is position to make the brake lights work. I ran to the cab, palmed the switch to turn on the brake lights, and pushed the brake pedal. Tons of brake lights. After giving me a light, the Lt. and his driver left, with the Lt. slapping the crap out of the driver, who was sulking cause he knew he'd been wronged.


One of our guys got a ticket from an MP. He had not been able talk the MP out of the ticket, or threaten him out of the ticket. He set about to get his revenge. He was scheduled to haul a load of gasoline to the MP compound. He stopped the gas guy at about seven hundred gallons, and stopped by the truck wash station some Koreans had set up in a small river. He traded the truck wash guy ten gallons of gas to top his truck off with five hundred gallons of water. He delivered this concoction to the MP compound and dumped it in their tank.

For several days after that any MP you saw was driving what ever they could scrounge from other units. Problem was, the MP's didn't even know they had been screwed. It had been raining and they assumed the roof of their tank was leaking.

Bill Powell
08-23-2005, 12:01
We had, for awhile, a rash of thievery, stuff being stolen out of the back of trucks while they were driving. The speed through these little villages, especially when people were about, was twelve to fifteen MPH. A guy would run out from behind a building, grab the tailgate of the truck to maintain speed, and throw stuff out of the back of the truck with his free hand. A couple of solutions were tried, and they both worked.

We had a guy who ran a postal sub-station up by the DMZ. He started losing mail bags out of the back of his truck in one little village. Luckily, they mostly got military junk mail, cause that was thrown in the truck last. On one trip he got in the back of the truck, a 3/4 ton, and waited. As they were going through thsi village a hand grabbed the tailgate of the truck. About the time he had a good grip, Steve planted a size twelve shoe on those fingers, and started whapping the guy up side the head with his M-1911. The slicky boy sacrificed most of his knuckle skin to get away, and Steve never lost another mail bag.

Another solution was if you were driving through a village, and someone behind tooted his horn three times, fast, you used all the brakes your truck had.

I was following a ration truck through a little village called Sonyo-Ri, doing about twenty MPH. We were about halfway when a slicky boy ran out from between two buildings and grabbed the tail gate of the truck. His little stubby legs were churning to keep up with that truck. As he reached up in the back of the truck, I blew my horn three times, and the guy in front of me locked his brakes. Suddenly that truck in front of that Korean was doing closer to zero MPH, and he was still doing twenty. WWHUMPFFFF, and he just folded up into the back of that truck. Half a mile further on was a Korean Police station, where we could get rid of him.

Sound cruel? I thought so, too, when I first got there.

Bill Powell
08-23-2005, 13:24
As soon as someone figures out how to do it I'm going to show pictures of some of these places I speak of, like the Rec center where I saw Bob Hope, and the rail head and tank farm in Munsan-ni, and my humble home while I lived there.

One day while I was going to the tank farm to fill my twelve hundred gallon tank, some rat-bastard stole my best feeder hose.

You turned off MSR-1, and ran a quarter of a mile through what you would call the industrial section of Munsan-ni. When I got to the fill-up station I found my hose missing. I had gone to a great deal of trouble to steal that hose from an ordinance yard in Seoul, and I liked it. It was easy to take. Just grab it and stand still while the truck drives out from under it.

Like an idiot I grabbed my Machete, went back to the Korean shops, and faced off with about 30 Koreans. No one knew nuthink, so I started prowling around. They had not had time to hide it well, so I found my hose behind one of the hooches. I drug that big, heavy hose all the way back to my truck before they changed their minds about letting me have it.

Bill Powell
08-24-2005, 07:29
Another pre-post, years ago, don't remember which forum.

Operation Snow Tiger was one of our oportunities to practice our craft in extremely cold weather. Being from central Arizona, twenty six below zero qualified as extreme cold.

The crew of an M-47 tank was trying to keep warm after being refueled, about 270 gallons. The heater systems in these old tanks didn't work, so heaters were made from a C-ration can, mostly filled with sand soaked in gasoline. One of the guys was shifting his weight and kicked the C-ration can heater over, and when that happened the burning gasoline started running the bulk heads, toward the fuel tanks. One flick of a switch revealed that the fire extinguisher didn't work either.

That crew, leaving that tank, looked like five green blurs. In a little while the fire ignited the fuel tanks, and the heat and pressure built up in an instant. Almost simultaneously, 76 rounds of 90mm of various types, 24 rounds of 90mm blanks, about three thousand rounds of 30 and 50 caliber rounds, plus assorted grenades, artillery simulators, and 270 gallons of gas, exploded.

The only thing left inside the turret and hull of that tank was white paint. Everthing else was gone. The axle shafts, about 8" in dia., were sheared flush with the inside wall of the hull. The floor of the tank hull was rolled open like a sardine can. The engine, trans, and most of the heavy stuff went out the bottom. The tank jumped up in the air about thirty feet, and when it landed, it broke bogie rollers and ground wheels.

After all that, the inside of the tank was still white. Wherever something was welded to the hull, there was a spot of shiny raw steel.

I was about two valleys over, and saw the explosion.

freepatriot
08-24-2005, 13:54
Some pics of Camp Jessup and Munsan-ni:


http://glocktalk.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=424225


Scott ;c

Bill Powell
08-24-2005, 17:26
Pictures one thru five show part of the right of way of the old Pusan/Moscow railroad. The longest rail line in the world. The tunnel was just out the front gate to the right. On the near hill to the right you can see part of our compound fence.

photo seven: The white road running diagonally across the picture is MSR-1, the main highway from Seoul to Panmunjom.

picture 12: That 3/4 ton in the background could very well be the same truck I fed the kids from.

picture 14: right behind him was the telephone switch board for our division phone system. I could call as far as Japan on it.

picture 15: Look at Strouse's trigger finger on that carbine. The army, in their infinite wisdom, had you put green netting for camo. It didn't matter if you were in sand, snow, or what. You could fly over a bivouac area in the winter, and therre would be those green truck shaped nets.

Picture 16: bombed out box car

Picture 18: building in near foreground is the truck shop. I did a lot of illegal work on my truck there, and the motor would just shake his head and walk away. Chapel in background.

Picture 19: It was Quartermaster. Everyone had carbines.

Picture 21: Choppers so old most of you have probably never seen one. Sikorski H-19

Picture 23: Picture taken from Freedom Bridge, showing the old railroad bridge.

Picture 29: Mascots were hard to keep, especially big dogs. We lost many a mascot to someone's stew pot.

Picture 30: The village to the left is the one I attacked with my Machete.

Picture 31: Remember I told you about 15th Aviation Company and their Auxilliary strip at Munsan-ni, wher we took the air mail. We'll get back to it.

Picture 33: Our railhead tank farm and drum storage. Remember the slicky boy who's stick I moved? That happened behind that pile of barrels.

Picture 34: As I said earlier, I've never seen a place that could as cold, and as hot as that place could.

Picture 39: This is the village where I almost ran over the little girl.

Picture 44: We financed this orphanage.

Picture 47: The building behind the Quonset hut is wheerre the Turk soldier got his butt kicked by Franklin.

There's a few more, but I have to study them.

Bill Powell
08-25-2005, 09:14
Picture 31: I talked about, earlier, when I worked in the post office and we took the air mail to a little air field belonging to fifteenth aviation company. Well, this is the air field. When I was there, just out of the picture to the left was a hangar where the division commander kept his two illegal air craft. One was a Dehavilland Beaver, and the other was a Hughie helicopter, brand new in the service. Belonging to 15th Aviation Company, also, was a drone platoon, eith drones being launched from the back of a five ton truck. The launch was fairly explosive, and the drone was at flying speed when it cleared the back of the truck.

