Position vs. Technology [Archive] - Glock Talk

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iiibbb
12-04-2006, 05:32
So I took a friend hunting for the first time on Saturday (afternoon of last day of the season) and I have an observation.

I'm still relatively new at hunting myself. I can easily influenced by sales pitches for things like, sentless soap, charcoal impregnated underwear, deer scents, calls, etc. I've never followed through on it, but usually these people are more experienced than I am so I can't help but listen.

So at about 1pm I took him to one of the properties I have access to and sat him down on the ground at what the landowner refers to as the "magic rock"... because someone kills something there literally every year it's been hunted.

I spritzed a couple of trees with racoon urine, and went off to another part of the proerty that doesn't get hunted much, but has a lot of deer sign.

So... my friend actually bagged a 6-pointer about 15 minutes before the end of the season. Not a great shot, but the deer did die, and he did find it. He was to be commended for having the patience to wait for a better shot than he had when he first saw the thing. I think he waited about 5 minutes for his shot. He probably hit it just forward of the left shoulder and it exited throguh the right shoulder... perhaps puncturing one lung. It ran about 100 yards and took about a minute more to die when he found it. Still a kill is a kill. For reference, he was using a M1A1 with a Leuopold scope on it (not owning a hunting rifle)... 180 gr corelok.

Needless to say, he didn't do anything special, and he even did a few things wrong. Especially, he didn't sit still because he was cold, so he got up often to warm up. When he had to go to the bathroom, he wandered away from his spot instead of getting it done quickly. I suppose he was quiet.

So the moral of this story for all those folks who are new, or are having trouble getting a deer... position/location seems to be much more important than technology when it comes to bagging a deer.

I count myself lucky that my mentor is of the minimalist variety and has saved me a buttload of money, but I've still managed to be successfull in my 3 seasons. My long-run average so far is a deer for every 3-4 days hunted and that's only because I had a bad year last year with 1 deer in 10 days hunted.

HEMI 27
12-10-2006, 10:10
I can agree with that. I was one of those guys that bought alit of the fancy stuff and have had no luck with any of those super scents,etc.

How'd I bag my first one? Blue jeans, t-shirt orange vest and a grunt call. Bam! done deal. Hell I even played poker on my cell phone that time I was out there. I really didnt want to hunt that day but my buddy didnt want to be out there alone in case he got one so I went and sat and got a kill.

Sharker
12-10-2006, 13:19
Yeah, all the gidgets are just more stuff to take out of the pack at the end of the day/season. I personally take a rifle, binos, knife, and compass in the woods as manditory stuff. If I am going to be spending all day in the woods, then other stuff makes it into a back pack.

A good spot with the wind at your favor is all you need. If you can figure why a spots good, and then not disturb it too much through out the season... then it should pay when the wind is right to use it.

One of the biggest mistakes I see newbies doing while hunting is not getting a general layout of their stand/hunting spot! By that I mean they dont figure that optimal hunting for that spot is by NNW-NNE wind, and instead get in place before they realize that wind is at their back.. and then try to leave, or worse try to hunt it anyways. Its much easier to take a mental note when setting up the spot, and then getting a wind direction at the truck to be sure that your not going to blow your spot. (in swirling wind its different, but a good spot should be reserved for the right conditions.)