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Jap1987
09-06-2006, 14:23
Im having trouble locating the requirements needed to pass infantry training. So if someone could list or direct me to the requirements of Pushups, Situps, running it would help alot.

Sam White
09-06-2006, 14:38
Look up "ARMY PT STANDARDS" on Google. You'll find age/gender charts showing what you need to pass the Army Physical Fitness Test. In the Army, especially the Infantry, you should view those standards as an absolute minimum rather than "good enough." If you end up going to Ft. Benning, you'll be grateful for any extra fitness you built up before shipping out. You may (will) find youself sick, hurting, tired, etc. when test day comes- if you can only meet the standard on a good day you will fail if you're not feeling up to par.

Jap1987
09-06-2006, 14:39
thank you

nothing
09-06-2006, 15:11
http://www.bgsu.edu/departments/mils/Pages/Information%20Pages/Forms,%20FMs,%20&%20Standards/apft_standards.htm

You need a minimum of 60 points in each event to pass. Based on your age group you will need:

42 Pushups
53 Situps
15:54 2 Mile Run

Don't do the minumum

Jap1987
09-06-2006, 15:36
I know I don't want to go for minimum it just sucks training to be better at something when you have to do it alone. I have never been good a pushups no matter how many times I do them as of now I can get around 55-60 in two minutes. Ive wanted to join the infantry every since I was in 6th grade. If I got in I know I would be striving to keep bettering myself.

Biscuitsjam
09-06-2006, 16:15
You'd get a lot of physical training in infantry school. Even if you weren't good enough now, the army would make sure you improved enough to pass before graduation. Still, life will be a lot easier and the chance of injury much less if you start already able to meet minimum requirements.

Also be aware, however, that army-standard pushups make you go almost all the way down to the ground (upper arms parallel), while keeping your torso perfectly straight. Army-standard pushups are more difficult than what many people consider "pushups," and if you don't do a rep correctly, it won't be counted.

Jap1987
09-06-2006, 16:32
Yeah, while I do them I try to make sure my chest almost hits and most of the time im parallel or just below.

Sam White
09-06-2006, 16:58
For the pushup event during the APFT, they'll explain what you need to do. They also allow "2 authorized rest positions": sagging in the middle or arching your back. You still need to keep your hands touching the ground and can't put all of your weight on your legs, but stopping to rest when you get tired will get you a bunch more pushups. You can also try stopping and resting once you get tired, then doing your pushups in three's.

For situps, you can do more if you let your body fall (not slam into) the ground instead of using your abs to raise AND lower yourself. You'll get more situps done just because you're moving faster.

Jap1987
09-06-2006, 17:19
Are the situps done with feet supported or unsupported.



Again I appreciate all of your posts.

hi speed
09-06-2006, 17:22
Supported

Jap1987
09-06-2006, 18:03
One more question. When doing the markmanship tests are you firing through standard iron sights or some sort of scope.

And also it was said in an earlier post that they will train you up if you cant meet the requirements. I was under the belief that they tested you before you even started and if you failed your gone.

Sam White
09-06-2006, 19:27
If you're just talking about Infantry OSUT (Basic and AIT are combined for Army Infantry), yes you will be given training and chances to redeem yourself if you fail a PT test. You'll have to do an easier PT test to leave the reception area and begin training. If you don't make it, you'll stay behind and do PT until you pass. Likewise, at Basic and AIT you'll be given more than one chance. Once you get to the end of OSUT or AIT, the PT test is a graduation requirement. They'll give you a bunch of chances. Once you graduate and become MOS qualified and go to your unit, it's up to your command what they want to do with you (if you fail an APFT). Keep in mind, the Army wants you to succeed and need people to do its work.

Jap1987
09-06-2006, 19:36
Thanks alot for the post.

nothing
09-06-2006, 22:06
Originally posted by Jap1987
One more question. When doing the markmanship tests are you firing through standard iron sights or some sort of scope.

And also it was said in an earlier post that they will train you up if you cant meet the requirements. I was under the belief that they tested you before you even started and if you failed your gone.

I could be wrong, but the guys I've talked to that have recently graduated have told me you will fire both iron sights and through the M68 (aimpoint CCO).

As stated before, you will be given plenty of chances. Most people fail the run. If you have access to weights I really recommend lifting to increase your pushup score. 3 sets of 8-12 reps usually works pretty well for me.

If not try doing half your 2 minute max for 4 sets. So if you do 60 in 2 minutes do 4 sets of 30 with a 1 minute break between each set. The last set will be the hardest, go to your knees and do girl (no offense ladies) pushups when you hit muscle failure. Once you can do all 4 sets correctly add 2 pushups to each set.