What was illegal about the planes was leather upholster in a soft tan color, gloss OD paint, and the first cav emblem done in gold leaf and laquer. That same airfield is where we held our skydiver club meetings. One day were at the airfield practicing packing our parachutes when one of those five tons pulled in, and set up a launch. He was more interested in impressing up than he was in positioning his launch ramp. He hit the launch button, the rocket fired, and the drone took off, right into the side of the hangar. It missed clearing the roof by about two feet. Drone, roof, wall, and other assorted debris rained down on those two illegal aircraft.

Don't think of these drones as model airplanes, think of them as pilotless aircraft. If they were a model plane, you wouldn't need a five ton truck as a support vehicle. The most amazing thing was there was no fire.

Bill Powell
08-25-2005, 18:15
Picture 44: OB beer was one of the UN authorized breweries. You also had Arirang, and San Miguel from the Phillipines. From the states was Black Lable, Pabst, and one I can't think of. The locally produced alchohol would kill you. White Horse gin was the worst.

Again, the orphanage is the one we sponsored. We each donated a little cash each month, and if they had a special need, if we couldn't buy it we'd steal it. We were Quartermaster, after all.

We, when I was in the post office, worked with graves registration, to ship home remains, old and fresh. We were constantly finding Soldiers who had been washed up by a fresh rain.

We had one kid, the company clerk, who had us on call constantly to let him know when we had a body bag, so he could look. Well, one day a Sgt in an artillery unit just over the hill went to town and got his head smoking on white horse gin. Not only will White Horse make you go blind, it will make you go crazy. He came back to his rack, stuck his M-2 in his mouth on full auto, and put about twenty rounds through the top of his head befor his toe fell off the trigger. The dummies at the local clinic, instead of taking him to the hospital where he could be containerized and shipped, dropped him at our post office til the hospital ambulance could come.

I figured I would cure this kid of sucking eggs, so I called him and told him we had a body bag. He was at the post office in a flash, unzipped the bag, and stuck his head in for a good look. He threw up on what was left of the sgt's head, went out the door and passed out. When he finally got all better you couldn't get him in that post office with a pry bar.

Bill Powell
08-25-2005, 20:39
Picture 11:
Entrance to 15th Quartermaster compound. Photo six is the same picture, but picture 11 is correct.

Going left out the gate, toward Munsan, is where I used to hitch rides on the guard truck, wearing only my raincoat. Where I usually went was the group of houses about a third of a mile up the road.

There are two guys standing just ouside the white guard shack, and a third guy in the foreground of the picture. They're all three on the road bed of the Pusan/Moscow railroad right of way. Directly above the two guys, on the near side of the road, are three or four little shacks. Those are outhouses, strategically placed over a deep ditch on the side of the road. This makes it easier for the honey patrol to pull the trays out of the outhouse. Those houses, the ones about a third of a mile up the road is where we used to shoot rats of the rafters with M-1911's. The biggest building, way up the hill, is a Methodist mission.

Where the road disappears toward the upper left of the picture is where the railhead and tank farm was.

Eric
08-27-2005, 00:43
Hi folks. I was digging through some old pictures and found this one of Bill and my uncle Jack. Bill is the one on the right. This is very much what he looked like in the stories he has been sharing with you. I hope his hair was a little shorter though, but probably not. You know what those supply-types are like. ;f Eric


<center><img src="http://ericdpowell.com/docs/BillNJack-750.jpg"></center>

Bill Powell
08-27-2005, 07:48
Damn, Eric, that drags up some old memories. Jack is my brother who died a couple of years ago. I celebrated the occasion shortly afterward by having my heart attack me. Jack was an LEO most of his adult life, ranging from a county mounty to chief of police.

Thanks Eric, I didn't know that picture was still around.

CRider
08-29-2005, 10:26
More More More!!!


;f Sorry, just really enjoy reading your words. Well written, and thank you for sharing Bill!

Bill Powell
08-29-2005, 21:18
One of my jobs was to support units in the field with fuel. I was kind of an independent agent, answerable to not much of anyone but the fuel schedule. I remember one day we were up north of the 38th parallel, tucked in against the DMZ, doing a field exercise. I was sitting on the fender of my truck, wearing a boony hat and no shoes. A full colonel, the one with the chicken on his shoulder, walked up and asked where my helmet and boots were. I told him some bastard stole them and I'd get some more first chance I got. Damned if he didn't just grunt, "see that you do" and walk away.

The people that were in about the time I was probably remember the military operator's license. You had to have it on your license before you could operate a memeograph machine. You had a space on your license for about four pieces of equipment, and any additional qualifications could be put on fold out panels. I had three fold out panels on my license, authorizing me to operate any piece of equipment in Korea. Let me splain how I did this.

On this Fourth Cav field exercise, for instance. I was supposed to, while they were bivouaced, give them thirty gallons warm up fuel, and their unit provided them with the daily C-ration individual meal packs. I would say, "Hey, let me drive your M-48, or M-113 APC, or a quad fifty." You qualified? "No, that's why I want to drive it." No way, Jose. Well, before I left my unit to become part of this little adventure, I loaded up my truck with 15 or 20 cases of C-rations, and other goodies not usually available in the field. After I offered them a case of C-rations and full fuel tanks, they would tell to have it back in whatever time they needed it. Then I would stop by their motor pool clerk and he would sign my license with the motor officer's rubber signature stamp.

I take that back. I didn't have Atomic Annie on my license, but I did have the front carrier unit. I was probably the most qualified operator in the history of Korea. What I meant to say was that I was authorized to operate more different types of equipment than anyone in Korea.

freepatriot
08-31-2005, 18:22
I'm the most qualified operator in the history of my mind.:cool:

Cool stuff, Bill, keep it coming.

Bill Powell
08-31-2005, 21:50
This another pre-post, in some forum, at some time in the past.

This is the very same exercise as the one where I lost my boots, or didn't take them, I don't remember. It doesn't matter. The colonel accepted my explanation for not being in full military uniform. On this exercise I even got to drive a SPAT (self propelled anti tank). Basically it is a 90mm anti tank gun mounted on a set of tracks, with a Continental boxer aircraft engine cradled down between the tracks. Cool tool.

Anyway, on this exercise, as others, I wasn't bound by any hard set camping rules. I was able to find a secluded little spot, with no one around. I bedded down, feeling that I had outsmarted those cav types again. About two in the morning my truck jumped straight up in the air, all the snaps come undone on my canvas top, one door flew open, and my eyes sprang open for they, too, wanted to know what hit them.

Seems I had parked just down range, and directly under the muzzle of a 280mm atomic cannon, and they popped off a round. You ever stand too far in front of a 155mm gun when it fired. I have, and it's a BB gun compared to that 280mm. I used to watch them fire at Ft Sill, and they would make dust bunnies all the way to the target, 1800 yards in front of the muzzle. 1800 yards was point blank, flat trajectory shooting. I believe the only thing that saved my hearing was the canvas roof, which absorbed the initial shock wave.


My brother-in-law was in armor in Washington tate, and then Alaska during the Korean war. The had a gunner who had nine thumbs, all left handed. They had the worst gunnery record in their company. One day this gunner got his alert orders for Korea, and all the guys he left behind were worried for the safety of the crew of which-ever tank he was assigned to.

My brother-in-law got a letter from a guy who went to Korea at the same time. I think the bumble gunner was in an M-26. Anyway, they were going along a road and when they rounded a curve they found themselves face to face with a T-34, a Chinese T-34. By the time the tank commander got over his surprise, and got down in the turret and shut bumble gunner down, he had put 13 90mm rounds into that T-34 from about 75 yards away. He hit it with AP/WP/HE, and whatever round his fingers touched next. The never called him bumble gunner again.

Bill Powell
09-02-2005, 09:02
In the photos that Scott was kind enough to post for me, there is photo eighteen, showing the compound truck shop. The shop was authorized 2nd echelon work, which was light maintenance, up to carburetor changes, starters, brake jobs. Their authorization did not include welding on the vehicles.

