lead or FMJ or plated for a glock [Archive] - Glock Talk

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jimbullet
05-31-2006, 02:40
I believe there has been several conflicting reports on whether or not we should use lead ammo in glock barrels. It seems to be safe, we ought to stay out of lead ammo. My question however is I've seen several local manufactured ammo in the Phils where it seems they are not really FMJ but copper plated bullets. Are these also safe for Glocks?

Django
05-31-2006, 03:58
Depends on where you get your plated bullets. Some are so soft that you're better off using plain lead bullets. I find Stronghand's plated bullets soft and leads my G17 barrel a lot.

9MX swears by his plated bullets and uses them extensively without any negative effects on his barrel.

For me, the so called "teflon" heads (they're not real teflon coated)are a lot better than the copper plated ones.

jimbullet
05-31-2006, 06:27
Where would be the best place to buy good copper plated ammo? Those that are not too soft? Or rather, what brand would you guys recommend?

pogie45
05-31-2006, 07:38
Originally posted by jimbullet
I believe there has been several conflicting reports on whether or not we should use lead ammo in glock barrels. It seems to be safe, we ought to stay out of lead ammo. My question however is I've seen several local manufactured ammo in the Phils where it seems they are not really FMJ but copper plated bullets. Are these also safe for Glocks?

I shot hundreds of lead reloads on my Glock 21 & Glock 17 with no problems. For each 50 rounds that I shoot, the last 5 rounds will be FMJs. If I shoot a hundred, the last 10 will be FMJs. The FMJs cleans out the lead residue in the barrel. Just make sure to clean the barrel after each range visit.

Kiddo
05-31-2006, 08:08
I have heard conflicting reports that shooting FMJs after lead would instead flatten or make the lead stick more on the barrel wall (like a steamroller) rather than shaving it out. Is there an actual study which proves/disproves one from the other?

jimbullet
05-31-2006, 09:12
Well, its true for the 1911s, the last few rounds if shot with an FMJ, would definitely clean the barrel. Its not true that it would flatten the lead. The rounds will push it out. Im just a little bit more concerned over the glocks since Im sure everyone has heard of the KBs in the US. Most definitely I dont want that to happen. And these gunstores have been advertising not to shoot lead or teflon coz it will ruin the barrel which may lead to KBs

Blitzer
05-31-2006, 09:21
Searching on GT will rsult in many warnings NOT to use lead or plated bullets. You safety, your choice.

You have been given fair warning, GLOCK says not to do it.

:stop:

Buy the way "running" a FMJ bullets down a leaded bore will only increase the risks of overpressure and failure of the weapon. The lead is compressed and not removed by the FMJ bullets. Use a bronze brush and Hoppes #9 solvent and see what kind of lead crud scapes off the inside of your barrel after 200 rounds of lead bullets. :shocked:


Again it's you ass on the line. :upeyes:

charlie-xray
05-31-2006, 12:09
I would not dare use LEAD or copper plated LEADS on my Glock, it's NOT worth saving the pennies while eventually destroying the thousand worth pesos of Barrel. Even the manual from Glock says it.

win231
05-31-2006, 13:16
I've fired at least 8,500 plated handloads in my 6 glocks. There may be some confusion about copper plated vs copper wash bullets. I only use the plated bullets from Berry's or West coast. You can tell a copper wash bullet by its rough finish which looks like a copper-colored cast lead bullet. A copper wash bullet leaves lead residue like a lead bullet so it may not be safe in Glocks. A copper plated bullet doesn't leave any more residue than a copper jacketed bullet. Plated bullets have velocity limitations - around 1100 fps according to some manufacturers. Also no heavy roll crimps which can cut through the plating. For handloading 9mm with plated bullets, I use the 124 or 147 gr. which keeps the velocity below 1100 fps & still functions in a Glock.

Like any manufacturer, Glock has to warn against all handloads due to liability issues since they have no way of knowing how safe your handloads are.

vega
05-31-2006, 15:15
Originally posted by charlie-xray
I would not dare use LEAD or copper plated LEADS on my Glock, it's NOT worth saving the pennies while eventually destroying the thousand worth pesos of Barrel. Even the manual from Glock says it.
I must have a different manual. What page does it says not to use lead or copper plated bullets?

Django
05-31-2006, 20:29
Originally posted by win231
. . .There may be some confusion about copper plated vs copper wash bullets. I only use the plated bullets from Berry's or West coast. You can tell a copper wash bullet by its rough finish which looks like a copper-colored cast lead bullet. A copper wash bullet leaves lead residue like a lead bullet so it may not be safe in Glocks. A copper plated bullet doesn't leave any more residue than a copper jacketed bullet. Plated bullets have velocity limitations - around 1100 fps according to some manufacturers. Also no heavy roll crimps which can cut through the plating. For handloading 9mm with plated bullets, I use the 124 or 147 gr. which keeps the velocity below 1100 fps & still functions in a Glock.

