Pinoy S.O.F. [Archive] - Glock Talk

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paltik45
06-10-2006, 12:27
Well I guess they cant hide it no more. As we all know security contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan is a very lucrative business. Most contrators prefer ex-military and police personel or anybody that has a military background. Before, they employ Brits, Canadian, US personel basicaly military from first world countries. But later on several companies start hiring Ex-military personel from south America like columbia, Mexico and El Salvador. They saw their capabilities and combat experience. Now, they added personel from south east Asia and from the Balkan states. Pinoy soldiers are very much qualified for this kind of role in Iraq. The Pinoy soldiers and other military personel from the Phil. can quickly adapt to the tactics being employed by the Iraqi insurgents. I am not surprised to see that segment from TV patrol world about the Pinoy SOF in Iraq. I dont know if it is true that there are an estimated 1,000 Pinoy SOF in Iraq alone. This doesnt include the regular OFW's I even read an article about a security contractor in Iraq who has a Pinoy ret. Gen(Marines) as their Operations Manager in Iraq. Well, who wouldnt bite the bait. The regular "security personel"(Third world country) earns $2000 a month and depends if you are a high ranking official plus experience. An ex-US Navy SEAL erns $4000 to $5000 per contract that doesnt include the sign-on bonus. AFAIK, even major US and British companies like McDonnel douglas and Haliburton ventured into this line of business. So as the days goes by we will see more Pinoy ex-military and AWOL's in Iraq just to support their families back home.:freak:

PMMA97
06-10-2006, 16:35
An interesting idea but would the Philippine government not want their share on the pay of these Pinoy mercenaries? After all the AFP is demanding a 40% share on salaries of Pinoy UN peacekeeping forces. 40%! That's plain higway robbery if you ask me.

blueeagle
06-10-2006, 18:52
i guess they can also be called OFWs!:laughabove:

paltik45
06-10-2006, 21:18
Originally posted by blueeagle
i guess they can also be called OFWs!:laughabove:

Yes they are OFW'S (Overseas Fighting Workers ;)

isuzu
06-10-2006, 21:27
IMHO $2,000 is quite a conservative amount even for a security official from a third world country operating in Iraq. I've seen a feature on "security consultants" operating in Iraq that they get between $5,000-$10,000/month, depending on your experience and the "company" that hires you.

Glock_19_9x19
06-10-2006, 21:42
Heard the rumour circulating about Blackwater setting up shop in Subic to recruit Pinoys for Iraq/Afghanistan?
Saw it in ANC News the other day.
Blackwater USA (http://www.blackwaterusa.com/)

isuzu
06-11-2006, 10:38
Originally posted by PMMA97
An interesting idea but would the Philippine government not want their share on the pay of these Pinoy mercenaries? After all the AFP is demanding a 40% share on salaries of Pinoy UN peacekeeping forces. 40%! That's plain higway robbery if you ask me.

I find this ridiculous! If you were to embark on a UN Peacekeeping mission, you have to be ready to spend and not get anything in return. Taking 40% off the poor soldiers' salary is just a dumb idea. Joining a peace mission with a higher salary is the soldier's chance to save and buy something for his or her family. Like some PNP personnel I know who went to Cambodia and who were under the command of a good friend of mine. My good friend advised them on what to do with their salary and a lot of them were able to start a small business or buy their family a house after they came back.

PMMA97
06-11-2006, 14:46
Originally posted by isuzu
I find this ridiculous! If you were to embark on a UN Peacekeeping mission, you have to be ready to spend and not get anything in return. Taking 40% off the poor soldiers' salary is just a dumb idea. Joining a peace mission with a higher salary is the soldier's chance to save and buy something for his or her family. Like some PNP personnel I know who went to Cambodia and who were under the command of a good friend of mine. My good friend advised them on what to do with their salary and a lot of them were able to start a small business or buy their family a house after they came back.

From the Manila Times.

Friday, May 19, 2006


EDITORIAL

Peacekeepers’ allowance


Living up to our commitment to the United Nations to help restore peace and order in troubled countries, the Philippines has sent troops to join UN peacekeeping efforts in parts of the world.

The Philippines has the largest troop contribution to UN peacekeeping in Southeast Asia—548, of whom 374 are from the Armed Forces of the Philippines and 174 from the Philippine National Police.

A soldier or policeman in a UN peacekeeping mission faces life-threatening risks 24 hours a day. Our troops are assigned mostly to countries racked by civil wars. In violence-plagued Haiti, a Filipino peacekeeper, S/Sgt. Antonio Batomalaque, was killed in a clash between his UN unit and a roving street gang. He is a global hero. He was awarded a posthumous UN medal.