One day I walked into the shop and standing in a group were the motor officer, motor sergeant, a 3/4 ton driver,and a couple of hangers on. The 3/4 ton driver had stopped in with a gas tank leak, and wanted it fixed. They had pulled the tank filled it with water, dumped it, filled a second time and dumped it. As I walked in the Korean mechanic was just firing up his torch. I asked if he was going to weld it, and when he said yes I said bye bye. They laughed at my butt as I cleared the door.

About ten paces after I cleared the door BOOM. I went back inside and the gas tank looked like a basketball, and the faces of all the guys were black and fuzzy. After I saw they weren't seriously hurt, I laughed and they got mad. They learned what I already knew. The liquid gasoline they dumped out of that tank was not explosive. What was explosive was the gas vapor trapped in the corners of that tank. You would think career truck people would know better.

Bill Powell
09-03-2005, 15:15
One evening, one New Year's Eve evening, as a matter of fact, the Officers were having a party at the Officer's Club, and felt the need for female companionship. They called the Red Cross girl billets, and arranged for some party companions. I was sent in a jeep to ferry these lovelies to and fro, from their billets to the Officer's club and back.

Everything was going great til about eleven thirty that evening. I was carrying the last girl to the party, going through Sonyo-ri, when a papa-san staggered out into the road. I hit the brake just as we were going into a chuck hole, and instead of sliding or bouncing through the bump, the tire stopped. We flipped end over end down into a frozen rice paddy about ten feet below the road. Neither of us were hurt but the jeep was injured somewhat. The Monday morning formation, two days later, saw that jeep sitting there, looking just like it did, except for new windshield and frame, and a fresh paint job. We did some serious trading that week-end. What the officer's were having us do was totally illegal, so the jeep was never damaged, and all the repair work was just practice.

Bill Powell
09-03-2005, 16:12
Someone mentioned the ROK Marines earlier, I think it was Lonnie. As I mentioned earlier, there was spot about a mile and a half north of us that was a favorite ambush site for infiltrators. they would set up a gun, shoot the hell out of the next jeep that passed along, and haul ass for Seoul. To us most Koreans looked alike, and they could hide from us in plain sight, just by standing in a crowd.

We had a spare hooch, and we turned it over to a ROK Marine anti-terrorist platoon. They would train in our parking lot. They would take a squad sized rubber raft, ten rowers strapped into their seats. You had a squad leader and his equipment. They would row that rubber raft across our hard packed parking lot, each rower pulling his weight, plus weapons and gear, one tenth the weight of the raft, and one tenth the weight of the squad leader and his weapons and gear. I'm a gonna told you sumpin rat now, Mongo was impressed.

After they took over, not one group of infiltrators ever made it to Seoul.

They also hired some Korean civilian labor service guards to cover our more sensitive areas. They were armed with Winchester trench guns, and their orders were basically like ours. Shout halt three times, da da da , and as a last resort, aim for the lower extremeties. What we would here was, HALTHALTHALT, BAM BAM. They took no prisoners.

Our warehouse losses went right in the toilet, to almost nothing.

Bill Powell
09-03-2005, 16:41
When I first got to Korea I was constantly forming opinions and having to suddenly recognize reality. I would be judging a situation by Arizona standards, and remember, suddenly, that I was in Korea, and realize that had I been born and raised in Korea, I would accept certain situations.

Before that becomes totally random, let me give you a couple of examples. A couple of weeks after I was there I was passing a company of ROK soldiers doing their morning PT. There was one guy who was constantly straggling back, and when he did he got a wooden rod across the calves of his legs. It gave him initiative to re-join the unit. My first though was, no way would I tolerate that, and then decide, in Arizona I would not tolerate that, but had I been born in Korea..........

KATUSA--KOREAN ARMY TRAINING WITH THE US ARMY. We had about thirty or forty KATUSA soldiers living with us and training with us. They worked under our NCO's, but they had their own first SGT, one Sgt Kim.
Every unit has a screw up, right? Private Park was ours. He would be in formation, he would be called out, and the ass chewing would begin. The first Sgt would talk awhile, and then slap him, and on, and on. One evening Park came to the motor pool wanting to go to the clinic. When asked why he showed us a big gash on his leg. Sgt Kim had hit him with an entrenching tool, and he needed stitches.

Would I have tolerated that abuse? Had I been born and raised in Korea, probably............

Nestor
09-08-2005, 12:41
Originally posted by Bill Powell
When I first got to Korea I was constantly forming opinions and having to suddenly recognize reality. I would be judging a situation by Arizona standards, and remember, suddenly, that I was in Korea, and realize that had I been born and raised in Korea, I would accept certain situations.

Before that becomes totally random, let me give you a couple of examples. A couple of weeks after I was there I was passing a company of ROK soldiers doing their morning PT. There was one guy who was constantly straggling back, and when he did he got a wooden rod across the calves of his legs. It gave him initiative to re-join the unit. My first though was, no way would I tolerate that, and then decide, in Arizona I would not tolerate that, but had I been born in Korea..........

KATUSA--KOREAN ARMY TRAINING WITH THE US ARMY. We had about thirty or forty KATUSA soldiers living with us and training with us. They worked under our NCO's, but they had their own first SGT, one Sgt Kim.
Every unit has a screw up, right? Private Park was ours. He would be in formation, he would be called out, and the ass chewing would begin. The first Sgt would talk awhile, and then slap him, and on, and on. One evening Park came to the motor pool wanting to go to the clinic. When asked why he showed us a big gash on his leg. Sgt Kim had hit him with an entrenching tool, and he needed stitches.

Would I have tolerated that abuse? Had I been born and raised in Korea, probably............

Those a the words of wisdom my friends. Judging the situation by YOUR OWN standards could be a wrong method when you are on the second end of the World. I think we are often make this mistake...

Bill Powell
09-09-2005, 21:35
Let me tell you about Stevens. Stevens was one of those rare individuals who could jump into a rose bouquet and come out smelling like a dog turd, every time.

Stevens got into the karate movement when it became popular. He trained and grunted, and thumped stuff, broke tiles, and one by twelve planks, one foot long. He sweated out his first belt, and strutted downtown so folks could look at him and marvel. He got into a confrontation with a guy about two thirds his size. He went into the proper attack mode, and warned the guy he knew karate. About the time the last syllable sounded, the guy hit Stevens on the jaw with an oak stool, and put him in the hospital where they wired his jaw shut. I always subscribed the oak stool discipline where hand to hand combat is concerned.

When he got out of the hospital he went looking for the guy what hit him. He found the guy, and got hit again, higher up. All he got was a split ear and a split scalp.

On the boat, coming back from Korea, he made a general nuiscance of him self. He made fun of the sailors, rode the spare anchor, and called the swabbies rude names. One day he asked one of the sailors how deep the water was, and after a quick mental calcutation, he said it was about twenty eight thousand feet deep.

I don't know how deep Stevens thought the water might be, but when he found out he turned pale, was in sick bay within fifteen minutes, and for the rest of the cruise he was in sick bay, deathly ill. It was like he thought you were more likely to drown in twenty thousand feet of water than you were in twenty feet of water.

Speaking of coming out smelling like...............We had a kid in Germany who volunteered for the Nam. About the time he signed the papers they changed the age limit to eighteen, so he waited, and when he turned eighteen, re-applied. He got his pre-Nam thirty day leave, got on the plane and went to Nam. After he got off the plane, he literally did not live to get to the repo-depot, about forty yards from the plane. He got nailed by incoming fire.

TofsLady
09-11-2005, 04:22
I'm enjoying reading these stories so much. I just wish it hadn't been so late when I stumbled upon them. They've kept me up much too late.:)

Schools don't teach respect for the flag anymore, not for a long time. A majority of families don't teach it, simply because they don't think to.

I have to tell you Bill, that my school does teach respect for our flag. At least at the elementary level.

Due to the craziness of our laws, we have to have a prominently displayed sign that it is not mandatory to salute the flag, but for the past 19 years I have done what I can to teach my third graders what the flag stands for and insist that they show respect for our flag.