Don't over do your training. I see a lot of people try to do too much too fast and they end up with injuries. Give yourself time to recover, take weekends off. Another good PT program is the MAX APFT program.

http://www.apft.net/maxyourapft.html

A_Swede_17_1911
09-08-2006, 17:41
You will have to do something like 17 push-ups, and 32 situp and run a mile in a 8.5 minutes, before you leave to even go to basic training. This is done with the recruiter, I have to give my Future Soldiers.

In basic you will have to get 60 points at a minimum, to pass. These events include 2 minutes of push-ups, 2 minutes of sit ups and a 2 mile run.

You well have a pt test probably your 2nd day of basic. They want to see were you are all at. Then you will have something like 4-5 more though out, and the final one is the one that you have to pass.

Also, far as Rifle Qualification goes, you will shoot with Iron sights. You have to shoot a minimum of 23 targets out of 40 to qualify with a rifle. If you shoot 36 or more out of 40 that is considered "expert".

You could shoot with an optic, more than likely it will be and M68, and you will also fire at night with the IR laser and night vision. You will learn how to zero them all and bore sight them.

Oh yeah you will have have to be able to road march. Also throw grenades and other infantry tasks to complete training.

Squaw Man Wolfer
09-10-2006, 12:16
My info is decades old, but I'll chime in and add the following.

While it is not specifically on the PT test, I think it is a good idea to work on chin ups and pullups. You will be doing some obstacle courses and that will really add to your self confidence.

Biscuitsjam
09-10-2006, 23:18
As I remember it:

MEPS - This is when you enlist. Your recruiter MAY get you to take a diagnostic PT test, but it isn't required. If you get a really high score on the diagnostic, you get an automatic promotion before even starting Basic Training (up to E3 I think). Even if you fail miserably, you can still join up if you meet weight standards. They look at several other physical factors as well, such as balance, eyesight, flexibility, the existence of all fingers and toes, and they test your intelligence. If you are smarter than a box of hammers, you can join. Otherwise, buy a study guide.

Reception - All you do here is go from station to station. At some stations, you get shots, while at others you pick up your uniform, one piece at a time. This usually takes 2-7 days. During this time period, you'll get yelled at constantly, but you probably won't have to do much physical exercise. This is mostly an adjustment period before the real fun begins.

Day 0 - At the end of reception, you have to pass a VERY basic PT test. I think it is 17 pushups in 2 minutes, 1 mile in 9.5 minutes, and an absurdly equivalent number of situps. If you fail this test (and very few do), you'll get sent to fat camp, where they make recruits do constant PT until they can.

First week - This is mainly class time, where you learn things like Army history and values. The drill sergeants make you do pushups, military press, dips, and other exercises almost constantly. They seek out the weak recruits and break them down.

Weeks 2-8 - In OSUT, you'll start to learn some infantry stuff almost from the beginning. You'll also go to the rifle range during this period, and do several obstacle courses. There is also an early diagnostic PT test to let you know where you stand. Every week, things get a little easier, partly because you are stronger, and partly because the drill sergeants increasingly focus more on teaching than punishment. As things progress, you get more and more benefits, like the ability to make a 5-minute phonecall home.

Week 9 - You take a diagnostic PT test. On this test, you only have to score to the 50% percentile in each area (normal passing score is 60%). If you fail this PT test, you get recycled back to day 1.

Weeks 10-14 - During this time period, you focus more and more on infantry training. This means you spend a lot of time with instructors other than your drill sergeants. Because of this, and several other factors, you need to start taking responsibility for your own physical fitness. For instance, do pushups in the halls while on fireguard duty. Otherwise, your physical fitness will deteriorate. At about week 14, you'll do a long roadmarch out to a field training exercise, where you'll sleep outside and do infantry-type stuff.

Week 15 - You now have your final PT test. On this test, you have to meet the army-minimum standards of 60% in each area. This is the same test that everybody in the army takes, but the drill sergeants grade to a VERY high standard. That means that you need to go even further on pushups than you would otherwise. Failures on this test get one retest, and if they fail again, they get sent home as rejects. Those that pass graduate and go to join their units (they'll announce where you go about 2 weeks prior to graduation).

Biscuitsjam
09-10-2006, 23:19
Originally posted by Squaw Man Wolfer
My info is decades old, but I'll chime in and add the following.

While it is not specifically on the PT test, I think it is a good idea to work on chin ups and pullups. You will be doing some obstacle courses and that will really add to your self confidence. They've added pullup bars to every base. Within a few years, pullups will be a required part of the PT test.