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jolt8me
09-10-2006, 13:06
Salmon season is starting here in michigan. I live on the grand river. Pretty strong current, murky, and not too deep. I have tried unsuccessfully to catach anything but bass. Tried spooons, glow in the dark shads, spinners, drifting shiners, drifting salmon eggs, and nothing.
Any tips or favorite baits that i could try to catch salmon?

NYGunman
09-11-2006, 01:55
Are there any tributaries to that river? If so fish those smaller tribs after a rain or even during the full blown run. This way you can work on your presentation while seeing fish. You will see what works and what doesn't. Salmon will strike at lures despite what many will tell you.

I primarily fly-fish but you can use this setup. Have your primary line go to a swivel. Attach a small piece of fishing line off of this swivel. It should only be 6" long. Attach the smallest amount of split shot to that piece of string. Just enough to get the lure to skip along the bottom. This is where the salmon are.

Too much weight will constantly hang you up and prevent a good presentation. With the correct amount of weight you will get a bunch of snags. The purpose of the string is so that the split shot will slide off instead of losing your whole rig.

Your leader should be from 18" to 2 1/2 feet. You should have a variety of flies and objects. Try different shapes and colors. I prefer Wooly Buggers in black and olive. I also had success with stoneflies and minnow patterns. I also made a few creations. You will be surprised at what they hit. I took a bare hook and strung a square piece of cloth to it. I hooked into six Chinooks in an hour.

You might be fishing in the wrong area. If possible get away from the crowds. Do you know how to read water? If you can you will find the areas that the salmon will go to. They generally all take the same path in some parts of the river. Target areas behind rocks and the channels.

Most people wade too far into the water. They stand where they should be fishing. A general rule is that you should not have to stand in water that is over your calves. The salmon like to take the easier route (less current) and quite often that is closer to shore.

If you can, try to locate the fish by sight. I am very good at this and is the primary reason why I catch the fish. Why waste time fishing waters that may or may not contain a fish? Fish water that you know has a fish! Quite often you will only see a white dot or an olive green shadow that is out of place. Sometimes the only sign will be a ripple that is out of place. You will need a good pair of polarized glasses.

Depending on the water, you probably don't need to cast. A long rod between 8 and 11 feet is the norm around here. Basically we just drift the bait in the target zone. If we let out enough line and toss the lure above the area where the fish should be. It should drift into that zone where the fish is. You should not have much slack in the line. At the end of the drift just pull up the line and toss the lure upriver again.

You should watch the line as it drifts down. A strike indicator or a small bobber may help you see the line. When the line stops, gently pull up. If it is a snag the hook might come free. If a fish grabbed it you will know. At first it will feel like you hook a log or branch. It will move very little but still feel solid. This is when you set the hook. Be prepared for the little freight train to take your line out. You must have a good drag and rod. If the drag is set too tight you can break the rod. If the rod is too stiff it can break itself or the line.

Follow my directions and you'll probably catch fish. Below are two picture of me with a couple of kings.

<img src="http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h10/NYGunman/salmon.jpg">

<img src="http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h10/NYGunman/NewImage.jpg">

saluki9
09-11-2006, 05:08
Wow. NYG

those are just awesome. I'm very jealous!

Nice job

NYGunman
09-11-2006, 11:52
Originally posted by saluki9
Wow. NYG

those are just awesome. I'm very jealous!

Nice job Thanks! I can't wait to go fishing. The major salmon run just started today in my neck of the woods.

Squaw Man Wolfer
09-14-2006, 07:28
Technique used on the Salmon River near Pulaski, New York..

Put hook on about a two foot leader, beneath a medium lead weight. "Bait" the hook with a piece of read foam.

Fish in shallow water. Spot the fish coming up stream. As the fish comes up stream drop the leader a few feet in front of the mouth, let it drift in and lift smoothly to hook the fish.

(Yep, this is as hard as it sound.) But when it works, it works GREAT!

This technique is call "lining" or "lifting". Some call it illegal, but is not if you follow all local laws to a tee. It is NOT grabbing. If you hook anywhere but the mouth., go ahead and break off the line. you will have no luck landing a foul hooked fish.

Pointers:

Visbility will vary greatly, often a fish is just a moving blur.

Polarized sun glasses that also block the sides greatly aid in spotting fish. They are a MUST!

NYGunman
09-14-2006, 18:50
Originally posted by Squaw Man Wolfer
Technique used on the Salmon River near Pulaski, New York..

Put hook on about a two foot leader, beneath a medium lead weight. "Bait" the hook with a piece of read foam.

Fish in shallow water. Spot the fish coming up stream. As the fish comes up stream drop the leader a few feet in front of the mouth, let it drift in and lift smoothly to hook the fish.

(Yep, this is as hard as it sound.) But when it works, it works GREAT!

This technique is call "lining" or "lifting". Some call it illegal, but is not if you follow all local laws to a tee. It is NOT grabbing. If you hook anywhere but the mouth., go ahead and break off the line. you will have no luck landing a foul hooked fish.