Thank goodness I have never had a child in my class that was not allowed to salute our flag, because we start each morning with the flag salute.

Sorry if this is considered a highjack, but I wanted you to know that some places do still try.

Bill Powell
09-11-2005, 07:01
TofsLady, it is impossible to do a hi-jack when everything is welcome. There's a guy in GNG telling some great stories about the prison system, and Vigilant tells some great stories.

I think it is great that your school is still doing the flag salute, and I hope it continues forever.

Where in SE Okla? I used to know a guy slightly from Durant. He was a touring drag racer.

I am still a little amazed that people show an interest in the tuff we used to do. Thanks for writing. It makes those little blisters on the ends of my fingers worthwhile. You can do the grammar corrections.

Bill Powell
09-11-2005, 08:54
I'm going to try to include a picture with this. If the picture doesn't work it will make no sense at all.

How I taught myself to touch-type. In the day-room, labeled day-room, we had an old Smith-Corona typewriter with no ribbon. We had lots of typing paper and carbon paper. I was corresponding with about thirty people and typing was easier. My solution was to make every letter I wrote a carbon copy. People were a little offended at first, til I explained what the situation was. Every sentence, or so, I would peel back the top sheet and check for mistakes. I found myself having to check less and less as time went on.

The club was about twenty feet higher than my home, and my friend Steve Kiger and I would get our heads smoking, and just roll down the hill, rather than use the steps. One morning we woke up, and almost went to the hospital. solidmass of cuts and scrapes, and little puncture wounds. Seems the day before they had cut the hillside with scythes, and left a thousand little pointy sticks sticking up out of the grass. We were so wasted the night before we didn't even feel it. We made up for that the next morning.

I was one of the projectionists in our little movie theater. It was set up just like a full growed theater, except it was 16mm. It cost a dime for all the late run movies. Ben-Hur cost a quarter.

About fifty yards to the right of where the photographer was standing is where the guy broke the jaw of the Lt.

The square building directly in line with the day room, sort of up to the left, is the community potty, showers, etc. At ten or twenty below it was a pretty brisk walk to the shower.

Bill Powell
09-12-2005, 11:04
Those of you who saw the photos that Scott posted for me saw that they were done by one Bill Strouse. I never knew Strouse, but I saw his signature in a lot of places where he signed over the high speed radio equipment to a guy I knew when I got there. He was typical of the guys I knew over there, guys away from home the first time, having the adventure of their lives. He could have fun, cause he knew, deep down, that the North Korean threat was just filler material for journalists. He could put us, with his radio equipment, in instant contact with the White House, but it was always just an exercise.

It wasn't just the privates. Our combat veteran leadership was very limited. In our entire company we had maybe five combat veterans, so if the fecal matter had hit the rotating air transfer device, our area would not have been a good place to be.

In one sense little wars here and there, while not wanted, can be important because they keep us supplied with experienced leadership. We had a full blood Sioux, named Featherman. When the second world war ended he was a Sgt. Major; within three months he was a private. When the Korean war ended he was a First Sgt, within three months he was a private. He was a specialist 4th class when I was there, but they made him an acting Sergeant so he could get a liquor ration. He was a warrior, and with no war he became a drunk. Had the war started while I was there, I would have fallen in with Featherman. He said the same thing about me, cause I was the best long distance shooter in the company. He, too, did not believe in getting up close and personal with the enemy.

Bill Powell
09-13-2005, 09:36
I mentioned earlier that I did M-2 carbine repair for the Gila County, Ariz. sheriff's office, actually a substation in Miami, Ariz. How did I get all my parts and tools to fix these weapons, you may ask? This is where a wonderful thing called 'Hold Baggage' enters the picture.

Hold Baggage is the poundage allowed by the military for you to ship home when you rotate. It is exempt from customs, or any other check normally done to baggage coming in from overseas. The reason for this is that your local transportation officer checks your baggage, okays it, a set of orders is inserted, and one stapled to the outside, and it is shipped directly to your house. Well, when you have control of the memeograph machine that prints those orders, and you have access to the transportation officer's signature rubber stamp, you can ship at will.

I divert your attention back to the horribly wasteful trash dumps that were full of gun parts, knives, tools, and whatever else gets tossed for no good reason. I wasn't greedy. I shipped only three footlockers home, loaded with little treasures that would fit in my lockers. A model 1911 will fit in a footlocker. I didn't ship home but a couple of complete weapons, cause I didn't want to tempt fate.

One story I remember with fondness was about the guy who was going to ship home a Garand, one piece at a time, via the US Postal service. A postal inspector happened to check his first package, and checked all his packages til he had a complete Garand. He assembled the rifle, mailed it back to the kid, and told him to not try that nonsense anymore. I enjoy the story, but I can't see it going down like that.

When I worked in the post office my big crime was never buying postage. I used a stamp I found on the floor, and used it to hand stamp all my letters. The postal people in the states could plainly see that there was a stamp on the envelope when it was canceled. Anyway, I never got any feedback from it.

I had my girlfriend in Globe, Ariz send me a letter adressed simply; Bill Powell APO 24 It got to Korea in two days. The date stamp was one day old, but the international date line gave us the extra day. I hedged my bet by working in the post office, and alerting all the mail sorters, but it was still amazing that it got there. Today's modern post office would not be able to do that.

freepatriot
09-13-2005, 15:33
Hiya Bill #wav

What was the scene like when you came home the first time after joining up?


What was the scene like when you came home from overseas?

S ;c

Bill Powell
09-13-2005, 16:01
I've never been asked that question before, Scott.

The first time I came home, after eight weeks of basic, The scene was happy, but not a time of wild rejoicing, because I spent a lot of time in the mountains, spent summers with my cousin, was away with the national guard, summers with the Air Force for Eagle Scouts. We were an air troop. Homecomings after weeks away were fairly common.


Coming back from Korea was a different story. I had been gone almost two years. The time they were expecting me back didn't happen, because I was extended in Korea because of the Berlin Wall. When I did make it home they had no idea I was in the country. My mother was in the kitchen, preparing a meal, when I just walked into the room and stood behind her. She turned and looked at me twice before she reacted. When she realized who I was the celebration was on. She was a large woman, and she did her best to stomp a hole through that kitchen floor. After the uproar died down I was gone again for another year.

We were a large family, ten kids, but were were fairly close-knit.

Bill Powell
09-15-2005, 12:02
M220 Shop Van. Look it up and you will see one of my favorite military trucks. It came out during Korea, and was in service up through the sixties. It had a 302 cu in GMC six cylinder engine, and a hydra-matic transmission. Behind the trans was a reduction gear and differential splitter, for all wheel drive. It was a 6X6, meaning six wheels rolling, six wheels pulling. The exhaust came back to a flat muffler under the right door, and a vertical pipe went up along side the cab.

Did you ever turn the key off while you were rolling, and turn it back on again a few seconds. While the key is off the engine is still turning, pulling gas into itself, and exhausting it, unburned. When you turn the key back on the fire from the exhaust ignites all that gas, and it explodes. Let's go back to that vertical pipe which traps and contains all that unburned gas. I have blown the entire exhaust pipe and muffler off my truck.

Why would you do this was the question I was most often asked. Well, I had to commute daily through a city of four million people who did not recognize the sound of a horn, but still recognized the sound of artillery fire from the war. Doing the ignition trick while rolling up to a intersection tended to clear the road til you could pass.

One of the guys of a meaner temperament did that while passing a honey wagon in downtown Seoul. At the sound of the explosion the Korean's pony bolted and dumped four large clay urns of fermented people poo all over the street. I used it mainly to clear intersections, and sometimes for amusement, but only in the country. Too many ways to get trapped in the city long enough for your pursuers to catch you.

By the way, I woudln't recommend that ignition trick on a modern car. It could raise hell with the sensors. More on this truck later.

freepatriot
09-16-2005, 09:32
Originally posted by Bill Powell
I've never been asked that question before, Scott.