What draws our soldiers to join the UN peacekeeping force is the cash incentive. Each peacekeeper is given US$1,000 (over P50,000) monthly as “troop cost allowance,” in addition to his monthly salary, which the AFP or PNP continues to pay.

Given their lowly economic plight, most Filipino soldiers will volunteer to join the UN force, attracted to the dollar allowance. For many years Filipino peacekeepers have enjoyed getting the dollar allowance they richly deserve in addition to their regular AFP wage. Much of the troops allowance goes to their families to uplift them from poverty.

Recently, however, the AFP announced a move to get 40 percent of their dollar allowance to recover the cost of their “deployment.” The deployment cost refers to expenses in training them for service abroad and in providing them with uniforms and communication equipment.

This AFP move has jolted our men in the UN peacekeeping force. Taking 40 percent of their troop allowance means a monthly loss of $400 from their UN income.

The plan to deduct from the Filipino peacekeepers’ money has stirred up a controversy between the military and the Department of Foreign Affairs. The DFA’s United Nations and International Organization division has complained that it was not consulted by the AFP on the matter.

Director Jesus Domingo of the UNIO’s international, political, legal and security affairs section describes the pay cut as “contrary to the framework and guidelines set for Philippine participation in UN peacekeeping efforts.”

Of course, news of the AFP plan, which is supposed to take effect in January next year, was received with pain and disbelief by Filipino members of the UN peacekeeping force and their families.

The AFP’s reason for taking 40 percent of the troop allowance is mean, embarrassing, self-defeating and maybe even unpatriotic. It claims that it spends as much as P4 million when it sends a 165-man peacekeeping force for a six-month stint with the UN. It says much of it is spent on the training of soldiers before deployment.

The Philippines, like many other countries, is bound by our commitment to the UN to serve the cause of world peace. We have pledged to help in the global fight against terrorism. We send our soldiers to embattled nations through the UN peacekeeping force to keep our solemn pledge and to show a dignified face to the world.

We should not show the world how petty the Philippine military command is, how willing it is to beggar soldiers who go abroad.

The military high command does not have the respect of a segment of the officer corps and the rank and file. This is admitted by some of the top generals themselves. This AFP plan to take a bite from the overseas income of our soldiers contributed to the UN missions will add to the ugliness of the generals in the eyes of some of the soldiers they command.

blueeagle
06-12-2006, 05:05
mga sir, ang tawag d'yan ay KOTONG!!!:soap:

quick
06-12-2006, 23:03
Originally posted by PMMA97
From the Manila Times.

Friday, May 19, 2006


EDITORIAL

Peacekeepers’ allowance

Recently, however, the AFP announced a move to get 40 percent of their dollar allowance to recover the cost of their “deployment.” The deployment cost refers to expenses in training them for service abroad and in providing them with uniforms and communication equipment.



have they no shame?

alpha1g23
06-14-2006, 19:42
first ive been hearing bout this matter 3yrs ago akala ko one of the guys joke, totoo pala...

royal glockster
06-16-2006, 21:53
Originally posted by quick
have they no shame?

YES!, indeed, they don't have shame at all!!:laughabove:

magister
06-22-2006, 18:04
in a newscast last night, tv patrol i think, filipino soldiers were interviewed and asked why they wanted to work as s.o.f.. obviously most of them said it was for the pay. lets face it. a lowly private earns a basic pay of around 5500 pesos a mo. no question really why they decide to go abroad.

the thing is since these soldiers don't like to resign from the armed forces they take a few months leave and work as s.o.f. with the consent of their superior officer. of course, this "consent" does not come for free. the usual arrangement is for the soldier to give his pay in the armed forces to his superior officer for the duration of his leave. galing talaga.

darth board
06-22-2006, 21:29
Originally posted by magister
in a newscast last night, tv patrol i think, filipino soldiers were interviewed and asked why they wanted to work as s.o.f.. obviously most of them said it was for the pay. lets face it. a lowly private earns a basic pay of around 5500 pesos a mo. no question really why they decide to go abroad.

the thing is since these soldiers don't like to resign from the armed forces they take a few months leave and work as s.o.f. with the consent of their superior officer. of course, this "consent" does not come for free. the usual arrangement is for the soldier to give his pay in the armed forces to his superior officer for the duration of his leave. galing talaga. kapal talaga!!!