HF antenna help [Archive] - Glock Talk

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lomfs24
12-24-2005, 12:39
I just bought an estate sale....everything... for a good price. One of the things that I got was a Kenwood TS-850S. I am a tech so I won't be able to get on the air with it for a while. One of the other things that I got was an antenna. I haven't actually torn the antenna down from where it is located yet. But it's a beam antenna with about 7 elements and it's supposed to cover several bands. I don't know if I want to put it up at my house. In the sale I also got a tower. It's about a 30 or 40' tower and I am thinking I don't really want that thing in my back yard.

What are my other options. Is that antenna too big to put on my roof on a roof type tripod kind of thing? How high would it have to be above the roof of my house? My house being a single story modular home.

I am also open to some other antenna options. Remember, at this point in the game I am only interested in listening because I am not able to actually transmit. I would be interested in knowing what I could do to maybe not even have an antenna outside at this point but rather some kind of wire strung inside? Maybe even interested in wire type antenna's that would go outside.

I am conpletely open to suggestions.

R. Emmelman
12-24-2005, 14:54
The problem with mounting a multi-band antenna on the roof is the wind-loading. Antennas have a wind-loading number that represents the amount of surface the antenna represents to the wind. An antenna that has 15 sq/ft would be equivelent to having a 15 sq/ft board aganst the wind. Most roofs can not handle the stress. Hope this helps.

Rich WI9NDY / AFA1CY

king catfish
12-24-2005, 22:20
Maybe you should just "expand your horizons". Maybe learn to weld or something. That's what I learned from TheBigCA and VOB. They were very helpful.

lomfs24
12-25-2005, 02:16
;z ;z ;z

Yeah, I saw that in the other thread. I don't know if you saw my anwer in that thread or not.


Unlike your situtation, I have three and four day weekends depending on the week so I have time to learn soldering and learn how to expand my horizons. And I really wouldn't mind doing that for my own experience.



I am not saying you should, I am saying I want to.


Like I said in the other thread, you should get a mounting bracket for the gable end of your house and throw up a mobile antenna. Quick, dirty, durable, and more importantly... it works.

martho
12-26-2005, 12:14
For a general and simple option, a multi band vertical and a 80m dipole would give you a fantastic listening station. It will be a decent transmit setup once you upgrade.

Having both a vertical and a horizontal antenna will give you two options for your receive. Many times a signal is stronger on the vert than it is on the wire and vice versa. A used multiband vertical usually will cover 10/12/15/17/20/30/40 and are reasonably priced in the used market. For $150 or so, you could have a pretty good multiband vertical. As for the 80m dipole, that would be pretty cheap($10 or so) to build and the length of each side is not critical. Approx 66' on a side would be good enough.

The beam is a great antenna and if you put it up on a tower, you are going to far exceed the capabilities of the vertical and wires on 10m - 20m. However, if you want simple, think about the vert and wire.

As for a wire in your attic or in the house, it can be done, but the results will be disappointing.

R. Emmelman
12-26-2005, 12:33
Back when I was renting a houst I ran a 100' wire in a big loop in the attic. That and a tuner got me on HF with somewhat good results. Worked Sout America on a sched for quite awhile as well as MARS (the service not the planet :)) I now have 75' streatched out my back door and a VersaTuner.

73 de WI9NDY

sensei
12-26-2005, 14:32
If that radio has a built in tuner or if you got an external tuner in the deal you are in great shape.

I ran an diploe with 66' legs on each side and I can work all freqs. with no problems. Total cost was probably $15.

The higher the apex the better.

If you have size restraints just do the same thing with 33' legs and you will have everthing except 80 meters.

I even put up a 40 meter dipole in my attic and it works good, although certainly not as good as the outside one, which is 40' high.

There are lots of other ways to do things. These are just a few suggestions.

If you just want to listen you don't really need the tuner although it helps.

My suggestion is go ahead and upgrade. It's not that hard and is well worth the effort.

sensei

edited to add: as mentioned already, loops are great also. Maybe the best I have ever used. To get on all bands with a loop and a tuner I have found the length has to be at least 240'. Altouugh this may depend on the quality of the tuner.

Flapdog
01-24-2006, 13:35
I think everyone is on the money about running wire antennas, especially the horizontal loops. I am a QRP operator, usually running 500mW or less (CW), and not long ago worked a fellow in Maine who was also QRP (Im in northern CA). I was using a 7 element triband yagi up about 60 feet, which is a decent setup for QRP work. The operator in Maine was running a loop antenna in his attic. We got to playing around to see how low we could go and still communicate. He was able to hear me down to 25mW on his little old attic loop. So with a simple horizontal loop you should do well, when you consider that most hams you hear will be running at least 100 Watts, and a good many much more.

If you check the ARRL website, you can find books on wire antennas for a reasonable price, and they will give you lots of ideas with which to work.

Go for the upgrade. 5 wpm is really not bad once you get working on it, and you will really enjoy your TS850!

73, Flaps

MAGAZAGU
02-05-2006, 22:10
You may be able to use just half of the driven element of your rather large sounding beam to simply listen to HF. Ground mounted vertically with radials tuned to the bands you want it would be a fine starter antenna.

The transceiver you got is a good one.

Listen to the CW bands. Learning that particular skill is like learning a language. You get better based on time spent.

lomfs24
02-06-2006, 07:10
Originally posted by MAGAZAGU
You may be able to use just half of the driven element of your rather large sounding beam to simply listen to HF. Ground mounted vertically with radials tuned to the bands you want it would be a fine starter antenna.

The transceiver you got is a good one.

Listen to the CW bands. Learning that particular skill is like learning a language. You get better based on time spent. Yeah, I have been working on CW, but with my current antenna configuration I don't seem to get any CW and very little voice. But I will get there.

VOB
02-18-2006, 15:46
Originally posted by king catfish
Maybe you should just "expand your horizons". Maybe learn to weld or something. That's what I learned from TheBigCA and VOB. They were very helpful.

Hey King Catfish, I just came across this - have I offended you in some way? If so, please accept my apologies, and please understand that no offense was intended.