Glad I could help :)

freepatriot
09-16-2005, 09:52
Originally posted by Bill Powell
We were a large family, ten kids, but were were fairly close-knit.

Understatement of the year, I'm sure.


That is a darned good story, Bill. :)

freepatriot
09-16-2005, 09:56
http://www.m201.de/armytrucks/2_5-ton/m220/m220_1.jpg

Best pic of an M220 that I can find. Sorry it's so small.

freepatriot
09-16-2005, 10:06
Originally posted by Bill Powell
By the way, I woudln't recommend that ignition trick on a modern car. It could raise hell with the sensors. More on this truck later.


I used to do it when driving teenagers around in my Mercury Bobcat. Made the kids think I was out of gas, coasting. I'd start her back up before we stopped rolling but never had it go boom. I guess I let it stay turned off long enough that any gas left over in the pipes was evaporated.

FoxMustang
09-16-2005, 13:15
Did you leave it in gear, Scott, or were you coasting in neutral? Gotta leave it in gear so the engine keeps pumping :)

Never been able to do that trick, all my cars have been fuel injected.

freepatriot
09-16-2005, 15:13
Neutral.

Bill Powell
09-16-2005, 15:51
You gotta leave everthing alone. Just turn the key off, and after a bit, back on. For some reason some cars are better than others for the muffler explosion. You can do it with a fuel injected car, as long as it's mechanical fuel injection. Not many of those.

freepatriot
09-16-2005, 21:16
Why did you like the M220 over other military trucks?

Bill Powell
09-17-2005, 08:40
The M220 was just one in a list of M200 series trucks. It started with the M211, and was built as a straight cargo truck, dump truck, gasoline tanker, water tanker, shop van, etc. That series was my favorite. Why did I like them best? Hell, I don't know. First love, first serious truck. They were fast, fun to drive, strong, and they were simple, like me.

Go to Google web and type in list of "M" series military vehicles. You will see more types of "M" designations than you could possibly care about.

I've had them in snow, ice, mud, and they just keep on keeping on, and they had good heaters. I like that in the winter time.

One day I was in a race with what I thought was a bus, trying to beat me to a road intersection. My lane and his lane sort of Veed into one lane. Just before we got there we collided, big time. Turns out it was a street car. He couldn't move over. It knocked him up on two wheels for a bit, and put me up on the curb. I stopped after I cleared Seoul, to find out what it was that was going whoompf-whoompf as I drove. There was a chunk of 2X4 stuck in between my tire and wheel, and the end of it was just brushing the road as the wheel rotated, making that noise. I couldn't get it out so I had to leave it there til I got to where I could deflate the tire.

The Postal Division sign on the side of the truck made you pretty much immune from any trouble from the MP's. Nobody in his right mind messed with the postman, cause that way pre-dated the internet, good phone systems, and your only contact with home was by mail.

I do tend to ramble. All this, and I don't know if I answered your question.

freepatriot
09-17-2005, 18:29
The rambling is the best part. ;)


...and you answered the question just fine. Now I have to think of another one.

Bill Powell
09-18-2005, 13:08
This is not about Korea, but it is a true story. It happened to a guy my dad worked with at the copper mine.

My Dad's Friend the Elk Hunter....


Right after the second world war my dad's friend came home from the war with a pocket full of mustering out pay and the ongoing urge to kill something.

Well, elk season was just around the corner, so he bought himself a new pick-um-up truck, a palomino, a saddle, a horse trailer, and brand new straight shootin rifle. First morning of elk season he was up on the Mogollon Rim, by the city of Young. A mighty hunter her was, stealthy, and a recently trained military scout. Straight away he decided any fool can chase down a deer with a horse. it was time to do some stalking....

He tied the horse to a tree, and starts working his way down the hill, through the trees, chasing a sound he'd heard. Just as his Daniel Boone ambitions were wearing pretty thin, he saw movement through the underbrush.

Elks are sorta tan, right? BLAM, So is a palomino horse.

When he got to his target, right there, about two inches forward of the cinch strap, he'd drilled that horse through and through.

He stripped the saddle, drove to town, sold the saddle and horse trailer, and aint been back in the woods since.......

freepatriot
09-18-2005, 14:53
I bet he took a lot of guff for that one over the years.

freepatriot
09-18-2005, 14:58
Hey Bill, tell me about your reaction to the news that there was a brand new war in Korea.



And tell me about when your neighbor's grandson (the one in the Mississippi Air National Guard) buzzed her house, in a P-51 Mustang.


;f;f;f

Bill Powell
09-18-2005, 20:07
It was June, 1950, school was out, and I usually went to the main road to get my neighbor's TIMES PICAYUNE, a New Orleans paper. One day I picked up the paper, and the headlines were in red three inch caps. WAR IN KOREA. I knew a little bit about war from history, the movies, and my books.

My reaction was one of a little excitement, until I started hearing the dive bombers practicing at Keesler AFB. Keesler was south east of us, about fifty miles, but the dive bombing range was much closer. You could see the planes start the dive, and after a little while---WHOOMPF. My cousin, who was three years older than me, and wiser, told me the bombers were working their way north and would be at our house pretty soon. That spooked me. I went down into the swamp, built a fort, and stocked it with food and weapons. I never had to use my fort cause we moved twenty miles north and I could no longer hear the bombers.

After that the Saturday Movietone News was my gateway to the war. I remember that paper like it was yesterday.



If you've never stood in your neighbors yard and had a P-51 make a high speed pass not more than three hundred feet above your head, you should, just once. I've flown in B-17's, C-45's, and other multi-engine planes, but I've never been up in a fighter. I'd like that.

freepatriot
09-18-2005, 20:32
<---has never stood in my neighbors yard and had a P-51 make a high speed pass not more than three hundred feet above my head

<---flew for half a day in the cargo hold of a C-130 ... long trip ;g

Bill Powell
09-18-2005, 20:41
Never flown in a 130. Had a half day flight in a C-124. In that flying barn was one bag of mail, one air force passenger the crew, and me. Stand in the plane, look out the window at the wing tip, and you can see where it gets the nickname "SHAKY".

engineer151515
09-18-2005, 20:50
<<= .......

Edited. Was trying to be funny and ... well.... like the old Indian said to Dustin Hoftman in the movie "Little Big Man"....

"Sometimes the magic works, sometimes it doesn't."

Bill Powell
09-18-2005, 20:54
Obviously you did not have an older and wiser cousin telling you the end was near.

engineer151515
09-18-2005, 20:58
You know I love your stories, BP.

Your fortune is but a book deal away.

Bill Powell
09-19-2005, 06:00
How come you edited all the good stuff away? It was funny and the magic did work.

freepatriot
09-19-2005, 07:59
<---saw it before he edited it, but forgot what it was.

Put it back eng.

Bill Powell
09-19-2005, 09:14
He, too, built a fort and stocked it, but his wife made him take it down, or something to that effect. I thought it was cool.

Bill Powell
09-19-2005, 10:43
While my brother-in-law, Ted was in Alaska a rumor drifted in that a bunch of North Korean Soldiers were on Adak, I think, camping out and having a picnic, and whatever else you do do to occupy someone else's land. They first sent in a scout company, and whn they found nothing they sent in a D-8 Caterpillar to level some extra runway. Once they did that they flew a C-124 in with some more troops and equipment. It was learned the North Koreans were not there and probably had never been. When they got ready to leave they decided to fly the D-8 out in the C-124.

Look up a C-124 and check out the size of the wing compared to the size of the plane, plus the weight of the D-8 and the rest of the crap.

Well, a couple of Ted's buddies did that, and decided there was not enough wing on that plane to fly all that stuff out of there. They refused to get on the plane, even after being threatened with court martial. The navy had to send in a crew boat to get them, and the navy took back to the mainland.


Oh, by the way, that thirty five, or so, minutes of patrol work qualified Ted for the VFW.


