Specific law [Archive] - Glock Talk

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GSD17
05-25-2006, 19:51
Does anyone know the specific law code in the part 97 relating to modifying ham radios to TX on commercial/public safety. I am trying to prove to someone that it is illegal, but cannot find the specific code.

EUPHER49
05-26-2006, 23:08
I'm not sure of the specific regulation, in fact it may not even be in Part 97, but I think your answer may be in "Type Acceptance."

I think that Ham equipment needs no type acceptance, which is why one can modify commercial rigs for use in ham bands. However the other radio services require type acceptance. Since ham rigs have none it would be illegal to modify and transmit on bands outside of the Amateur Service.

I haven't done the research but I think this will put you on the right track. And for what it's worth I think you'll win your argument. :)

GSD17
05-27-2006, 07:25
The deal is, I found a radio for sale here at GT... the guy says it has been moded in the description... I said something and they deleted MY post. So I PMed the moderator to tell him I was right, he has asked in the thread about it, but no responses. I dont want to get the guy in trouble, but you never know what nimrod might buy the radio and cause some trouble, or have the FCC get a little hot about it.

teeuu
05-27-2006, 12:25
I'm not sure that the modification per se is against the rules. Transmitting on commercial frequencies is a violation, of course, for a number of reasons; there's the above-mentioned type acceptance, for one, and there's always the old standby: your amateur license doesn't authorize you to transmit in that band.

Even if someone was authorized to transmit on a commercial frequency, the amateur equipment would not be allowed due to, once again, type acceptance.

What it boils down to is this: although it may not be a rule violation to perform the modification to allow amateur equipment to transmit on a commercial band, there is no legitimate reason to do so because the equipment cannot be legally used in such a manner.

R. Emmelman
05-27-2006, 13:53
teeuu is correct. Nothing in part 97 but if you transmit that would violate the rules governing the band you transmit in (i.e. comercial, marine, etc.) Many ham radios are modified to transmit out of band (I have two) for MARS/CAP use. MARS/CAP are not regulated by the FCC but by NTIA (National Telecommunications and Information Administration) http://www.ntia.doc.gov/

Rich WI9NDY / AFA1CY

martho
05-29-2006, 18:06
What it boils down to is this: although it may not be a rule violation to perform the modification to allow amateur equipment to transmit on a commercial band, there is no legitimate reason to do so because the equipment cannot be legally used in such a manner.

Remember that in order for some of the radios to get extended RX capabilities, a mod must be completed. Unfortunately, they also get extended TX with the same mod and dont have a choice. The Alinco DJ series of talkies had that issue.

R. Emmelman
05-29-2006, 18:39
Originally posted by martho
--- snip ---

Remember that in order for some of the radios to get extended RX capabilities, a mod must be completed. Unfortunately, they also get extended TX with the same mod and dont have a choice. The Alinco DJ series of talkies had that issue.
They must have fixed that in the newer versions. My DJ596 MK-II receives the extended band without the modification. I did modify my IC718 for full band TX (MARS) as well as my FT2600M (MARS also).

On another subject, W9IMS was on the air this weekend (Indianapolis Motor Speedway). I worked them on 40-meters. Needless to say they were loud and clear! (The IMS is about 20 miles from me.)

Binky .357
05-29-2006, 19:02
There is, however, the long-standing "gentlemans agreement" that says, in a situation where there's an immediate threat to life or limb, HAMs can use whatever frequency at their disposal to summon help.

How do I interpret this (IANAL)?

Where I live the nearest house is usually at least a quarter to half a mile away. I work grave shift and oftentimes drive alone, therefore, there is noone to send for help. The odds of another car coming along are slim, at best. To compound this, there is an odd cellphone blackout area about five miles in radius from my house.

If it really comes down to a life or death situation, I (and I would assume anyone needing aid) would feel fairly secure knowing that I could use the local LEOs Info or Car to Car channels to call for immediate assistance while I get out of my car to render aide.

Also, take into consideration that in a true disaster, cell phone service may be knocked out. Many of todays landline phones require some form of AC power to function and are thus disabled in the event of a blackout.

If it means saving a life, I'm gonna have the potential to transmit on an "unauthorized frequency"... If it ever comes down to needing the ability to use that potential, (god forbid) I'll take full responsibility for and face full legal ramifications for having used a police band frequency to save a life with head held high and shoudlers back.

Many people don't realize what an asset HAMs can be in the event of a natural (or man-made) disaster. Most LEOs, however, do.

The ease with which radios are modified also gives incentive to the good ones among us to practice our RDF (or "foxhunting") skills to track rogue transmitters to the house or area they transmit from.

Incidentally, the group I work with was one able to track a hidden operator from the center of Burnsville to the parking lot he was in in Farmington (Turns out to be a circle roughly 11 miles in radius-someone wanna give me a hand with the math for the search area of that circle?) of a combination of Suburban and Rural roads and areas in less than 15 minutes. Even the transmitting operator was impressed.

I guess the mentality that comes with having an "open" radio, and the responsiblity that comes with it is akin to having a CCL... you hope you never have to use it, but when the need comes it may save a life.