Hey Again! Quick Question about video [Archive] - Glock Talk

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g_man500a
11-09-2005, 18:29
Hey guys,

I'm still alive(just real busy). Sorry I haven't been around much. I still check back in occasionally, but don't usually have a whole lot that I can say.

Anyways, I bought the video "Ride Like A Pro III" at the recommendation of Texas T in this thread: http://glocktalk.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=455842 and I just had a quick question, or series of questions about the same thing rather.

He talks about staying in the friction zone while doing slow speed manuevers. I have known about the technique of staying in the friction zone of the clutch for quite some time now, but he also talks about keeping minor pressure on the rear brake while doing slow speed stuff. My question is, does keeping pressure on the rear brake really help that much? Does it apply to sportbikes as well(the video consisted of nothing but cruisers). Would it wear your rear brake out real quick to ride it like that?

That's about it as far as the questions go :) A general update is that I am FINALLY getting a bike. It's taken me forever to be ready to get one, but the time has come and I already have one that I plan to get, I just need to do some final financing stuff, and then it's all set. It's a 2001 Katana 750. I know..a lot of people don't like Katanas, but in my search of a good semi-first bike I came across them and started doing research and liked what I found.

I hope everybody is doing well. I'll try and be around a bit more, and I will definately be checking back to see replies to this thread:)

fnfalman
11-09-2005, 18:48
Yes, that rear brake trick really works well at slow maneuver. It allows you to put power on the ground yet still keeps the speed down.

Texas T
11-09-2005, 19:21
Originally posted by g_man500a
My question is, does keeping pressure on the rear brake really help that much? Does it apply to sportbikes as well(the video consisted of nothing but cruisers). Would it wear your rear brake out real quick to ride it like that?
1. Yes. You don't want to be applying the front brake in a low speed manuevering condition or you'll be doing a face plant to the low side.
2. Yes. It applies to all bikes.
3. No. You will only be doing this in a low speed manuevering situation - such as parking lots. In normal low speed riding such as stop and go traffic your front wheel is going to be pointed forward and thus use of the front brake would be okay.

Glad you liked the video. I felt it helped me a lot. The explanations/demonstrations were better than my MSF class.

Dandapani
11-09-2005, 19:48
Originally posted by fnfalman
Yes, that rear brake trick really works well at slow maneuver. It allows you to put power on the ground yet still keeps the speed down.

+100! You can make freaking square corners that way ;z ;a ;z

g_man500a
11-10-2005, 11:36
Is keeping some pressure on the rear brake a way of just having the power available if you need it, to where you just have to release the brake? I'm just trying to grasp the concept. I'm sure it'll all make sense in a couple weeks when I get the bike out into a parking lot and spend some time trying this stuff, but as much information as I can get before hand is always a good thing.

When using that method, do you just keep the clutch stationary once you get it in a good spot and then use the brake to moderate your speed? Or do you have to use both?

Thanks again guys.

Oh, here's a picture of the bike I am getting for anybody interested:)

http://katriders.com/forums/download.php?id=3053

fnfalman
11-10-2005, 14:52
When you keep the rear brake slightly engaged, you have to use throttle more, so in effect you are putting power to the ground to keep the bike up yet you're not going too fast because the brake keeps the speed in check.

You use both your clutch's friction zone, your throttle and your rear brake modulation at the same time and some combination thereof in order to make those slow speed maneuvers. Practice, practice, practice.

But you said, "well, in the real world, I can always put my feet down." Wrong! In the real world, on heavy congestion, putting your legs down is a good way to get your feet ran over or your shins jammed up against another car or barrier. That's why the MSF preaches so much about keeping your feet on the pegs.

Ask how I know about the part with the shins getting pinned against something.;) Sometimes it takes a real life experience to be convinced that the MSF people actually know something about street riding. We're not talking about track or canyon cutting here. We're talking about mundane street riding techniques.

TimP
11-11-2005, 10:08
Yeah, you really learn to do it on steep trails riding a dirt bike. I can remember many times when I have had to go to 30-50% throttle for the power, but had to use the brake/clutch because I didnt need the speed.

Thats one of those things you NEVER hear anyone tell new riders.

FNFAL: Lance got all his stuff Tuesday! We ended up getting over $500 for Lance and his guys. Boots, clothing, toiletry stuff, chest rigs, holster, mag pouches, camelbacks etc etc etc. I had a few companies donate stuff to them, and others gave money. Thanks again for your help! I owe ya one! ;c

ateamer
11-11-2005, 14:02
Riders putting their feet on the ground while the bike is moving is a pet peeve of mine. Good way to sprain or break an ankle, or get a spiral fracture of the leg. The only time the feet touch the ground is after the bike has come to a complete stop. It isn't difficult to be stopped for three or four seconds with the feet on the pegs.

fnfalman
11-12-2005, 15:34
TimP,

I'm glad to hear that Lance and his guys got the stuff.

I also agree with Ateamer about riding around with your feet touching the ground, especially in traffic. I didn't pay attention and almost got my shin knocked off when I tried to maneuver by one of those bollards at the gas station. The MSF boys have a pretty good reason for devising their riding course the way it is.

g_man500a
11-13-2005, 19:28
Hey guys,


Thanks for the information. I will get out in a lot somewhere and try this stuff.

When you say it keeps more power on the ground, do you mean that with the engine being slightly revved up, it's producing more power and you are using the clutch to modulate how much of that is on the ground at any one point and then using the brake to control your speed?

I know about the legs down thing. Idealy, I will have my legs up as soon as the bike starts moving. I think the only time I'll keep them down is if I'm going through something that I'm afraid of losing traction on (sand and gravel, both of which I have in my driveway)

I'm going to pick up the bike next weekend. I'm pretty excited about it. I'm ready to get riding!