A buddy of mine was ground crew chief on a C-124 at Travis AFB, north of San Francisco. If the crew of That plane had any idea how many times my buddy sent them on the Viet Nam turn-around, they would have strung him up from a hangar girder. While the plane was gone my buddy had nothing to do. Plus, it was not there and back, a Viet Nam turn-aroung was twenty one days.

freepatriot
09-19-2005, 13:36
Originally posted by Bill Powell
He, too, built a fort and stocked it, but his wife made him take it down, or something to that effect. I thought it was cool. That's right.

Out in the swamps.

freepatriot
09-19-2005, 13:38
Did Ted get in trouble for not getting on the plane?

Bill Powell
09-19-2005, 15:05
No, that was a different time. The Navy was going there anyway.

engineer151515
09-19-2005, 20:00
Originally posted by Bill Powell
He, too, built a fort and stocked it, but his wife made him take it down, or something to that effect. I thought it was cool.

I thought I might have accidently stepped on your toes. I'm glad I was wrong.


Growing up on numerous Air Force, Navy and Army bases, I had the experience of being "buzzed" a few times. The scariest one was when I was about 6 years old. Riding home on my bike in the Nevada desert, I was coming home in the evening twilight and was buzzed .... BY BATS!


;P


I think I smoked bicycle tires getting home on that one.


;f

Bill Powell
09-19-2005, 20:54
I just re-read my answer, Scott, and it sounded stupid. It should have read more like it was a different era, a time when you could argue your case, and sometimes get away with it.

You cannot step on my toes by being part of the conversation, engineer. I wish more people would contribute, preferably with military or hunting stories.

Like for instance:

My brother had a friend named Sid who worked for a company that successfully bid on a surveying job south of Phoenix, by the Ajo gunnery range. This was a long time ago and the Arizona Air National Guard was flying F-100 Super Sabers, armed with 20mm cannon. They would send one of the runners way up the mountain to plant a flag, and when he would get about halfway down, the flag would get blown away by cannon fire. It got tougher and tougher to get guys to go back up that hill. This is just a side note. The actual story concerns one of the target planes.

Part of the gunnery range was a collection of obsolete planes to be used as target practice. Sitting there was a fairly intact F-94 all weather intercepter. One of the helpers climbed up into the forward cockpit of the aircraft and said, "Hey Sid, check it out, man, I'm a fighter pilot. I gotta bail out now.", and he pulled the ejection lever. WHOOMPFF. AAAAIIIIIEEEEE, AAAAIIIIEEEE He cleared the rudder by a few feet, and the seat dumped his ass in the desert about thirty feet behind the plane. The pilot's seat absorbed most of the impact, but they took him to the hospital for a check-up. You couldn't get his butt within thirty feet of a plane after that. You ever ride in an ejection seat? They seperate your ass from the pavement in a hurry.

Back to my brother-in-law Ted. His nephew stole a jet trainer from Williams AFB in Mesa, Ariz. and got away with it, mostly. His job was line maintenance, and after the pilot trainees got through having fun it was his job to service the plane, check the maintenance log, and taxi it over to the fuel pumps for a top off. He got to thinking more and more how unfair that was. He could fly better than those shave-tails. So, one day instead of taxiing back to the park line, he taxied out to an alternate runway and took off. He went up to Miami, Ariz. and buzzed the whole neighborhood. When the fuel got low he went back to Williams, landed, and taxied up to the police shack. End result was he had to buy the fuel, pay a fine, reduction in grade, (suspended), and he had to promise never to do that again. He came out smelling like a rose on that one. Oh, for those of you who like planes, it was a T-33.

freepatriot
09-20-2005, 07:03
Originally posted by Bill Powell
I just re-read my answer, Scott, and it sounded stupid. It should have read more like it was a different era, a time when you could argue your case, and sometimes get away with it.


:)


I only had to read your answer a second time to understand how you meant it, in the context of my question. Made perfect sense the second time.

:)

freepatriot
09-20-2005, 07:04
<---has not military or hunting stories, just questions that tend to start off other people's military or hunting stories.



:)

freepatriot
09-20-2005, 07:20
T-33?


http://www.mjgkramer.com/aircraft/T-33-02.jpg

Bill Powell
09-20-2005, 07:21
Luckily you're smarter than me, and can read what I mean rather than what I say. I gotta go now, see you this PM.

Bill Powell
09-20-2005, 07:24
That be him, or her. It's a variant of the old F-80 Shooting Star. It was eventually replaced by the T-38.

freepatriot
09-20-2005, 20:10
So did you heal the Jag?

Bill Powell
09-20-2005, 20:35
Yep, I did. Some had put in an auxiallary fan and wired it backwards. It was trying to push air throught the radiator from the rear, cancelling out ht incoming cooling air.

freepatriot
09-21-2005, 06:38
Bill,

If the storm (Rita) stays as powerful as it is, and comes at TX somewhere near Galveston, how badly do you think flooding and wind damage would be in Houston? Would the storm surge push up the San Jacinto? Is there adequate flooding protection from the river?

Just thinking about you

S ;c

Bill Powell
09-21-2005, 07:11
Houston is almost fifty miles inland, and I live on the northwest side of Houston. Any flooding we get will be from rain fall and not from storm surge. The San Jacinto is thirty miles east of me, and any effect on the river from the surge will not affect my family. Most of the towns affected by the storm surge would be extreme south Houston, and the small towns along the coast. I think we will be fine. One guy I know bought two generators yesterday. One was to keep the aerators running in the gold fish pond, and the other maybe for the kitchen appliances. He lives in the most exclusive part of town and the likelyhood of them being without power for any length of time is pretty remote.

I appreciate your concern.

iimagine
09-21-2005, 07:28
Originally posted by Bill Powell
Houston is almost fifty miles inland, and I live on the northwest side of Houston. Any flooding we get will be from rain fall and not from storm surge. The San Jacinto is thirty miles east of me, and any effect on the river from the surge will not affect my family. Most of the towns affected by the storm surge would be extreme south Houston, and the small towns along the coast. I think we will be fine. One guy I know bought two generators yesterday. One was to keep the aerators running in the gold fish pond, and the other maybe for the kitchen appliances. He lives in the most exclusive part of town and the likelyhood of them being without power for any length of time is pretty remote.

I appreciate your concern.
Bill,
After everything passes over offer to buy them generators off him cheap. he he he he he he! (Thats how I got mine!)
iimagine

Bill Powell
09-21-2005, 07:33
Once he no longer feels a need for the generators he will probably give them away.

freepatriot
09-21-2005, 08:28
Every year in FL a few people die of CO2 poisoning from their new Honda Generator in the garage

iimagine
09-21-2005, 09:22
Originally posted by Bill Powell
Once he no longer feels a need for the generators he will probably give them away. Be first in line! When I got mine, I traded up from what I had, passing mine to those family members less fortunate and deserving.
iimagine

iimagine
09-21-2005, 09:29
Originally posted by scottauld
Every year in FL a few people die of CO2 poisoning from their new Honda Generator in the garage Lesson 1. READ THE DIRECTIONS.
Lesson 2. FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS.
Lesson 3. KEEP THE DIRECTIONS HANDY AND RE-READ OFTEN.
Lesson 4. If 1,2, and 3 can't be followed, You can't fix stupid.

Seriously though, It is sad when Folks are just trying to get by and something like that happens. I know of several incidents where people were cooking when the power went out, They never shut the burners off, went to sleep, power came back on, the house burned down and They died in their sleep still in bed or on the couch.~sd
iimagine

Bill Powell
09-21-2005, 10:36
That's the age old law of natural selection at work. When people are concious they fight that law tooth and nail. That's why the 4-F's outnumber the 1-A's today. How many people remember those two physical descriptions?

iimagine
09-21-2005, 10:41
Originally posted by Bill Powell
That's the age old law of natural selection at work. When people are concious they fight that law tooth and nail. That's why the 4-F's outnumber the 1-A's today. How many people remember those two physical descriptions? I know about the F4's and A1's. Does that count. Always loved the Phantom and the Skyraiders.
iimagine

Bill Powell
09-21-2005, 10:46
If you are a 4-F you are too much of a physical wreck to get drafted. The 1-A's become cannon fodder and the 4-F's father the next generation.

freepatriot
09-21-2005, 18:03
Bill, I should tell you that there is a special Glock Talk rule. if a thread that you starts ever makes it to ten pages, you are required by Law of Eric to give a GI-issued M1911-A1 to any user who's login name is "scottauld"

Just thought I'd let you know.