Pointers:

Visibility will vary greatly, often a fish is just a moving blur.

Polarized sun glasses that also block the sides greatly aid in spotting fish. They are a MUST! Snagging and lining is frowned upon up here. Many people still do it but it is changing.

Actually lining is done with a longer leader. There is a ban on long leaders on the tribs over 4' long.

Lining is close to what I do (which is a dead drift) but differs greatly. Most of the fish I go after actually bite out of aggression. Chinooks and cohos are mean and will chomp just about anything in front of them.

People who "line" will lift at the end of every cast hoping to snag the fish in the belly or mouth. I don't do that. I wait for a grab in the drift. You don't normally get a huge tug because they normally just sit there and mash the lure. All you will see is that the line has stopped moving. Basically they want to kill it. Most of the fish I hook into are inside the mouth. "Lifters" generally hook outside the mouth or belly near the fins.

Like you said a "liner" waits for a fish to come up river and toss a fly at them hoping to snag them. I actually look for fish sitting above riffles or in pockets. Moving fish generally don't bite unless they are chasing your fly or lure.

Here is a thread on a fishing forum that specifically deals with lining.

http://www.fishusa.com/Discussion2/viewthread.asp?forum=AMB_AP329826884&id=22799

I'm glad I could clear that up for you.

NYGunman
09-26-2006, 15:27
Jolt8me, how did you do? The run around here is slow and a bit late. I only managed to land one small male king about 18 pounds and 34 inches. I hooked into a few more but they got away. ~ Jim

<img src="http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h10/NYGunman/honda450063.jpg">

jolt8me
09-27-2006, 06:38
I did really poorly in fact. Caught 0. THey are still running here so i still have a chance. Accidently caught some bass if that counts.

CookieGirl
09-27-2006, 19:18
Have you tried pale pink or off-white beads? They work really well with Dolly Varden, and if you find a salmon that's actually got an appetite, anything that looks like an egg or a fertilized egg will be tempting. Good luck. I watched the king run in Alaska last fall (without fishing though) and it was the most fantastic thing I've ever seen...well, since meeting my daughter as a newborn, anyway.

Squaw Man Wolfer
09-28-2006, 23:11
Originally posted by NYGunman
Snagging and lining is frowned upon up here. Many people still do it but it is changing.

Actually lining is done with a longer leader. There is a ban on long leaders on the tribs over 4' long.

Lining is close to what I do (which is a dead drift) but differs greatly. Most of the fish I go after actually bite out of aggression. Chinooks and cohos are mean and will chomp just about anything in front of them.

People who "line" will lift at the end of every cast hoping to snag the fish in the belly or mouth. I don't do that. I wait for a grab in the drift. You don't normally get a huge tug because they normally just sit there and mash the lure. All you will see is that the line has stopped moving. Basically they want to kill it. Most of the fish I hook into are inside the mouth. "Lifters" generally hook outside the mouth or belly near the fins.

Like you said a "liner" waits for a fish to come up river and toss a fly at them hoping to snag them. I actually look for fish sitting above riffles or in pockets. Moving fish generally don't bite unless they are chasing your fly or lure.

Here is a thread on a fishing forum that specifically deals with lining.

http://www.fishusa.com/Discussion2/viewthread.asp?forum=AMB_AP329826884&id=22799

I'm glad I could clear that up for you.



My info is about ten years old, and you seem to have more updated info than I do.

But I want to make a couple of points. One, the guys who trained me took it as gospel that a chinook on a spawning run is not interested in feeding. Maybe right, maybe wrong. But, hence, lining.

There was no effort to hook a salmon in the belly. We were working with 12 pound line and fly rods. If you hooked a salmon in any place but the mouth, you just broke it off and started over.

We were, in no sense, snatchers or grabbers.

NYGunman
09-29-2006, 12:14
Originally posted by Squaw Man Wolfer


But I want to make a couple of points. One, the guys who trained me took it as gospel that a chinook on a spawning run is not interested in feeding. Maybe right, maybe wrong. But, hence, lining.

You are right that they are not feeding. They will bite just to kill whatever they perceive as a threat to their redds. I've seen a Chinook chase my fly through the rapids to nail it.

On the other hand it the fish are spooked they won't bite out of aggression. I walk miles to avoid the crowds and to find "fresh" fish.

Squaw Man Wolfer
09-29-2006, 12:32
Originally posted by NYGunman
You are right that they are not feeding. They will bite just to kill whatever they perceive as a threat to their redds. I've seen a Chinook chase my fly through the rapids to nail it.

On the other hand it the fish are spooked they won't bight out of aggression. I walk miles to avoid the crowds and to find "fresh" fish.

Thanks for the clarification!

I doubt if I'll ever get up there again, but if I do, I'll keep that technique in mind.

When I was there, it was kinda hard to avoid the crowds, the banks were pretty packed.