Thanks for the clarification between copper wash and copper plated bullets as well the info on handloading plated bullets win231. :)

batangueno
05-31-2006, 20:53
Shooting lead is ok for glocks as long as you clean the barrel every couple of hundred rounds. Shooting fmj after a number of lead rounds, :nono:.

jimbullet
05-31-2006, 22:18
Its kinda difficult removing lead even if you use outers products and brush with a brass. I dont know but this might be better of in a separate topic but just wanted to ask, I heard several people using gasoline or was that kerosene to soak the barrels before scrubbing them. Dont know though if this is a good idea and Ive never tried it myself too.

Kiddo
05-31-2006, 22:50
All I know is that kerosene acts as a degreaser, which will take out the oils and probably will soften the powder residue. I don't know if it will make cleaning the lead out easier though. Can anyone chime in?

PD1017
05-31-2006, 22:57
Soaking and scrubbing w/ unleaded gasoline is usually recommended to get the lead out of the barrel but I havent use it yet either.

Well, the problem with lead bullets is one of the main reasons why I am hesitant to buy a Glock. Some say that using synthetic motor oil to lube the barrel will minimize lead fouling.

Kiddo
05-31-2006, 23:12
Were there any tests which could verify that using gasoline/kerosene will make lead cleaning easier?

sundancekid
05-31-2006, 23:13
how about those bore scrubber brand bore cleaner? are they any good in clearing lead fouling on the barrel?

chocoboy
06-01-2006, 02:47
Yup... Me and my bro use kerosene all the time to clean all of our guns. Even my dad uses kerosene for his gun... And its been his practice ever since. What we do is fill a pail with kerosene (1/3 full actually). Then we dissamble our guns and dunk everything in the pail. Leave it there for 10 to 15min. If you rarely clean your gun... U can leave it longer... My dad leaves his guns dunked overnite. After that, brush everything with a tooth brush or any soft brush. U can see the barrels are realy clean like new. Let dry for a couple of min or an hour. Using an air compressor would be easier. Lubricate and assemble. Oh by d way, the used kerosene can be re-used... Just let it stand for a couple of days and u'll see the leads on the bottom of the pail. The kerosene should be back to its clear form.

vega
06-01-2006, 08:24
Originally posted by PD1017
Some say that using synthetic motor oil to lube the barrel will minimize lead fouling.
Do you mean inside the bore? Not a good practice. Bore should be dry when shooting. I read somewhere that it increases the pressure if the bore is lubed. Someone correct me please.

jimbullet
06-01-2006, 08:45
I could only surmise that kerosene evaporates very quickly anyway...

chocoboy
06-01-2006, 09:52
do not lube inside the bore... just lube outside of barrel and the usual places (contact points)...

pogie45
06-01-2006, 23:01
Originally posted by jimbullet
Its kinda difficult removing lead even if you use outers products and brush with a brass...

If you finish your lead shooting session with FMJs, you will not have to worry about lead fouling when cleaning after each range time. Try to shoot using just lead, then clean your gun. On your next range time, shoot lead, finish with FMJs, and then clean your gun. There will be a big difference in the amount of lead removed from the bore. Please try this & post your result.

pogie45
06-01-2006, 23:11
Originally posted by chocoboy
do not lube inside the bore... just lube outside of barrel and the usual places (contact points)...

I always lube my bores with FP-10 after cleaning. I just run a pacth to dry it out before shooting. Never had any pressure issues. FP-10 makes cleaning after shooting easier.

MRV_G17
06-01-2006, 23:49
how about using diesel instead of kerosene?

jimbullet
06-02-2006, 18:26
I had tried shooting about 300 rds of lead (thru my 1911) then run at least 5 FMJs, it does work. The lead fouling is minimized and its much easier to clean the bore. Swab and brush it a little and its all like new.

win231
06-02-2006, 19:09
A bronze brush is not effective for cleaning lead out of a barrel.
What is fast & easy is to wrap a piece of copper mesh (the type found in supermarkets)tightly around a bronze brush & run it through the barrel DRY. You won't believe how much lead comes out. It can't harm the barrel because the copper is much softer than the steel in the barrel. I got this info from Bill Wilson's video that came with my CQB. I've tried it on a badly leaded Ruger GP-100 & it works fast.

I don't understand why anyone would want to put up with lead bullets when plated bullets are not much more expensive. ($57.00/1,000)The lead gets the whole gun much dirtier, including the firing pin channel, frame, etc.