Best,
scottauld ;c

Bill Powell
09-21-2005, 18:20
I guess I'd better say something filthy enough to get locked at about nine and a half pages, cause i sure don't have one o' them shootin' irons.

Besides, I didn't start it. Patricia made it what it is.

freepatriot
09-21-2005, 19:06
Originally posted by Bill Powell
I guess I'd better say something filthy enough to get locked at about nine and a half pages, cause i sure don't have one o' them shootin' irons.

Besides, I didn't start it. Patricia made it what it is.


That would be a riot if your thread got locked.

I was thinkin you still had a few from the junkpile at Musan-Ni stowed away in a pillowcase.

You started the thread, you were the first 'un to make a message. Patricia only stuck it at the top of the page.

;)

freepatriot
09-21-2005, 19:08
http://freepatriot.com/imagewarehouse/prewarcolt1911.jpg


(drool)

iimagine
09-21-2005, 20:19
Originally posted by scottauld
http://freepatriot.com/imagewarehouse/prewarcolt1911.jpg


(drool) Don't drool on it! That'll make it RUST!!
iimagine

Orkinmna903
09-21-2005, 20:19
Bill,

I just wanted to tell you that I'm thouroughly enjoying your stories of how Korea used to be. It's a lot different now or it was when i was there in 99'. You go to Seoul and it's like a dang ant hill. People crawling all over each other. Most of the younger generation there doesn't like Americans very much, but the older generations still remember why were there. Anyhow's keep the storie coming

Bill Powell
09-21-2005, 20:41
Where were you in Korea?

freepatriot
09-23-2005, 08:55
Bill, was there any nasty Typhoon-type storms or squalls when you were in Korea? Blizzards maybe?

Bill Powell
09-23-2005, 10:59
No where on earth that can get as hot as Korea in the summer can get as cold in the winter. One time we had to do guard duty while in the post office was while we were in the field. One night I stood four hours guard duty, outside, with the temperature hovering around twenty six degrees below zero. I had on every piece of winter gear that the army issued, plus some that was improvised. I looked like a mouldy Pillsbury Doughboy, cause I was all green. If someone had done something I would have to just stand and watch, cause I was not very mobile in my outfit. When the shift was over I pulled off my mickey mouse boots and poured about a pint of water out of each one. If something had happened that force me to dis-robe, I would have frozen like a popcycle.

It was called Operation Snow Tiger. As usual out there in that white snow and ice were our dark green tents, and trucks, covered in dark green camo net. I'm sure I looked like a green snowball.

It almost didn't take place because it was preceded by a white out that lasted a couple of days. This was the same field exercise where tank exploded that I talked about earlier..We had four cold related fatalities, and numerous cases of frost bite.

The following summer Korea was having it's best rice crop in fifty years. The monsoons came, and almost floated everything away. They lost most of their crop.

We had one typhoon that kicked the crap out of everything that wasn't nailed down.

The biggest one of all was the one we hit out in the middle of the Pacific. The ship I was on was the General Breckenridge. It was 647 feet long, 60 feet wide, and about 100 feet tall, at the top of the radar and radio masts. When we hit the storm I was at my post, on the port after gun deck, about 15 feet out from the side of the ship. Between me and the typhoon and the ocean was a half inch cable that I was hanging on to. I was watching waves break over the top of those masts and falling down on me. Sometimes the ship would roll so far to the left tha it seemed my deck was about to go in the water. The bow of the ship would go into the wall of a wave, and do it's best to make like a submarine for awhile. While this was happening the stern would be high in the air, with the propellers freewheeling. When I finally called in to ask about my relief, and they found out I was still on that deck, they sent a couple of guys out with lines tied to them to rescue me. I didn't need rescuing. I just needed permission to get off that deck. The weather went on for two days. I found out later they didn't normally drive into typhoons, but this one sort of surrounded them, and the only out of it was through it.

My brother use to live at King Cove, Alaska. He said he could sit on his porch and watch those massive typhoons being born. The warm Japan Current hit there, and the cold water from the Bering Strait hit there......

I've been in hurricanes in Mississippi, been around tornados in Okla., and typhoons in the Pacific, and given a choice I'll take clear weather every time.

When I left Korea, it was ten degrees an Inchon.

Bill Powell
09-23-2005, 11:15
Oh yeah, I forgot.

freepatriot
09-23-2005, 12:07
.

freepatriot
09-23-2005, 12:09
Like this?



http://freepatriot.com/imagewarehouse/flushdeck-02.jpg

http://freepatriot.com/imagewarehouse/flushdeck-03.jpg

http://freepatriot.com/imagewarehouse/flushdeck-04.jpg

Bill Powell
09-23-2005, 15:46
uss general jc breckenridge AP176 is a WW11 design. Google shows a long history for the ship, but the only picture will be shown in the next. I have to scan it, and then post it.

Bill Powell
09-23-2005, 15:51
Here it is in the realm of the Golden Dragon, (crossing the equator)

freepatriot
09-24-2005, 08:01
No pic, try again?

Bill Powell
09-24-2005, 08:22
Drat, did it again.

freepatriot
09-24-2005, 11:55
Another one?

http://www.ranger25.com/B%202%2012%20Dateline%20crossing.htm

freepatriot
09-24-2005, 11:57
Take two:

http://freepatriot.com/imagewarehouse/breckenridgecert.jpg

Bill Powell
09-24-2005, 13:35
I found one actual photo of it but I can't find it and I don't remember where I found it.

freepatriot
09-25-2005, 13:06
Good old Davey Jones, he's the only one that doesn't have to do any work around here.

Bill Powell
09-26-2005, 12:27
A couple from Germany while I recover from being fussed at by Eric and his cohorts.

While in Germany I drove for 37th Trans Com, 53rd battalion, 66th trucking company. As a transportation company we made a lot of ammo convoys.

Picture it: thirty five semi's in a convoy, MP jeep escort, run redlights, blow through towns, generally raising hell with the normal traffic. All this was done so we would be inconspicuous. To accomplish that they should have turned us loose one at a time and let us blend with traffic. Each semi is carrying 35,000 to 45,000 pounds of munitions.

Eddie Bragg was on one of our ammo convoys. We were between Mannheim and Kaiserslautern on a back road when Eddie went boogety-boogety, off the road, through the ditch, and out into a little field. We waited for him to come to the road while we waited for a wrecker.

Suddenly flame started up between his saddle fuel tanks and the front of the trailer. The trailer was loaded with 8inch howitzer rounds. We started yelling at Eddie to get out of the truck. We had to back up cause the flames were getting bigger, and involving the front of the trailer. We back away about one hundred fifty yard, which was not enough, couse about the time we stopped moving, something unimaginable happened. The front row of eight inch howitzer rounds exploded, and scattered rounds all over that field. The explosion blew the fire out.

With the nose plug, and without the fuse, those rounds were not supposed to do that. I don't dnow if they ever found out why they blew. We had to police up the scattered rounds. Pissed the Germans off, cause they had to evacuate the two closest towns. Two of the rounds landed in one of the towns, and one went through the windshield of the truck right behind me, which is why we were too close.

Bad day for Eddie...........Next, our permanent CQ

Of Eddie, we found five pounds of right inner thigh. The doctors made a positive I.D. of what part of the body it was.

Bill Powell
09-26-2005, 14:57
We had a permanent weekday CQ named Goins, a spec five. The reason Goins was permanent CQ (charge of quarters) was because of an ammo convoy going to Ramstein AFB, by Kaiserslautern.

When you deliver munitions to Ramstein AFB, you cross the main runway, turn right and drive along side the runway til you get to the road going to the ammo bunkers. Well, Goins turned one turn too quick, and wound up going down the center of the main runway. They had every chase truck on the flight line chasing him, trying to get him off the runway. They finally sent a follow me truck to get in front of him and lead him off the runway. The base commander said if he ever saw that guy on his air base again he would personally take his sidearm and shoot him.

So he was made permanent CQ.

Oh yeah, the reason for the extreme excitement was there was a crippled (burning engine) KC-135 about eight miles behind Goins, and he had one shot at that runway. A KC-135 is a giant airborne service station for mid-air refueling.

freepatriot
09-26-2005, 16:37
So you saw the KC land then?

Bill Powell
09-26-2005, 16:54
Yes I did. They had stopped the convoy two trucks in front of me because of the inflight emergency. The plane came in and made a normal landing, except for the smoke and flame on the starboard outboard engine. They had the foam trucks waiting for it so it was no big deal.

I didn't learn of Goins' exploits til we were able to cross the runway, and get over to the munitions bunkers. Disaster was averted with probably a full minute to spare.

freepatriot
09-27-2005, 09:14
Bill, what is your opinion of the Model M1911-A1 .45 ACP pistol?

Bill Powell
09-27-2005, 09:48
Another fine thing destroyed by the 1968 gun control act was the NRA citizen shooter program. That was where I got my only new 1911. It was a Remington Rand, new in the box, and it cost 19.95, plus postage. Springfields, M-1 carbines, and others were available under the same program, for the same price, all new.

How do I like the M-1911? The ideal gun, to me, is the 1911 with the .22 LR conversion kit. With the kit installed you have a little low end plinker, and rabbit getter. With the kit de-stalled (another new word) you have one of the best man killers ever designed.

My target, up on the hill behind my house, was a roughly man-sized rock about one hundred yards away. First round would hit it dead center, every time. Second shot would go a couple of feet to the right, and the third back on target, and the fourth a foot to the left. Anyway, you translate that hundred yards back to normal pistol range, and you have what would be classified as a straight shooter. It would not drive nails. I never asked it to. But on the close pistol range if that nail had a one and a half in head I could hit it with every round.

Yes I do like it. I've never felt the need for twenty rounds in a pistol. If seven rounds aint enough then you need a foo gas pit in front of you that you can ignite.

Two guns I like even more are the model 1917 colt army with that six in barrel, or the Smith and Wesson equivalent, in .45 or .44 S&W Special.

Oddly enough, I also like the Webley, in .455. You can shoot .45 auto in it, too.

One other thought on the .45 Auto. I have never, ever had a mal-function with one.

Bill Powell
09-27-2005, 11:14
Go to google web and type in critser 6.5mm express The very first hit is a list of just about all the rifle cartridges available the last 150 years, or so. Included in that list is the Critser 6.5mm express.

Carlos Critser was a gunsmith and retail gun dealer in Globe, Ariz as I was growing up. He was involved in gun design and development during the second world war.

The 6.5 mm Critser Express was a cartridge design that I was able to follow all the way through the design and delivery. When he built a custom rifle for a customer even the caliber was custom. The rifle was delivered with loaded rounds, some formed cases, and all the reloading tools necessary to load their own. All his custom rounds were base on the .300 H&H magnum. He would test fire his guns out the back door of the shop, in the city limits, and no swat teams showed up. I was able to fire the prototype rifle before it had a stock, and after.. He did several designs on the .300 H&H case, up to .45 caliber. The fifle was built for fairly flat trajectory shooting, up to about 800 yards. God, he had some neat stuff.

When Carlos was away, at guns shows, sales, etc, his father ran the store for him. One day while Carlos was away my friend and I wandered in to see if there was any new ammo in the grab bag. We were both ammo collectors. Sitting right on the front window sill was an un-opened box of 1852 Sharps paper case ammo, with the primers in a little side compartment. We discussed them with his father, telling him how old and probably worthless they were, and bought them for fifty cents a round. It was a ten round box.

We wandered in the next week, and he was talking to my brother, telling him about the crooks that conned his dad out of those rounds. He was promising all kinds of mayhem if he ever saw them. We'd never seen his dad but that one time, so we made it a point to stay out of the store when his old man was in town.

Carlos left Globe about the same time I did. He moved to Italy to build custom shotguns for the gentry. I miss that guy.

freepatriot
09-27-2005, 11:42
Originally posted by Bill Powell
How do I like the M-1911? The ideal gun, to me, is the 1911 with the .22 LR conversion kit. With the kit installed you have a little low end plinker, and rabbit getter. With the kit de-stalled (another new word) you have one of the best man killers ever designed.



You hear that Deb? Christmas is coming, the goose is getting fat.. please put a .22LR conversion kit in the old man's hat.

Bill Powell
09-27-2005, 12:03
Tell her to don't forget the ammo. You can't get .45's in that little converter barrel.

c-mama
09-27-2005, 12:05
Originally posted by scottauld
You hear that Deb? Christmas is coming, the goose is getting fat.. please put a .22LR conversion kit in the old man's hat. Our anniversary is coming - next week, in fact. You can just get me one of these. (http://www.cimarron-firearms.com/Sheriff.htm)

http://www.cimarron-firearms.com/images/NewSher.jpg

Bill Powell
09-27-2005, 12:13
That's the Sheriff's Model. You a sheriff?

c-mama
09-27-2005, 12:46
Originally posted by Bill Powell
That's the Sheriff's Model. You a sheriff? In a manner of speaking.

;f

CRider
09-27-2005, 12:47
Originally posted by Bill Powell
That's the Sheriff's Model. You a sheriff?

She's a mom...same thing ;f

c-mama
09-27-2005, 12:47
Originally posted by CRider
She's a mom...same thing ;f That's what I was sayin'. ;)

Bill Powell
09-27-2005, 12:53
Oh, well, never mind then.

freepatriot
09-27-2005, 12:58
Those single actions are SWEET and I actually had my eye on a couple for you for Anniv.

:)

c-mama
09-27-2005, 13:07
Originally posted by scottauld
Those single actions are SWEET and I actually had my eye on a couple for you for Anniv.

:) ;3 ;3 ~ks

Bill Powell
09-27-2005, 14:18
I finally realized I could rype freepatriot.com but when I tried to to click on to your submit a story thingie, my computer went into shut down mode.

Bill Powell
09-27-2005, 16:46
Seeing that little single action reminded of an event involving my brother when he was a Pinal County Mounty, in Arizona.

Living by Hayden, Ariz was a family of red head, fair complected, freckled, green eyed Mexicans, and their name was Smith. Somewhere, years ago, in Mexico, a gringo named Smith got tangled up in their ancestral woodpile. There was not three words of English spoken by all five members of the clan.

One evening my brother was dispatched on a call, shots fired. Well, he rolled and was gone foorr aa llooonnngg tttimmmee, so, not being able to get him on the radio, the rest of the local law rolled. When they got to the address my brother was standing beside the car, trying to get the door open with a coat hanger. While they were discussing getting the door open, a shot rang out up the hill. All the officers started yelling, in Cops TV show fashion for him to freeze and drop it, all at the same time. My brother told them they could not yell loud enough for him to learn English. My brother yelled up to the shooter in Spanish to go ahead and drop his gun, and they could go up and get it before it rained. It was an old ragged assed lever action, in .38-40 caliber. Jesus dropped the carbine, and wandered on down, too drunk to realize he was on his way to the pokey.

The old man was hiding in the rocks, waiting for him to run out of bullets, and he came down.

I always liked the .38-40. It was hotter than the .44-40. It is considered by some to be the direct ancestor of the modern 10mm.